Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCave
IN THE NEWS

Cave

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011
'Cave of Forgotten Dreams' MPAA rating: G Running time: 1 hour, 30 minutes Playing: At ArcLight Cinemas, Hollywood
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Talk about clingy! A newly discovered cave insect can copulate for up to 70 hours, possibly because the female has a "penis-like" sexual organ that penetrates deeply into her male partner, anchoring him for the duration, scientists say. In a paper published recently in the journal Current Biology, researchers described the exotic sexual characteristics of Neotrogla , a genus of winged insects that inhabit guano-speckled Brazilian caves....
Advertisement
SCIENCE
September 17, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Deep in a Croatian cave, scientists have discovered a tiny snail with a shell that looks as if it is made of glass. The Zospeum tholussum specimen was found more than half a mile beneath the Earth's surface, in the  Lukina Jama-Trojama cave system, one of the 20 deepest cave systems in the world.  The snail is minuscule -- just 1 millimeter across. It is part of a group of snails generally found along the drainage systems of caves. Like its Zospeum cousins , Zospeum tholussum has limited eyesight and mobility, according to researchers.  "Since they are grazing microorganisms from stones, mud and wood that has been washed into the cave, they have everything around that they need," said Alexander Weigand of Goethe-University in Frankfurt, Germany, who described the snail in the journal Subterranean Biology.
TRAVEL
March 21, 2014 | By David Kelly
GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo.  - Since moving to Colorado from Southern California three years ago, I've come to hate winter. Scalding baths, wool blankets, the dog snoozing on my feet - nothing takes the edge off the bitter cold. It lingers in the air, in the bones and, most of all, in the soul. Then a friend told me about a place three hours from Denver guaranteed to rocket my moribund core temperature through the roof. I set off on a dark January morning in a raging blizzard.
SCIENCE
December 4, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Ongoing excavation of a collapsed rock shelter that was used by Neanderthals suggests that our extinct human relatives organized their living spaces according to tasks, researchers say. In a paper published recently in the Canadian Journal of Archeology, researchers examined artifacts recovered at Riparo Bombrini, in northwest Italy, and concluded that their dwelling was organized around such activities as butchering animals, shaping tools and...
SCIENCE
January 23, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Let's be clear: That Harvard scientist you heard about is NOT seeking an "adventurous woman" to give birth to a "cloned cave baby. " But that was the juicy story making its way around Web on Tuesday . The blowup began when the German magazine Der Spiegel published an interview with Harvard synthetic biologist George Church, who is well-known for his genome sequencing effort, the Personal Genome Project, and for all sorts of other unusual and...
SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Talk about clingy! A newly discovered cave insect can copulate for up to 70 hours, possibly because the female has a "penis-like" sexual organ that penetrates deeply into her male partner, anchoring him for the duration, scientists say. In a paper published recently in the journal Current Biology, researchers described the exotic sexual characteristics of Neotrogla , a genus of winged insects that inhabit guano-speckled Brazilian caves....
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Do you like prehistoric cave paintings? No? Well, I do, and so the news that many of those paintings were apparently done by women is fascinating. Not only for what it says about our ancestors but for what it says about archeology. Writing for National Geographic, Virginia Hughes reported recently : Women made most of the oldest-known cave art paintings, suggests a new analysis of ancient handprints. Most scholars had assumed these ancient artists were predominantly men, so the finding overturns decades of archaeological dogma.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Between wrapping her 124-date world tour in January and promoting her new 3-D movie, Katy Perry has had an unrelenting schedule this year. And that's not even taking into account her pending divorce from comedian Russell Brand, which it seems the pop star has barely had time to process. So it's no surprise that at the premiere of her documentary, "Katy Perry: Part of Me," the 27-year-old acknowledged she couldn't wait to go on a vacation. "I think I'm gonna go into a cave after this," the musician said while standing on a pink carpet Tuesday afternoon, before performing an eight-song set for around 5,000 screaming fans on Hollywood Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The Chumash tribe has expressed interest in buying a 450-acre slice of a contaminated nuclear research facility in the hills between the Simi and San Fernando valleys, hoping to preserve a cave that its members consider sacred. The tribe's inquiries about acquiring part of the 2,849-acre Santa Susana Field Laboratory have stirred concern among some residents who fear the purchase might be a back door to building a casino. "I very much respect their desire to protect sacred sites but I want to make sure any such action precludes the establishment of a casino," Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks said.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
CORNUCOPIA, Wis. - On some days, Kevin Hunt stands at his Star North gas station in this eye-blink of a town on mighty Lake Superior, marveling at Mother Nature and his own dumb luck. Everywhere he looks: ice and people. Months ago, many warned him not to invest in a place where fair-weather tourists flee in the fall and the big lake's waters turn cold and storm-tossed, forcing the 100 or so hardy full-time residents of Cornucopia to hibernate for the winter. He'd be out of business by March, they said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
The film “20,000 Days On Earth” is that rare thing, a movie that is hard to classify. Even describing it is difficult to do. Screening as part of the World Cinema Documentary Competition at Sundance, it is a document of the recording of Nick Cave's most recent album “Push the Sky Away,” an intimate look at his life, creative process and where his mind is at now, as well as a burnishment of his carefully crafted persona as lover man, wild...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before figuring out who should coach the Redskins next. The Skinny: This time last year, I was excited about the Redskins making the playoffs. Now I'm just excited that I won't have to watch them lose every Sunday for another nine months. It will be a short week for the Morning Fix as much of the industry is still on holiday and soon I will be joining them. Monday's headlines include box-office recaps for the weekend and the year. Also, A&E caves on "Duck Dynasty.
