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NEWS
March 31, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The striking white exodus that touched almost every part of Southern California in the 1990s was an aberration caused by the decade's seesaw economy, not the first stitch of a pattern, demographers said Friday. The five-county region's white population dropped by more than 840,000, or 11.7%, in the last decade, according to 2000 census results released Thursday. It was part of a shift that made California the nation's first large state without a racial or ethnic majority.
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NEWS
September 13, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a recent visit to a Rotary Club in suburban Westchester County, Hillary Rodham Clinton joked that when she drove past a nearby Saks Fifth Avenue store, "my heart started to beat. If I talk a little faster and leave a little early, you'll know where to find me." The comment might have seemed like a throwaway line, but there was also calculation behind it: In her tight race for the U.S.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
More Latinos and blacks are taking college entrance exams than ever before, but their average scores are dropping further below those of their Asian American and white classmates, the College Board reported Tuesday. The growing gap along ethnic lines in the last decade disturbs some educators, who fear that Latinos and blacks will have an even tougher time competing for the limited number of seats at the nation's most selective colleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 40 years since Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" was first published, it has evolved into a key classroom tool for teachers trying to engage students in such issues as racism, intolerance and the personal cost of taking a moral stand. Yet some educators have been taking a more critical view of the novel, which explores attempts by fictional white lawyer Atticus Finch to defend a black man wrongly accused of rape, and of the lessons it contains for the classroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2000 | SOREN BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Mission: Impossible 2" may have pulled off one stunt that's even more daring than anything John Woo concocted with motorcycles or cars--the on-screen interracial romance between Tom Cruise and Thandie Newton. In society at large the idea of someone like Cruise having an intimate relationship with Newton may not seem so remarkable, but when he appears as Ethan Hunt with Newton at his side in "M:I-2," it's somewhat revolutionary.
NEWS
April 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
About 200 armed black squatters occupied another white-owned farm and police let them stay Sunday, warning them not to use violence. Squatters and ruling party supporters have seized about 1,000 white-owned farms in what they say is a protest against unequal land distribution; critics call the actions a bid by Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe to rally supporters and intimidate opponents.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | From Reuters
Key southern African leaders have rallied behind President Robert Mugabe, urging the West to provide funds for land redistribution and defuse the mounting political crisis in Zimbabwe. Presidents Thabo Mbeki of South Africa, Sam Nujoma of Namibia and Joaquim Chissano of Mozambique said after talks with Mugabe at Victoria Falls on Friday that Western governments should make good on their promise at a 1998 donor conference to finance land reform.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
After a week of heightened violence on white-owned farms across Zimbabwe, a leader of squatters occupying the properties pledged Wednesday to end hostilities--but not to leave the land. Squatters would remain in place while their leaders work peaceably toward a negotiated end to the 2-month-old occupations, said Chenjerai Hunzvi, leader of a group of veterans of Zimbabwe's independence war that initially led the farm invasions.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Zimbabwe's leader vilified white farmers as "enemies of our people" Tuesday, hours after dozens of gunmen besieged a farm and killed a white rancher during the worst spasm of violence in two months of land occupations. On the 20th anniversary of the nation's independence from white rule, President Robert Mugabe accused the farmers of "mobilizing, actually coercing" their workers against his rule and wanting to turn the clock back to the colonial era.
NEWS
April 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
Despite the killing of a farmer and the severe beatings of five others, President Robert Mugabe on Sunday defended the takeovers of white-owned farms by armed black squatters whom he portrayed as heroes fighting inequality in land ownership. Mugabe's comments, which came a day after two opposition party members were killed in a firebomb attack in this former British colony, contradicted an appeal by his government Thursday for the squatters to abandon the plots.
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