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NEWS
June 8, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North was part of a group that may have covertly funneled hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Roman Catholic Church in Nicaragua after congressional committees blocked a similar CIA program in 1985, Newsweek magazine reported Sunday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Reunited for the first time with more than 1,000 faithful who fled Nicaragua's civil war, Roman Catholic Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo of Managua celebrated an outdoor Mass in Lynwood on Sunday and urged Southern California's Central American community to work for postwar peace.
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NEWS
February 8, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II celebrated Mass on Wednesday for hundreds of thousands of faithful at an open-air lakeside amphitheater here, hours after the 19th bombing of a Roman Catholic Church in Nicaragua in 10 months. Refraining from comment on the bombings, the 75-year-old pontiff favorably compared this visit--the second stop on a four-country tour--to his 1983 experience here. That time, chanting Sandinistas drowned out his words.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II celebrated Mass on Wednesday for hundreds of thousands of faithful at an open-air lakeside amphitheater here, hours after the 19th bombing of a Roman Catholic Church in Nicaragua in 10 months. Refraining from comment on the bombings, the 75-year-old pontiff favorably compared this visit--the second stop on a four-country tour--to his 1983 experience here. That time, chanting Sandinistas drowned out his words.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1991 | From Religious News Service
Two hundred fifty workers began laying the foundation this month for a new Roman Catholic cathedral here. The start of construction of the mammoth structure has unleashed a storm of controversy about its design and political implications. A wide range of Nicaraguans, including several prominent supporters of conservative Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo, have criticized the new cathedral--paid for by a U.S. pizza magnate--as an example of cultural imperialism.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The Sandinista authorities will allow Nicaragua's Roman Catholic radio station to resume religious programming today but have continued a five-week-old ban on its newscasts. The decision, announced Thursday, marked a narrowing of last month's clampdown on critics of the revolutionary government. Thirty-eight people arrested at a violent anti-Sandinista rally July 10 are still in jail awaiting trial, but the three other news outlets that were closed since then have reopened.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
In an impassioned Holy Week appeal, Nicaragua's Roman Catholic primate admonished Sandinista and rebel leaders Thursday not to betray the hopes raised by their preliminary peace accord. "The government and the resistance have given their word before the Nicaraguan people and the world," Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo said. "To break their word would be to lose credibility forever and pass into the darkest pages of history."
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | Associated Press
President Daniel Ortega on Tuesday announced that the government would permit the return of three Roman Catholic priests exiled by the Sandinistas. He called the decision "a gesture of good will." This is the first step the Sandinista government has taken toward complying with the provisions of the Central American peace plan that was signed on Aug. 7. Ortega, speaking at a news conference, also announced the creation of the National Reconciliation Commission, another key element in the plan.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | From Reuters
This country's Roman Catholic primate, Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo, on Sunday questioned the Sandinista government's version of the death of a Franciscan priest in a northern battle zone. In his Sunday sermon, Obando y Bravo offered his condolences to the Franciscan Order over the death of Tomas Agustin Zabaleta, a Salvadoran killed Friday when his vehicle hit a land mine 70 miles north of Managua. The government said the mine was planted by U.S.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Two Roman Catholic priests expelled from Nicaragua for criticizing the Sandinista government returned Saturday night to a jubilant welcome by hundreds of parishioners who shouted "Christianity si, Communism no!" Church leaders said the homecoming was a first step toward national reconciliation under a Central American peace accord calling for democratic reforms and an end to the war in Nicaragua by Nov. 7.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion damaged a Roman Catholic church on the eve of Pope John Paul II's visit, police said. The incident occurred in Masaya, about 15 miles southeast of Nicaragua's capital, Managua, where the pope is to arrive today. No injuries were reported. There was no immediate government reaction to the bombing, but security had already been stepped up ahead of the pope's arrival. About 20 churches have been bombed across Nicaragua over the past year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1991 | From Religious News Service
Two hundred fifty workers began laying the foundation this month for a new Roman Catholic cathedral here. The start of construction of the mammoth structure has unleashed a storm of controversy about its design and political implications. A wide range of Nicaraguans, including several prominent supporters of conservative Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo, have criticized the new cathedral--paid for by a U.S. pizza magnate--as an example of cultural imperialism.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Daniel Ortega announced Monday that he will ask the National Assembly to pardon all Nicaraguan political prisoners before the Feb. 25 national elections, a move that will free an estimated 1,156 inmates in the next four weeks. The Sandinista leader, who is seeking reelection, called the decision a gesture of reconciliation in response to appeals by the nation's Roman Catholic bishops.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
U.S.-backed Contras and the leftist Sandinista government on Wednesday traded accusations over an attack that killed two nuns, one an American, and wounded two other church workers in a remote area of Nicaragua. President Daniel Ortega lashed out at the United States, declaring: "The North American government is responsible for this crime because it pays the Contras to commit these crimes."
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Gunmen ambushed a car carrying church workers in northeastern Nicaragua and killed two nuns, one an American, church officials said Tuesday. They said an American bishop and a third nun were wounded. Father Marcelino Estrada said from Bluefields, Nicaragua, that the attack took place Monday night on a highway near Puerto Cabezas in a remote Caribbean coastal region about 200 miles northeast of Managua.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The government on Wednesday lifted an eight-month-old ban on news broadcasts by Nicaragua's Roman Catholic radio station, the only news medium still affected by last year's sweeping Sandinista crackdown on dissent. President Daniel Ortega announced the measure after meeting with Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo, the country's senior prelate. Ortega said it is meant to "create a better climate in our country for strengthening the trend toward a total and definitive peace" with the U.S.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The author of a Central American peace agreement on Thursday urged Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega to negotiate a cease-fire with U.S.-backed contras through mediation by the country's Roman Catholic cardinal. President Oscar Arias Sanchez of Costa Rica sent his proposal in a letter to the Sandinista leader as the five Central American foreign ministers opened two days of talks on how to carry out the accord.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
President Daniel Ortega said Tuesday that his government will establish a partial, unilateral cease-fire in certain areas of the country to be designated in the next few days.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Crippled since birth and forever poor, Agustin Delgadillo somehow managed to buy enough oranges, bananas and toy whistles for the scores of children making their evening rounds of shrines in his Managua barrio. The modest altar outside his two-room shack was illuminated by a bare light bulb. The centerpiece, nearly hidden among palm fronds and flowers, was a five-inch statue of the Virgin Mary, the object of intense devotion last week in Roman Catholic Nicaragua.
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
In a conflict with Nicaragua's Roman Catholic cardinal, the Sandinista government has moved to paralyze two independent groups that monitor its adherence to peace accords with neighboring countries and U.S.-backed rebels. One of the bodies, the National Reconciliation Commission, was set up to oversee Nicaraguan compliance with the five-nation Central American peace agreement of August, 1987.
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