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NEWS
April 17, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
At a time when the Internet is growing faster than any other communications system in history, there is a "troubling" racial divide in how readily blacks can access the global computer network, researchers said Thursday. In the first survey of its kind, a team of Vanderbilt University management experts compared computer use among whites and African Americans.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
It looked so familiar--the gloves, the stocking cap, the black defendant, claiming his innocence against the testimony of a white cop who some jurors had trouble believing. But this wasn't the O.J. Simpson trial that we jurors were hearing in Department M of the Santa Monica courthouse. We were called on to judge the case of the People vs.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There it was on the Internet: an invitation to a "dialogue on whiteness," a two-day workshop in New Jersey sponsored by a pint-sized nonprofit organization called the Center for the Study of White American Culture. Images of race-baiting rednecks sprang to mind. At first, underwriters were reluctant even to provide insurance for the conference, on the assumption this was some sort of unsavory, high-risk gathering.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1996 | From Reuters
Managers and other professionals whose career mentors are white males earn about $16,800 a year more than those guided up the corporate ladder by female or minority mentors, a study has found. "Developing mentoring relationships seems to be related to salary attainment," said George Dreher, professor of business administration at Indiana University in Bloomington and a co-author of the study. "Access to a white, male mentor is particularly important."
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | ERICH SMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For up to 4,000 years, the salty sand of the Taklimakan Desert in China held a secret--unusually well-preserved mummies wearing colorful robes, boots, stockings and hats. Today, the mummies still hold a mystery: The people were Caucasian, not Asian. "We are trying to figure out, from many different angles, who these people were and where they came from," Dr. Victor H. Mair said. "It's important to the question of how civilization developed across Eurasia."
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a slow day at the Arcade Barbershop that serves Ladera Heights, an affluent community of several thousand homes tucked between Culver City and Inglewood. A handful of long-time customers, all of them white, trickle in for an old-fashioned haircut, to listen to a radio playing music from the 1930s and '40s and talk about how the neighborhood is changing. "A Greek fellow, an old-timer who lived down the street from me, moved the other day," one elderly customer says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1995 | Todd Coleman, Todd Coleman is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles
A funny thing happened at the test screenings of "White Man's Burden," the race-bending John Travolta-Harry Belafonte drama that opens nationwide Friday: The audience laughed. Or rather, half the audience. At back-to-back screenings on July 5--same cut, same theater, but with one an all-African American audience and one an all-white audience--the filmmakers and executives said that at first they were baffled by the wildly different reactions of the two groups.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was after 1 a.m. when the Ford Heights police impounded Richard Will's car and arrested the friend who'd been driving--he was wanted for failing to pay child support. They left Will, who had had a drink or two, stranded in the nation's poorest suburb, in a neighborhood frequented by drug dealers and gangs. Fifteen minutes later, police responding to a call about a prone person on fire saw Will again. He'd been beaten, doused with lighter fluid and set aflame.
NEWS
September 2, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They rode up from South Africa in heavily loaded Toyota pickups, not covered wagons pulled by oxen. And they traveled on potholed pavement, not dirt tracks in a cruel wilderness. But the six Afrikaners who rode past tall gum trees and rustling savanna grass into this dusty farming community on a recent bone-dry afternoon were following their forebears on a familiar trail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1995 | GREG KRIKORIAN and ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He may be the most discredited former police officer in the country. And his words, in a jarring audiotape, have sickened many, including those who wear the badge he once did. But when former Los Angeles Police Detective Mark Fuhrman portrayed Torrance as the region's lone white bastion, more than a few people were willing to agree.
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