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WORLD
May 4, 2010 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The man in the orange sunglasses and a fur hat with earflaps seemed more like a jazz musician on a cigarette break than a tribal chief, but as soon as he spoke, village men gathered for a lesson on brides, poor boys and cattle. The shade was just right. John Modi Jubek crossed his legs, striking as regal a pose as a chief can when he's sitting in a plastic chair. It was odd to him that a stranger didn't know the Mundari tribe smiles more upon tall women than on short ones. A father may love his diminutive daughters, but affection does not bring longhorns and riches.
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BUSINESS
April 15, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper
Two years after U.S. kosher-food authorities said they wanted to stop use of a cattle-killing method widely criticized as inhumane, the country's largest seller of kosher meat is importing beef from a South American plant that employs the technique, import records and an undercover video show.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2010 | By Greg Burns
With the economy and the weather slowly improving, the barbecue grill beckons. But the pork chops could be out of reach. Sticker shock is arriving at a supermarket meat case near you, as cattle, hog and poultry prices soar in speculator-influenced commodity markets. The upturn has put an end to a long downward spiral for livestock producers, who until recently have been losing money on every animal they brought to market. Given the recent strength in retail sales overall, U.S. consumers may be willing to pay a little more for their animal protein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Walter Plowright, the British veterinarian often called one of the "heroes of the 20th century" because of the massive increase in meat and dairy products resulting from his invention of a vaccine that has almost totally eliminated the cattle disease rinderpest, died Feb. 19 in London. He was 86. Most Americans have probably never heard of rinderpest, a virus in the same family as measles that causes one of the most lethal diseases in cattle. It never established a foothold in the Americas and was eliminated from Europe early in the 20th century, but its introduction to Africa in 1889 in cattle shipped from India caused what some consider the most catastrophic natural disaster ever to affect that continent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall
A rare Southern California butterfly and desert bighorn sheep have won a round in their contest for territory in the San Jacinto Mountains. National forest officials are rethinking the extent of cattle grazing on 51,000 acres in the San Jacintos that include habitat for the endangered quino checkerspot butterfly and the peninsular bighorn sheep. In response to appeals by environmental groups, the U.S. Forest Service withdrew one decision and reversed another involving the renewal of grazing allotments on San Bernardino National Forest lands.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2009 | By DeeDee Correll
Manuel A. Sanchez has ruled out every logical explanation for the fate that has befallen the calves on his ranch in southern Colorado. Over the past month, he's found four calves dead in a way that he cannot reconcile with anything in his 50 years of raising cattle: eyes and ears missing, tongues and genitals excised in what appeared to be a series of fine cuts. Mountain lions, bears or coyotes would leave messier marks, he said. And Sanchez found no tire tracks or footprints that would suggest a human invader -- nor even bloodstains he'd expect to find around the carcasses if someone had butchered them.
WORLD
November 27, 2009 | By Edmund Sanders
Have the climate wars of Africa begun? Tales of conflict emerging from this remote, arid region of Kenya have disturbing echoes of the lethal building blocks that turned Darfur into a killing ground in western Sudan. Tribes that lived side by side for decades say they've been pushed to warfare by competition for disappearing water and pasture. The government is accused of exacerbating tensions by taking sides and arming combatants who once used spears and arrows. The aim, all sides say, is no longer just to steal land or cattle, but to drive the enemy away forever.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
A fight is brewing over the practice of feeding chicken feces and other poultry farm waste to cattle. A coalition of food and consumer groups that includes Consumers Union and the Center for Science in the Public Interest has asked the Food and Drug Administration to ban the practice. McDonald's Corp., the nation's largest restaurant user of beef, also wants the FDA to prohibit the feeding of so-called poultry litter to cattle. Members of the coalition are threatening to file a lawsuit or to push for federal legislation establishing such a ban if the FDA doesn't act to do so in the coming months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2009 | Emma Brown, Brown writes for the Washington Post.
Clifford P. Hansen, a cattle rancher who became Wyoming's governor and then served two terms as a U.S. senator, has died. He was 97. Hansen died at his home Tuesday after receiving hospital treatment for a broken pelvis. A Republican, he served as governor from 1963 to 1967, when he went to Washington after defeating Teno Roncalio, Wyoming's only congressman and a Democrat, in a bid for the Senate. Hansen sat on the Senate Finance and Veterans Affairs committees and was a ranking member of the Natural Resources Committee.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2009 | Kate Linthicum
Troy McKinney was sitting in his truck outside the Decatur Livestock Market when he got a call about four heifers gone missing from a ranch in Hunt County. He sighed, spit a wad of chewing tobacco into a Styrofoam cup, and took out a notebook and a pen. "How much did them heifers weigh?" he asked the rancher. "Any kind of markings on 'em? You got any suspects? You made anyone mad or anything lately?" News of another cattle theft was the last thing McKinney wanted to hear. The livestock theft investigator for several north Texas counties was already knee-deep in nine other cattle-rustling cases.
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