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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1992
A club for students of European descent at Polytechnic High School in Long Beach can keep the name "Caucasian Ancestry Club," the school's Community Interracial Council decided this week. The council's 12-10 vote to allow the name followed a meeting at which some students and administrators argued that Caucasian is a racially charged word, similar to Aryan. They said they feared that the club, which has about 45 members, might be seen as a white supremacy group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Urumqi, China ? Almost invariably when visitors approach the middle-aged woman enshrined in a climatized exhibit case in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region Museum, they pause and do a double take. What gets the most attention is her nose: high-bridged, slightly hooked, the sort of nose that reminds you of Meryl Streep. Then a little gasp. " Weiguoren!" (A foreigner!), one young woman exclaimed to her friends. They were touring the museum earlier this month on a Chinese public holiday.
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BUSINESS
March 29, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Three former Fujitsu Systems of America employees have filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against their former employer and its Japanese parent, alleging that they were discriminated against on the basis of race and national origin.
SPORTS
February 18, 2009 | Daniel Wexler
For as long as golf has been contested professionally, there have been "opens" -- that is, events in which all golfers, amateur or professional, skilled enough to play their way through qualifying, can earn the right to participate against the world's best. Such was the body of the advertisement, at least. But for many years, the fine print told a different story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the temporary segregation of prisoners at a racially tense county jail ending this week, white inmates say they fear that a spate of attacks by blacks touched off by the not-guilty verdicts in the Rodney King beating case will start again. Whites represent less than 13% of the nearly 10,000 inmates housed at the Peter J. Pitchess Honor Rancho near Castaic, where the worst jail rioting in the county broke out a few hours after the not-guilty verdicts were announced.
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a slow day at the Arcade Barbershop that serves Ladera Heights, an affluent community of several thousand homes tucked between Culver City and Inglewood. A handful of long-time customers, all of them white, trickle in for an old-fashioned haircut, to listen to a radio playing music from the 1930s and '40s and talk about how the neighborhood is changing. "A Greek fellow, an old-timer who lived down the street from me, moved the other day," one elderly customer says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2000 | SOREN BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Mission: Impossible 2" may have pulled off one stunt that's even more daring than anything John Woo concocted with motorcycles or cars--the on-screen interracial romance between Tom Cruise and Thandie Newton. In society at large the idea of someone like Cruise having an intimate relationship with Newton may not seem so remarkable, but when he appears as Ethan Hunt with Newton at his side in "M:I-2," it's somewhat revolutionary.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black staff members working for Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's campaign complain that they lack influential input into its daily operations, a problem they say has fostered mixed messages and scheduling mishaps that have undercut Clinton's effort to build support within the black community. Such discord, coming amid a continuing dispute between Clinton and the Rev. Jesse Jackson, the nation's most prominent black leader, raises questions about the racial dynamic within the campaign team.
NEWS
August 25, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
N. Stephen Vallance served as a Los Angeles police officer for 10 years, winning commendations and the respect of his peers and supervisors. He never took a suspension day in his career, and when he left the department in 1991 it was because he wanted to see a little of the country and try raising his son in a safer environment. Vallance could not stay away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 40 years since Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" was first published, it has evolved into a key classroom tool for teachers trying to engage students in such issues as racism, intolerance and the personal cost of taking a moral stand. Yet some educators have been taking a more critical view of the novel, which explores attempts by fictional white lawyer Atticus Finch to defend a black man wrongly accused of rape, and of the lessons it contains for the classroom.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2008 | Peter Wallsten and Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writers
With the Democratic presidential race about to enter another crucial phase of voting, Barack Obama has launched a newly aggressive strategy to undermine two pillars of support for rival Hillary Rodham Clinton: Latinos and working-class white voters. Each is an important constituency in major March 4 primaries -- Latinos in Texas and blue-collar workers in Ohio -- which many believe Clinton must win to keep her White House hopes alive.
OPINION
January 14, 2007 | Joe Queenan, JOE QUEENAN writes frequently for Barron's, the New York Times Book Review and the Guardian.
THE RELEASE OF Edward Zwick's majestic "Blood Diamond" is a bittersweet moment for film buffs, bringing to an end the stunning "Just Let Bwana Do It!" series that began with "The Interpreter" and "The Constant Gardener." In each of these movies, beleaguered black folks marooned in forlorn, blood-drenched African nations get to see justice done because of the heroic efforts of some truly fabulous white people. "White Folks to the Rescue!"
BUSINESS
October 15, 2004 | From Reuters
U.S. lenders turned down more black and Latino borrowers for mortgages than whites last year at a rate comparable to 10 years ago, a study by a consumer group says. This lending gap had narrowed from 1993 to 1998 but has grown in the last year despite historically low mortgage rates, according to the Assn. of Community Organizations for Reform Now. Blacks were 2.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
A student group at Roger Williams University in Bristol is offering a scholarship for which only white students are eligible, a move they say is designed to protest affirmative action. The application for the $250 award requires an essay on "why you are proud of your white heritage" and a recent picture to "confirm whiteness." Jason Mattera, 20, president of the College Republicans, the group offering the scholarship, said the group is parodying minority scholarships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Minority voting rates statewide are so low that by 2040, when nonwhites will be two-thirds of the population, whites could still represent a majority of voters, an analysis shows. The analysis reinforces past findings that black and Latino voter rates are stunted by lower socioeconomic status and citizenship rates -- but voting by Asians, who tend to be relatively well off, is surprisingly low.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2002 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Ellen Burton-Christie is angry about the way Roman Catholic leaders have handled the church's sex scandals, and she used her weekly offering Sunday to express her displeasure: She wrote "parish only" on her check, withholding her money from the Los Angeles Archdiocese in an attempt to spark change in the church hierarchy. Salvador Hernandez said he was saddened, not angered, by the scandals and would not take it out on the archdiocese.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON
It was just after 7 a.m., and King News was looking anything but royal. The strain of producing several newscasts while most people were still sleeping was evident as King sipped coffee in a small, spare studio at KDAY-AM, the voice of rap in Southern California. Suddenly, with a flick of a switch on the console in front of him, King's face and eyes brightened. He turned to the microphone and declared in a deep, authoritative tone that demands your attention: "I'm KING NEWS . . .
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | LARRY GORDON and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Multiculturalism. Political correctness. Affirmative action. Ethnic studies. Diversity. Separatism. Harassment. The Western tradition. Just the mention of those buzzwords is likely to provoke emotional and divisive debates at most colleges. But behind the arguments is a deeper dilemma--how to ensure minorities access to higher education while promoting ethnic harmony on campuses--and a deepening reality--that universities have become a focal point for the nation's racial tensions.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Riot police restored calm to the town of Burnley in northwestern England early today after a flare-up of racial tensions between whites and Asians. Several cars and two buildings were set on fire. The police, backed by a helicopter, were deployed to keep groups of white and Asian youths apart in the town, 20 miles northwest of Oldham--scene last month of Britain's worst race riots in a decade.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The numbers that flowed from Census 2000 last week were breathtaking in their description of how Latinos and Asians had displaced whites and African Americans in Southern California. But put the five-county region under a microscope and narrow your focus. Go below the county level, below the city level, down to the census-tract level, where a few thousand people live, where change was experienced subtly, slowly, sometimes imperceptibly, over 3,652 days.
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