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December 3, 2012 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy, Los Angeles Times
When the Recording Academy consolidated last year's Grammy nominations by eliminating 31 categories in R&B, American roots music, classical, Latin, jazz, country, pop and rock fields, the changes felt out of key for some musicians. There were grumblings, protests, petitions and a group of Latin jazz artists even filed a class action lawsuit to contest the restructuring, which brought the total number of categories down to 78 from 109. This year, the Recording Academy has added three new categories to previously scaled back fields with the addition of awards for classical compendium, Latin jazz album and urban contemporary album.
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SPORTS
April 1, 2014
Bill Plaschke, a staple of The Times Sports section since joining the paper in 1987, has taken first place in the Associated Press Sports Editors annual contest for column writing among papers with circulations of more than 175,000. Plaschke, a columnist since 1996, has now won the prestigious national columnist award five times and has been a frequent top-10 finisher in multiple writing categories. The contest honors the best work in sports journalism both in print and on the web. The final column-writing results were announced Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Scott Collins
The TV Academy has decided that TV movies like "Behind the Candelabra" shouldn't have to compete with the likes of "American Horror Story" anymore.  Late Thursday, officials announced that for the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards in August, separate categories for miniseries and TV movies will be restored. The academy had combined the two categories back in 2011, reasoning that the decline in the network miniseries business had made it unnecessary to hand out two separate awards. But since then, miniseries have exploded on basic cable networks, with Emmy-nominated hits such as "The Bible" and "Hatfields & McCoys.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By John Sandweg
President Obama recently directed Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson to examine U.S. immigration enforcement policies to see how the department can "conduct enforcement more humanely within the confines of the law. " The answer to the president's directive is surprisingly simple: Homeland Security's Immigration and Customs Enforcement division, known as ICE, should eliminate "non-criminal re-entrants and immigration fugitives" as a priority...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Here's a modest proposal for the Golden Globe Awards telecast Sunday night: Make the presenters wear tragic masks when reading the nominations in the drama categories and comic masks when reading the nominations in the musical/comedy categories. That way we'll have a better chance of keeping the knuckleheaded division straight this year. How else are we to remember that "Inside Llewyn Davis," a somewhat downbeat picaresque adventure from the Coen brothers, is competing as a comedy, while "Philomena," a real-life morality tale masquerading as a chuckling odd couple comedy, is contending as a drama?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The Academy Awards telecast has been such a snooze in recent years. By the time the ceremony rolls around, the winners are completely predictable. What was the big surprise last year? That Meryl Streep, the most decorated actress alive, won over Viola Davis. Not even the master of impersonation herself could feign being all that shocked. For those who like their awards shows with a modicum of suspense, Sunday's Tony Awards ceremony, otherwise known as prom night for glee club geeks, should provide a refreshing change.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2011 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times
Who gets nominated for a Grammy? Musicians, sure. But who exactly, on paper, are they? Take Frank Sinatra. Yes, he was a singer of incredible power, and garnered deserved nods for the beauty of his tone and his mellifluous phrasing. But artistry aside, on a basic level, pop singer Francis Sinatra was a native of Hoboken, N.J., a white male who earned his first nominations in the Grammys' first year, 1959. Or multifaceted jazz bassist and vocalist Esperanza Spalding, a surprise nominee for best new artist this year.
SCIENCE
September 20, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
It might seem that the range of scents humans can detect is infinite, but scientists have managed to sort them all into 10 basic categories, ranging from peppermint to pungent. The classifications are meant to be the olfactory equivalent of the five basic tastes (sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami).  To come up with the 10 scents, neuroscientists turned to a 30-year-old database that contained profiles of 144 odors.  Each odor was assessed by human subjects, who were given a list of 146 words and asked to rate how well each word described the odor.
