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SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Amina Khan
When this tree is down in the trenches of a dry season and battling pesky leaf-eaters, it calls upon its trusty allies: ants. Ecuador laurel trees will produce an extra dose of sweet, sticky sap to attract Azteca pittieri ants that aggressively protect their arboreal home from herbivores, says a new study in PLOS Biology. Trees and ants are often sturdy allies, said lead author Elizabeth Pringle, an ecologist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. A complex food chain can take place among their branches: Little scale insects suck sugary sap out of the tree's innards and then poop it out as "honeydew.
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NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Democratic efforts to frame recent Republican policies and right-wing statements as part of a larger “war on women” led by the GOP took another step Sunday. On CNN's “State of the Union,” Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz portrayed Republicans as “turning back the clock for women.” “Gov. [Scott] Walkerjust signed a bill that repeals the equal pay law that they had in Wisconsin for years,” she said to host Candy Crowley. “You have Republicans that have engaged themselves for the entire Congress on trying to redefine rape as only being forceful rape, defunding Planned Parenthood and family planning programs.” Wasserman Schultz's remarks, in which she also called the GOP "callous and insensitive," follow Republican National Chairman Reince Priebus' response Thursday to allegations of a war on women on Bloomberg TV. “If the Democrats said we had a war on caterpillars, and mainstream media outlets talked about the fact Republicans have a war on caterpillars, then we have problems with caterpillars,” Priebus said.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | MICHAEL ISIKOFF, THE WASHINGTON POST
After years of despair over South America's burgeoning coca crop, the Bush Administration is studying a new option in the Latin drug war: unleashing swarms of tiny insects into the jungles of Peru and Bolivia to devour the shrubs that are the raw material for cocaine. At the urging of national drug control director William J. Bennett, the Administration recently more than quadrupled, to $6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2009 | Amy Littlefield
California's Department of Food and Agriculture plans to continue efforts to eliminate an invasive moth that it says poses a risk to fruit and ornamental plants, despite protests from scientists and environmentalists who say the measures are unnecessary. Moth detection has led to quarantines in 3,500 square miles in 15 counties, including Los Angeles, causing millions of dollars in lost revenue, said Michael Jarvis, deputy secretary for public affairs at the California Department of Food and Agriculture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1986 | TERRY McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
Until this year, there were no women riding bulldozers into brush fires in Los Angeles County. Then, along came Betty Jo Messinger of Lake View Terrace. Messinger, 29, the only woman bulldozer "swamper" on the county Fire Department, helped fight the fire that burned more than 800 acres north of Saugus in late July. It was her second fire in the year since she began training to be a swamper--a sort of co-pilot for the bulldozer driver. "I'm like an extra set of eyes for the driver," she said.
SCIENCE
February 23, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A hormone is the secret behind the unusual ability of young swallowtail caterpillars to disguise themselves as bird droppings and then as the leaves they live on before becoming butterflies, Japanese researchers found. The researchers said in Friday's journal Science that a special juvenile hormone keeps larvae of the butterfly Papilio xuthus, common in Japan, in their black and white bird- excrement camouflage. Then levels of this hormone drop, triggering the green-leaf phase.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1990
Alpharel Inc. in Camarillo said it received approval to begin installing an electronic imaging system at Caterpillar Inc., a contract valued at more than $1 million. Alpharel's products are used for scanning documents and placing those images in computerized data storage systems for future retrieval or transmission. Installation of its system at Caterpillar, a Peoria, Ill.-based maker of earthmoving equipment, should be completed by early 1991, Alpharel said.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Caterpillar Inc. today reported fourth-quarter earnings of $11 million or 11 cents a share, down 90% from $107 million or $1.05 a share for the same period a year earlier. For the full year ending Dec. 31, 1990, earnings were $210 million or $2.07 a share, down 58% from $497 million or $4.90 a share for 1989. The heavy-equipment maker said the decline resulted from higher costs and a 3% decline in physical sales volume.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1985 | DONALD WOUTAT
Caterpillar Tractor reported a $131-million profit for the third quarter, in sharp contrast to a $92-million loss a year earlier, putting the company in the black for the year to date. But the firm said the quarterly profit had more to do with tax credits and various one-time gains than with any big improvements in the company's business. On a pretax basis that more accurately reflects operating results, the Peoria, Ill.
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