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NEWS
April 5, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh said Wednesday that he would oppose this year's major piece of civil rights legislation, even as President Bush praised Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and pledged "to live up to the highest ideals of the civil rights movement." Thornburgh said he will recommend vetoing a bill that would overturn five Supreme Court decisions limiting protections against job discrimination.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1991
Two more Canyon Country youths were arrested in the stabbing and beating of a 16-year-old student at Canyon High School, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said Tuesday. One youth was arrested several hours after the Friday incident, which led to increased tensions between Latino and Anglo students at the suburban high school. The two other boys, both 16-year-old Canyon High School students, were in custody Tuesday at Sylmar Juvenile Hall on suspicion of attempted murder, Sgt.
SPORTS
July 4, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Nearly twice the percentage of white athletes as blacks graduated from college the last five years, according to a study by the NCAA. The findings, released Wednesday, are the first part of an academic study of 3,288 athletes from 85 Division I schools who entered college in 1984 and 1985. Black athletes graduated at a 26.6% rate, compared to 52.2% for whites and 45.7% for all athletes. The women's rate was almost 54%, compared with the men's 42.3%.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
Small businesses owned by Anglo males had far greater revenues than those owned by minorities and women during the 1980s economic boom, a Census Bureau report said Wednesday. Anglo males' small businesses on average had $189,000 in receipts in 1987, more than double the average for owners from any other group except Asian-Pacific Islander males. "I think some of it has to do with the industries they're in," said Donna McCutcheon, the survey manager.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
A drug-use survey of students nationwide found that white high school seniors are more apt to abuse drugs than black seniors, according to figures released Monday. "It goes against conventional wisdom--particularly television has portrayed the problem of drug abuse in the United States as a black, inner-city problem," said Doug Hall, vice president of the national Parents' Resource Institute for Drug Education Inc.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents here remember the Blizzard of '79 as cold, inconvenient and burdensome, but, ultimately, just a lot of snow. They also remember that, when then-Mayor Michael A. Bilandic failed to remove that snow from the streets promptly, the citizens marched to the polls and booted him out of office in an astounding political upset. In the 11 years since, Chicagoans have endured five strikes by teachers and watched as their school system became known as the worst in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Older whites are 3 1/2 times more likely than older blacks to receive potentially lifesaving surgery to bypass a blocked coronary artery, according to a new study that offers striking evidence of a wide racial gap in access to medical care. The study, based on more than 86,000 coronary artery bypass graft surgeries performed under the Medicare program, found that the gap was widest in Southeastern states, where whites were more than six times as likely to have the operation as blacks.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There it was on the Internet: an invitation to a "dialogue on whiteness," a two-day workshop in New Jersey sponsored by a pint-sized nonprofit organization called the Center for the Study of White American Culture. Images of race-baiting rednecks sprang to mind. At first, underwriters were reluctant even to provide insurance for the conference, on the assumption this was some sort of unsavory, high-risk gathering.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1989 infant mortality rate in the United States was the lowest in its history, Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan announced Thursday, but he warned that "we must do better." The rate was 9.7 per 1,000 live births, 2% lower than the previous year, the department said. However, federal health officials and other analysts emphasized that the rate of decline in recent years has slowed, particularly for black infants, who have a mortality rate twice that of white babies.
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