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NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
As results from the Nevada Republican presidential caucuses trickle in, tallies from one county - a big one - are notably tardy. Clark County, home to the state's main population center of Las Vegas, is holding a special post-sundown caucus to accommodate orthodox Jews and Seventh-day Adventists, which has delayed the release of results from the county until after 7 p.m. local time. In the meantime, results are out from the other 16 counties. They're being posted to a Google map and the Nevada GOP's twitter feed (@nvgop)
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OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A California bill to require the disclosure of so-called dark money - campaign expenditures funneled through nonprofit organizations to hide donors' identities - became the first casualty of the Democrats' losing their supermajority in the Legislature. Not a single Republican senator backed the bill, so it has stalled. And there are other important bills that will stay on the back burner unless the Democrats begin to negotiate and Republicans come off the margins to legislate again. Californians may have been lulled into thinking that partisan gridlock in Sacramento was over after the Legislature passed a number of significant bills last year, including one to raise the minimum wage, another to provide driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants and a third that regulated fracking.
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NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Michael J. Mishak
When Rabbi Shea Harlig took in the packed room at a special evening caucus for Republicans who observe a Saturday sabbath, he couldn't believe his eyes. While it was standing room only, few donned religious garb. "I didn't realize there were so many orthodox Jews and Seventh Day Adventists living in Las Vegas," he said wryly. There aren't. Unless "Ron Paul" is a religion. The Texas congressman's "revolution" stormed a special caucus at a private school in a tony suburb on the edge of Las Vegas, set up by Clark County GOP officials for those who couldn't caucus with the rest of the state Saturday morning for religious reasons.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
DES MOINES - For more than 40 years, Iowa voters have played a vital role in picking the nation's president, culling the field of hopefuls and helping launch a fortunate handful all the way to the White House. For about 35 of those years, Iowa has been the target of jealousy and scorn, mainly from outsiders who say the state, the first to vote in the presidential contest, is too white and too rural; that its caucuses, precinct-level meetings of party faithful, are too quirky and too exclusionary to play such a key role in the nominating process.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By James Oliphant
The Nevada caucuses didn't match up to the Super Bowl. While the Giants and Patriots tussled in a tight contest decided in the final few minutes, Mitt Romney blew out his competition the previous evening. The final numbers, released Monday morning, showed the extent of Romney's dominance. Romney took one out of every two votes. Remember when the talk was that the former Massachusetts governor couldn't get above 25% anywhere? His rivals never drew close: Newt Gingrich finished second at 21%, Ron Paul garnered 19%, and Rick Santorum just 10%. The GOP presidential frontrunner had long expected to do well in the state, with its strong Mormon vote and urbanized Las Vegas core.
NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Maria L. LaGanga
Pity poor Rick Santorum. The patriotic Pahrumpers from Precinct 31 had crowded into Mrs. Odegard's sixth-grade classroom at Rosemary Clark Middle School this morning to talk politics. First they were scheduled to hear a short speech on behalf of each of the would-be Republican presidential nominees. Then they would fill out blue paper ballots and tuck them into the cardboard ballot box to pick the man they want to see post up against President Obama come November. The way the Nevada caucuses work, candidate speeches are given by loyal local supporters out to persuade their neighbors one last time before the vote begins.
NEWS
March 17, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Call it a “bloodbath,” call it “mass hysteria,” or just call it a presidential caucus.   Call it what you want, but a day of electoral uncertainty in Missouri has proven what many already knew: The Show-Me State won't be showing its cards in the Republican president-making game any time soon.   “Vote your conscience!” Rick Santorum told a crowd in St. Louis on Saturday morning before hustling off to several other bite-sized campaign stops, all to snipe at Romney and shore up support in a state he'd already swept in a nonbinding February primary.
NEWS
March 10, 2012 | By John Hoeffel
Hundreds of Republicans turned out on a crisp, clear Saturday in the state's largest city to cast votes in a presidential contest that could influence the drawn-out race, likely giving Rick Santorum bragging rights as he competes to win Tuesday in Alabama and Mississippi. In a possible preview of the results from the Sedgwick County caucus, Gov. Sam Brownback asked the crowd which candidate they supported. Santorum won the loudest cheers. "Kansas matters this year in the presidential race," he said, describing the caucus as "the largest Republican gathering in the state this year and maybe ever in Sedgwick County.
NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Mitt Romney jumped to a commanding lead Saturday in preliminary results from the Nevada caucuses, positioning him for a big win in the first Western contest of the Republican presidential race. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Rep. Ron Paul of Texas were locked in a fight for second place, with former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum far behind in fourth. A victory would be the second in less than a week for Romney, following his big win in Florida's primary on Tuesday, and the third the former Massachusetts governor has posted in the five nominating contests so far. At stake were 28 delegates to this summer's Republican National Convention, awarded on a proportional basis.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By James Oliphant
Rick Santorum's supporters eyed the TV screen, watched the returns roll in - and they still couldn't quite believe it. “This is beyond my wildest dreams, “ exclaimed Matt Schultz, Iowa's secretary of state, who endorsed Santorum just a month ago. With about half of Iowa's precincts reporting, Santorum was in a dead heat with Mitt Romney, with Ron Paul slightly behind. A matter of weeks ago, the former Pennsylvania senator appeared dead in the water, on course to finish near the bottom of the field.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Stripped of all his committee assignments, state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon (D-Montebello) said Monday he will focus more attention on issues in his Los Angeles County district while awaiting the end of an FBI investigation into bribery allegations. “It will give me an opportunity to work with the district, telling people what services are available from the state,” Calderon told reporters after the Senate held its first meeting of the year. FBI agents raided Calderon's Capitol office in June as part of an investigation that an FBI affidavit says is focused on whether Calderon took $88,000 in bribes in exchange for action on bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- State Sen. Ronald S. Calderon (D-Montebello) has been removed from the executive board of the California Latino Legislative Caucus, the group's chairman said Tuesday. Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) noted it has been a banner year for the caucus he chairs, which won approval of several immigration bills including one allowing driver's licenses for immigrants who entered the country illegally. “Unfortunately, recent allegations against one of our caucus members, Sen. Ron Calderon, threaten to overshadow our accomplishments and undermine the integrity of the caucus as a whole,” Lara said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- A nonprofit group formed by former Assemblyman Tom Calderon received $25,000 this year from a group tied to the California Latino Legislative Caucus just after his brother, Sen. Ronald S. Calderon (D-Montebello) ended a term as vice chairman of the caucus. The contribution is raising eyebrows around the Capitol. It was made by a political committee called “Yes We Can” to Californians for Diversity, a nonprofit group whose last tax filing, for 2011, listed Tom Calderon as president and said he received $2,500 in compensation from it that year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- A group of activists representing gun owners said Thursday that they may launch recall campaigns against a handful of Democratic lawmakers, including Assembly Speaker John Pérez (D-Los Angeles), over the passage of several gun-control laws this year. A final decision on which lawmakers will be targeted is weeks away, according to Sam Paredes, executive director of Gun Owners of California. He said Tim Knight, who was part of a successful recall effort in Colorado, is advising Californians on a strategy, along with experts such as Jennifer Kerns.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - President Obama's hopes of winning congressional approval for a U.S. military strike on Syria could come down to the persuasion skills of House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, a San Francisco liberal who was a leading critic of the war in Iraq. With a nod to the historical irony, she is arguing to her Democratic colleagues that Syria is different from the earlier conflict. She spoke passionately in an interview about the "human rights catastrophe" in Syria, saying a "limited, targeted" attack "that will be over fast" could prevent the future use of weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve
WASHINGTON -- Tracy Martin, the father of slain Florida teenager Trayvon Martin, urged Congress on Wednesday to improve the educational and employment opportunities of African American boys and men, who are disproportionately imprisoned and unemployed. “I always say that Trayvon was my hero,” said Martin. “He saved my life, and not to be there in his time of need is real troublesome.” When he was 9, Trayvon pulled his immobilized father from a fire that started in their kitchen and called 911. Martin, who recently started an anti-gun-violence foundation with Trayvon's mother, Sybrina Fulton, said President Obama's impromptu remarks Friday, during which he shared his own experiences with racial stereotypes, “spark[ed]
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Seema Mehta and Michael A. Memoli
Mitt Romney readied for the next phase of the GOP campaign Wednesday after the narrowest of victories in Tuesday's Iowa caucuses, boarding his campaign charter flight to New Hampshire to hugs and cheers from his staff. Romney, running on just two hours sleep after a longer-than-expected vote count, acknowledged the slim margin of victory as he spoke with reporters before taking off. "I think landslides are terrific. I just didn't see that in last night's figures," he said. The former Massachusetts governor said he and his family learned of his eight-vote win in the first nomination fight of the 2012 race from their hotel suite.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Officials for the state Senate said Wednesday that a second office searched by FBI agents the day before was an overflow office for state Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello), not the office of the Latino Legislative Caucus as previously announced . Senate Sergeant at Arms Tony Beard Jr. had said Tuesday that the caucus offices in the Legislative Office Building were searched along with the main office of Calderon in the Capitol. The search took place in an overflow room Calderon maintained in Room 592 at the Legislative Office Building, not Room 511, where the caucus operates, according to Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Anthony York and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - FBI agents searched offices in the Capitol on Tuesday - the first such raid in 25 years - serving warrants and carting away evidence in what law enforcement officials said was a corruption probe that began in Los Angeles County. As the agents combed the offices of state Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello) and the Latino Legislative Caucus into the evening, a federal law enforcement source said Calderon, a member of the caucus, was "the focus of the investigation.
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