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Cattle Rancher

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2003 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
Howard Blair has outlived two wives, endured years of searing drought and survived sudden freak storms that tossed massive boulders down the Providence Mountains toward his homestead. He lost his favorite horse to a bite from the deadly Mojave green rattlesnake. Now, he must decide whether to sell the ranch that has been in his family for generations or to stay and run the risk of financial ruin.
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FOOD
November 6, 2002 | Rod Smith, Special to The Times
HIGH above the northeast Napa Valley, one of California's original wine estates is being brought back to life by cowboys. Pat and Anne Stotesbury left Montana cattle ranching behind to grow Cabernet Sauvignon vines on the rugged flanks of Howell Mountain and make wine in a massive stone winery. The 1886 building dominates the mountain ridge like a ruined medieval castle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2002 | AMALIE YOUNG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four generations of Sharon Beck's family have braved the bitter winds in this valley ringed by the Blue Mountains, driving out coyotes and bears, and making the range safe for their livestock. Now Beck sees a new threat to her land--one she and other ranchers thought was wiped out in the 1930s: wild wolves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2001 | FOSTER KLUG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Every year they come in droves to southeastern Arizona on the trail of the world's smallest bird, what John James Audubon called a "glittering fragment of the rainbow." During the late-summer hummingbird season, thousands of tourists from around the world can be seen jockeying for position at the birds' well-known pit stops on the upper part of the "hummingbird highway"--the verdant corridor of land along the San Pedro River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2001 | From the Associated Press
The state's cowboys and ranchers are enduring a steep rise in mountain lion and coyote attacks on livestock, and blame a 1998 law banning certain kinds of animal traps for their woes. Recently released U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics show that last year 14,900 cattle and calves were killed by predators in California--up from 5,600 killed in 1995, an increase of nearly 170%. "A lot of it is due to an increase in the mountain lion population.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The relentless spread of foot-and-mouth disease among livestock in Europe has stirred alarm and dredged up bitter memories in agricultural communities across California, from northern cattle country to the vast industrial dairies of Chino. State officials estimate a broad outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease, a hardy virus that spreads quickly among animals, could cause more than $13.5 billion in damage to California's livestock producers and the dairy industry, the nation's biggest.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2000 | ELAINE ZINNGRABE
If Internet entrepreneurs had read this book before throwing millions of dollars into advertising, they could have invested a bit more into developing their actual products. "Deep Branding" starts with the basic tenet that a URL is not a brand and that a recognizable brand that has meaning to customers can't be built or bought overnight. Moreover, the book discusses how to use the Internet to augment, not replace, an existing business.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is that time of year again, when the unsuspecting get phone calls informing them that they've just won six-figure grants they didn't ask for. The 1998 MacArthur Fellowships have been awarded to 29 men and women, ranging from an ecologically minded Arizona cattle rancher to a moralist. The group includes eight Californians, three of whom are from the Los Angeles area: historian Mike Davis, attorney and Asian American advocate Stewart Kwoh, and linguistic anthropologist Elinor Ochs.
NEWS
April 24, 1998
Bir Narayan Chaudhuri, 141, honored as Nepal's oldest man, although he could not prove his age. Chaudhuri, a regular smoker, never made it into the Guinness Book of Records because he had no birth certificate or other documentation of his age. But Nepal's King Birendra recognized and honored him last year as the oldest man in the mountainous kingdom. A cattle rancher, Chaudhuri lived on a regular diet of vegetables, pork and rice.
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