OPINION
October 1, 1995
The O.J. Simpson trial is a shoo-in to win Oscar nominations in all categories except best director. JOHN A. SELEINE Seal Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1996
As producer of the recent Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards, I feel a reply to Lin Shaye's letter last Sunday is needed to clarify the situation. If Shaye was not so close to one nominee, she may have noticed there were three categories, not one, that had nominees but no recipients. I felt it was kinder to just list the nominees in the printed program. The show's host, Nan Martin, did announce early in the program that the Circle honors "excellence" and not "best" and therefore there would be multiple recipients in some categories while other categories would have no recipients.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Book U2 frontman Bono for the Grammy Awards and perhaps only a Beatle or a Rolling Stone could upstage him. At the Oscars, however, the rock 'n' roll humanitarian had nothing on a Disney princess. Idina Menzel stole the Dolby Theatre stage Sunday with "Let It Go," the diva belter from Disney's smash "Frozen," which would go on to win the Oscar a few minutes later for original song. "To our fellow nominees, you are all rock stars - literally," said Kristen Anderson-Lopez as she accepted the Oscar with her husband, Robert Lopez.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
You should have your Oscar pool by now. Twenty-four categories. One hundred and twenty-one choices. And, no, "The Lego Movie" is not among them. (Next year. Next year.) We've been here for you for the last six months, starting back in September when "12 Years a Slave" and "Gravity" pulled to the front of the pack after wowing at the Telluride and Toronto film festivals. And here we are ... yes, same as it ever was , with the Oscars coming around the bend on Sunday. So, one last time, the envelopes, please.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
An Oscar, whether it is for lead actress or for makeup and hair, weighs exactly the same (8.5 pounds). A win in production design represents a level of achievement in a craft on par with best director. The night for all the winners is just as golden - same stars overhead. Yet there is a different, dimmer spotlight on the below-the-line contenders. Their red carpet walk will go unnoted, their gowns and tuxedo flair overlooked and their heartfelt speeches mostly unremembered or rudely cut short.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
As the final stop on the awards-show circuit before the Oscars, the Film Independent Spirit Awards serve as both a warm-up for the main event and a chance for some smaller non-Oscar-contenders to step into the spotlight for a moment. The race for best feature, the Spirit Awards' top honor, includes two Oscar nominees for best picture: the historical drama "12 Years a Slave" and the father-son road movie "Nebraska. " The other three candidates are "All Is Lost," about a sailor stranded in a damaged boat; "Frances Ha," about an aspiring dancer; and "Inside Llewyn Davis," about a down-on-his-luck folk singer.
OPINION
February 26, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The headlines on the Pentagon budget unveiled by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel this week were all about austerity: the smallest U.S. Army since 1940; fewer aircraft, ships and armored vehicles; even some modest belt-tightening on future military pay and benefits. But one category of military spending largely escaped the budget ax: nuclear weapons. The United States has about 1,600 long-range nuclear weapons on active duty - more than any other country, including Vladimir Putin's Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Scott Collins
The TV Academy has decided that TV movies like "Behind the Candelabra" shouldn't have to compete with the likes of "American Horror Story" anymore.  Late Thursday, officials announced that for the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards in August, separate categories for miniseries and TV movies will be restored. The academy had combined the two categories back in 2011, reasoning that the decline in the network miniseries business had made it unnecessary to hand out two separate awards. But since then, miniseries have exploded on basic cable networks, with Emmy-nominated hits such as "The Bible" and "Hatfields & McCoys.
NEWS
September 20, 1992
After sitting through 3 1/2 hours of the Emmy Awards telecast (Fox), I've come to the conclusion that the Emmys aren't fair. Guest stars should not be nominated in categories designed for regular cast performers (i.e. Christopher Lloyd for "Avonlea" and Kelsey Grammar for "Wings). The television academy should create categories designed for guest stars. Jennifer Sato, Montebello
OPINION
February 8, 2002
Re "Greenest Games Ever? Not!" Opinion, Feb. 3: I remember how much fun it was working at the 1960 Squaw Valley Olympics before things got out of hand. Here is my plan to save the Olympic Games. Both the Summer and Winter Games would be divided into three categories and staged consecutively at three different host countries. This would improve logistics, security and manageability, shift the focus back to the athletes and bring back the Olympic spirit. The three categories would be: 1. Sports: volleyball, tennis, hockey, baseball, etc. 2. Competition: track & field, races, weightlifting, etc. 3. Performance: diving, gymnastics, ice skating, anything decided by judges or involving horses, guns or kayaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It's easy to feel a certain fatigue as awards season drags along, with even the most dedicated Oscar-ologists tiring of talking about the same boiled-down pool of a few films. So this may be just the time to turn to the lesser-known quarters of the Oscar ballot, such as the relatively obscure corners of the foreign language film category. It is widely anticipated that the prize will go to either Italy's "The Great Beauty," which picked up similar prizes at the Golden Globes and BAFTAs, or Denmark's "The Hunt," which stars actor Mads Mikkelsen, currently seen on the U.S. television show "Hannibal.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
The Writers Guild of America honored Spike Jonze for his future-set love story "Her" with its award for original screenplay and Billy Ray for "Captain Phillips," the true story of a hijacking at sea, for adapted screenplay on Saturday night. The awards were announced during simultaneous ceremonies in Los Angeles and New York. The original screenplay category matched up five-for-five in nominations with the Academy Awards, perhaps tipping the hand of what awards-watchers may expect to see at the Oscars in a few weeks.
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