SCIENCE
December 17, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Stocky, sturdy and strong, Neanderthals may also have been sentimental. A new study suggests our closest, extinct human relatives took the time to bury their dead as much as 50,000 years ago. The findings, published in the journal PNAS,  add to a picture of Neanderthals as being more culturally sophisticated than previously believed. "For years there was a huge debate among anthropologists about how complex the Neanderthals' thoughts actually were," said William Rendu, lead author of the study and a researcher at the Center for International Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences in New York.
SCIENCE
December 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Not so long ago, the cute and curious ring-tailed lemurs of southwestern Madagascar had scientists stumped. Each morning, for about a week, the scientists would arrive in a forest they knew to be populated by ring-tailed lemurs to find the small primates seeming to materialize out of nowhere. Then the scientists would watch as the lemurs went about their business -- wrapping their arms and tails around each other to form a "lemur ball" for warmth, and then going out to eat baby birds, insects or whatever they could find.
SCIENCE
December 4, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Ongoing excavation of a collapsed rock shelter that was used by Neanderthals suggests that our extinct human relatives organized their living spaces according to tasks, researchers say. In a paper published recently in the Canadian Journal of Archeology, researchers examined artifacts recovered at Riparo Bombrini, in northwest Italy, and concluded that their dwelling was organized around such activities as butchering animals, shaping tools and...
SCIENCE
February 28, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Geologists, biologists and other scientists convened this week in Paris to discuss fungus stains that threaten France's prehistoric Lascaux cave drawings. Black stains have spread across the cave's murals of bulls, felines and other images, and scientists have been hard-pressed to halt their creep. Rising temperatures have complicated matters by stopping air from circulating inside the caverns, said Marc Gauthier, who heads the Lascaux Caves International Scientific Committee.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The remains of 58 people, believed to be non-Serbian civilians, have been exhumed from a cave in northwestern Bosnia-Herzegovina and at a site near Sarajevo, the capital, said Amor Masovic, the head of the Muslim-Croat Commission for Missing Persons. The remains of 41 victims, most of them presumed to have been killed in a Serbian prison camp during the 1992-95 Bosnian war, were retrieved from the cave near the town of Bosanska Krupa, about 130 miles northwest of Sarajevo.
WORLD
November 30, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Many paths led to the international agreement to temporarily curb Iran's nuclear program: secret meetings in Oman, formal negotiations in Geneva, and a quiet encounter in New York involving two diplomats and an exquisite silver chalice in the shape of a mythical winged creature. The latter session led in September to the return of the chalice to Iran, where officials hailed it as a gesture of friendship by the United States. The move was orchestrated by a mid-level diplomat at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations who devised a way to work around a 30-year absence in formal relations.
NEWS
November 12, 2013 | By Trishna Patel
Zack Edison snapped this intimate moment while hanging out in a section of a friend's house -- appropriately coined the “man cave” -- on a rainy Saturday night. The photographer used a Canon 60D along with his “trusty” 8mm lens. Follow Trishna Patel on  Twitter . Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our  Flickr page  or  reader submission gallery .  Follow us on Twitter  or visit  latimes.com/socalmoments  for more on this photo series.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|