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Catfish

NATIONAL
December 14, 2003 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
One day this fall, flags at offices and businesses throughout Mississippi's capital were solemnly lowered as a sign of mourning and respect. Thalia Mara, 92, had died after a month in declining health. The city gave its leading devotee of dance a close approximation of a state funeral. For an afternoon, Mara's shiny, closed wooden casket was put on view in the performing arts hall that bears her name, flanked by honor guards from the city's police and fire departments.
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WORLD
December 8, 2002 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
Nguyen Hoang Kha has no regrets that he sold his small construction business and invested in catfish farming when Vietnam and the United States ended a generation of enmity and became trading partners. The decision lifted him out of poverty, offering opportunity beyond his dreams as his communist homeland changes to a free-market economy.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2002 | From Associated Press
The U.S. International Trade Commission said Thursday that there is a "reasonable indication" that the nation's catfish industry is being threatened by a cheaper Vietnamese import. The decision, on a 5-0 vote, will let the Commerce Department proceed with an investigation of whether Vietnamese frozen fillets have been "dumped" in the United States. Dumping is the practice of exporting a product at a price lower than that charged for the same product in a home market.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2002 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 100 degrees, the mosquitoes are descending in clouds and five men with shirts stuck to their backs with sweat wade into the slime-green pond and begin to scoop out catfish. Their nets are full. The fish are fat. But these days, that's almost a curse. The whiskered critters--a staple of the Southern diet, a symbol of the region's culture--are barely worth the grain it costs to feed them.
NEWS
January 20, 2002 | JANET McCONNAUGHEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It prowls the pond, on the hunt for pelicans and cormorants. When it's close enough, splat! It's a solar-powered robot scarecrow that guards catfish and crawfish ponds with a water cannon. The basic model has paddlewheels and pontoons; a student is building one to look like a big alligator. There are still bugs to be worked out, but developers at Louisiana State University figure they may be able to talk to manufacturers about their project sometime next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2001 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are two Uncle Darrow's. The little Uncle Darrow's is a tiny dive in the middle of an obscure residential stretch of Venice Boulevard. Its parking lot boasts space for two whole cars. The big Uncle Darrow's, which opened in December, is in a newly built and much larger space just north of the corner of Lincoln and Washington boulevards, where it's bringing Louisiana food to street-level Marina del Rey.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few miles outside this college town, down a gravel road that runs through rolling woodlands, Rex Dunham has turned a set of muddy ponds into a high-security prison for fish. Electric wire keeps the raccoons at bay. Netting blocks the herons from swooping in. Filters stop the fish from slipping out with the waste water. Federal officials asked Dunham to protect the local environment from the catfish he grows here because nothing like them has ever cut the waters of the Earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2000 | THERESA MOREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When 100 dead catfish floated belly up to the lily-pad-laden surface of Laguna Lake last year, Fullerton city officials knew something had to be done. And so it shall be. State funds totaling $2 million have been earmarked to dredge the stagnant, silt-filled 10-acre lake in an all-out effort to restore it as a pond where catfish can thrive. The problem: a lack of oxygen. Laguna Lake is only 2 to 3 feet deep in most places.
FOOD
June 28, 2000 | DANAE CAMPBELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is it possible to fall in love with a piece of cookware? I've been baking and frying in my new cast-iron skillet nonstop since I bought it. Well-seasoned cast iron conducts heat evenly, making it a natural for frying fish. Add a side of coleslaw, a glass of iced tea and sliced fresh peaches over vanilla ice cream and you couldn't ask for a better meal. So get out the old pan (or start seasoning a new one) and fry up a mess o' something. You'll fall in love all over again.
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