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October 23, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his office on Dublin Road, George Patton, head of the 80,000-member Orange Lodge, sounded a theme often heard within Northern Ireland's Protestant community. "We Protestants have been in Northern Ireland for close to 400 years, and we remain very much British in our hearts and minds," he said. "How long do you have to live in your place until you can call it home?" "An American from West Virginia," he added, "may consider himself a West Virginian, but he is first an American.
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NEWS
July 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Protestant extremists claimed responsibility Wednesday for the slaying of a Roman Catholic teenager amid fears in this British province of a descent into more widespread violence over this weekend's disputed Protestant parade in Portadown. A passenger on a motorcycle fatally shot 19-year-old Ciaran Cummings in the town of Antrim--the first killing of its kind in Northern Ireland in more than a year.
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NEWS
July 5, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where religion and intolerance often walk hand in hand, the peaceful march by members of the Protestant Orange Order that took place Sunday was no small feat. The peace was carefully scripted, to be sure, secured by miles of barbed wire, hundreds of soldiers and police, and a ban on parading through a Roman Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
British authorities on Thursday banned a second Protestant parade from passing through Roman Catholic territory, as the province suffered through a fifth straight night of tension between the rival factions. There were concerns that the verdict could further fuel widespread demonstrations and rioting, and later Thursday, Catholic and Protestant groups skirmished in two parts of Belfast. However, the level of violence was significantly lower than on previous evenings.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With barbed wire and a 3-mile trench as deep as a grave, police and soldiers walled in the Catholic enclave of this Northern Irish town Saturday to protect it from its Protestant neighbors as the biggest test yet of a fragile peace deal here looms today. Protestant members of the Orange Order brotherhood have traditionally donned dark suits, bowler hats and orange sashes to march through town--and through the Catholic Garvaghy Road area--on July 5.
NEWS
November 1, 1998 | From Reuters
A Roman Catholic man was killed in Northern Ireland early Saturday in what appeared to be a slaying by Protestant Loyalists opposed to the province's peace process. Police said they were pursuing the possibility that members of the terrorist Loyalist Volunteer Force killed 35-year-old Brian Service, who was shot several times at close range in a north Belfast street. He died later in a hospital. Parties that draw their support from the Catholic community were quick to condemn the killing.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion rocked a Roman Catholic area of Belfast, injuring two men, officials said. The BBC cited "security sources" as saying an explosive device caused the blast. Northern Ireland police said it was not yet clear what prompted the bomb attack. The explosion came a day after a pro-British guerrilla group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters, threatened to end its six-year cease-fire unless Catholic republicans stopped attacking Protestants in Belfast, the provincial capital.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
British authorities on Thursday banned a second Protestant parade from passing through Roman Catholic territory, as the province suffered through a fifth straight night of tension between the rival factions. There were concerns that the verdict could further fuel widespread demonstrations and rioting, and later Thursday, Catholic and Protestant groups skirmished in two parts of Belfast. However, the level of violence was significantly lower than on previous evenings.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
British Prime Minister John Major had a tense meeting with leaders of Northern Ireland's main Roman Catholic party as he fought to revive a peace process stalled by the worst violence in years. Parliament members from the Social Democratic and Labor Party, leaving Major's Downing Street offices, said they had accused his government of capitulating to pressure from the majority Protestants in the province.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Protestant and Roman Catholic soccer fans rioted despite tight security at a Belfast stadium and police fired plastic bullets into the stands to subdue the unruly crowd. The violence spilled into surrounding streets as buses were hijacked and set on fire. The police had formed a barrier between fans of Linfield, which has only Protestant players, and Donegal Celtic, from a Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion rocked a Roman Catholic area of Belfast, injuring two men, officials said. The BBC cited "security sources" as saying an explosive device caused the blast. Northern Ireland police said it was not yet clear what prompted the bomb attack. The explosion came a day after a pro-British guerrilla group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters, threatened to end its six-year cease-fire unless Catholic republicans stopped attacking Protestants in Belfast, the provincial capital.
NEWS
July 5, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where religion and intolerance often walk hand in hand, the peaceful march by members of the Protestant Orange Order that took place Sunday was no small feat. The peace was carefully scripted, to be sure, secured by miles of barbed wire, hundreds of soldiers and police, and a ban on parading through a Roman Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
December 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams warned that Northern Ireland's peace accord "could bleed to death" if the stalemate over forming a new compromise government is not quickly overcome. Moderate Roman Catholic politicians joined Adams' party--the political arm of the Irish Republican Army--in blaming the impasse on Protestant leader David Trimble, who denied that any crisis lay ahead.
NEWS
November 1, 1998 | From Reuters
A Roman Catholic man was killed in Northern Ireland early Saturday in what appeared to be a slaying by Protestant Loyalists opposed to the province's peace process. Police said they were pursuing the possibility that members of the terrorist Loyalist Volunteer Force killed 35-year-old Brian Service, who was shot several times at close range in a north Belfast street. He died later in a hospital. Parties that draw their support from the Catholic community were quick to condemn the killing.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Two Northern Ireland police officers were injured Saturday as sporadic scuffles marred a traditional Protestant parade in this largely Catholic city. Police said a third officer went to his colleagues' rescue when he saw them being severely beaten and fired two shots in the air "to disperse the crowd and prevent further injury." Both officers, one with a bloodied forehead, were hospitalized in stable condition.
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sullen but defiant, Protestant Orangemen in this town pitched tents Sunday in the damp green fields outside a Roman Catholic area they have been banned from entering, threatening to stay there by the hundreds until they are allowed to parade down Garvaghy Road. The hard-line members of Portadown's Orange Order brotherhood are upset that the recent peace deal for Northern Ireland might strip them of their collective cultural and religious identity.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Two Northern Ireland police officers were injured Saturday as sporadic scuffles marred a traditional Protestant parade in this largely Catholic city. Police said a third officer went to his colleagues' rescue when he saw them being severely beaten and fired two shots in the air "to disperse the crowd and prevent further injury." Both officers, one with a bloodied forehead, were hospitalized in stable condition.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Protestant extremists claimed responsibility Wednesday for the slaying of a Roman Catholic teenager amid fears in this British province of a descent into more widespread violence over this weekend's disputed Protestant parade in Portadown. A passenger on a motorcycle fatally shot 19-year-old Ciaran Cummings in the town of Antrim--the first killing of its kind in Northern Ireland in more than a year.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With barbed wire and a 3-mile trench as deep as a grave, police and soldiers walled in the Catholic enclave of this Northern Irish town Saturday to protect it from its Protestant neighbors as the biggest test yet of a fragile peace deal here looms today. Protestant members of the Orange Order brotherhood have traditionally donned dark suits, bowler hats and orange sashes to march through town--and through the Catholic Garvaghy Road area--on July 5.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tensions rose in Northern Ireland after Protestants were banned Monday from marching--in the ceremonial garb of their Orange Order brotherhood--through a Catholic area next weekend. Keen to keep a power-sharing peace agreement for the troubled province on track, the British government has already sent an extra 1,000 troops to Northern Ireland to deal with possible violence during the Protestant "marching season."
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