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SPORTS
May 2, 2012 | By Eric Sondheimer
Angels manager Mike Scioscia said he is "kind of going caveman" with the starting lineup Wednesday against the Twins at Angel Stadium. He has moved Vernon Wells to No. 2 in the order, with Erick Aybar leading off. Then come the big bats -- Albert Pujols, Kendrys Morales and Torii Hunter. Howard Kendrick is batting sixth, followed by Mark Trumbo, Chris Iannetta and Peter Bourjos. It's an experiment of sorts, particularly Wells batting second. The Angels have won the first two games of a three-game home series against the Twins and will have ace Jered Weaver on the mound.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 17, 2012
Re "Women greener than men?," Opinion, June 13 Women historically have been the nurturers, the caregivers. Of course they would have greater sensitivity to the environment's effect on humans. Will the caveman macho mentality of most men (and many women) finally mature into responsible stewardship of the Earth? My guess is not until the damage humans have done smacks us more directly in the face. That's a sorry legacy to leave to our next generations. Roy Poucher Santa Ana ALSO: Letters: The bishops' contraception battle Letters: Public and private unions -- they're different Letters: Political money that could be put to better use
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010 | By Irene Lacher
With his role in "The Female of the Species" at the Geffen Playhouse -- only his second onstage after a whirl in "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" -- David Arquette turns a new page in his career. And not a second too soon, at least as far as the youngest sibling of the famous Arquette acting family is concerned. In Joanna Murray-Smith's farce, Arquette plays the slow-witted, apron-wearing husband of a woman who really wants a bad-boy caveman. The play, which runs through March 14, also stars Annette Bening as a famous narcissistic feminist author.
SPORTS
May 2, 2012 | By Eric Sondheimer
Angels manager Mike Scioscia said he is "kind of going caveman" with the starting lineup Wednesday against the Twins at Angel Stadium. He has moved Vernon Wells to No. 2 in the order, with Erick Aybar leading off. Then come the big bats -- Albert Pujols, Kendrys Morales and Torii Hunter. Howard Kendrick is batting sixth, followed by Mark Trumbo, Chris Iannetta and Peter Bourjos. It's an experiment of sorts, particularly Wells batting second. The Angels have won the first two games of a three-game home series against the Twins and will have ace Jered Weaver on the mound.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1998
Information, schmimformation! Thanks to Microsoft and others, we are sated with information, toys, games and gadgets. Information provides knowledge, which may produce some intelligence, which might, after much experience and pondering, furnish a bit of wisdom. Look at the state of our society in our happy glut. We are today no wiser than was the caveman. BILL BEAVER Lancaster
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1991
The anonymous describer of another facet of anonymity: Loss of status, etc., is a clear example of what an obsolete system does to people. Capitalism is but a word if it does not function creatively! It is not a religion! It must provide for all or for none; not for a smug few; that should have gone with the caveman! JOSEPH P. KRENGEL Santa Monica
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1987
Heaven help us if Americans now place most of their confidence in the military, rather than religious or other social organizations. We have regressed to the caveman stage. Civilization is in a precarious state. In our paranoia we forget that our so-called enemies are quite capable of matching us militarily. Why are we so arrogant and so destructive? ALICE S. WORTHINGTON Whittier
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1985
Grownups have been saying "I would hate to be the parent of a teen-age girl growing up right now" since caveman days. But little girls have always been raunchy; always had kinky fantasies. What do you suppose made Rudolph Valentino an international superstar, whose photos were clutched to millions of training-bra-clad, palpitating hearts? His controversial concept of dramaturgy? Noooooo. It was just plain, ole, raunchy, kinky sex appeal. JOHN DEGATINA Los Angeles
NEWS
July 28, 1991
"Return of the Brute" (July 19) was the most callous, insensitive look at male-female relationships I've read in a long time. If the only thing in life that matters is what I want, what I can get and how I can con the other person, we're all in bigger trouble than we think. What's being won, anyway? Improving the art of deception, manipulation and caveman tactics? What's being lost? Probably the chance to have a good friend as well as a lover and an affair that could last a lifetime.
OPINION
September 30, 2004
Your Sept. 26 editorial, "A Hijacked People's Right," criticizes Proposition 63, which would fund efforts to assist mental health by taxing those who earn more than $1 million a year. California clearly has problems raising revenue. It is difficult for the Legislature to raise funds because of the ridiculous two-thirds vote requirement that necessitates votes of stubborn "caveman" Republicans. The usual funding method on the ballot is the bond measure, but taxpayers end up paying back the bond twice since they fork over interest payments to bankers for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010 | By Irene Lacher
With his role in "The Female of the Species" at the Geffen Playhouse -- only his second onstage after a whirl in "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" -- David Arquette turns a new page in his career. And not a second too soon, at least as far as the youngest sibling of the famous Arquette acting family is concerned. In Joanna Murray-Smith's farce, Arquette plays the slow-witted, apron-wearing husband of a woman who really wants a bad-boy caveman. The play, which runs through March 14, also stars Annette Bening as a famous narcissistic feminist author.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2009 | David Pagel
Fifteen years ago, Monique Prieto burst onto the scene with a series of squeaky-clean canvases that changed the way people thought about abstract painting in Los Angeles. Five years ago, she turned her back on the crisply composed monochrome blobs that had become her signature, ditched acrylics for oils and began painting pictures of phrases borrowed from the nine-volume diary of 17th century Englishman Samuel Pepys, in a style best described as caveman-graffiti. That stunning shift from hard-edge abstraction to messy image-and-text Conceptualism pales in comparison to the changes that have taken place between Prieto's earliest word paintings and her new ones at ACME Gallery.
OPINION
November 19, 2006
DID ANATOMICALLY modern humans interbreed with Neanderthals, the muscle-bound, big-browed and possibly mute cave dwellers who disappeared from Europe and the Middle East about 30,000 years ago? The answer may be less interesting than the fact that so many Homo sapiens are fixated on the question.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
THE term "caveman art" might bring to mind crudely rendered hunting scenes etched onto stone, but Joel Tauber is a different kind of a caveman, and his art is just as unusual. The 33-year-old fine-arts graduate of Yale and Pasadena's Art Center College of Design rents out living space that's been carved from the side of a hill in Eagle Rock, and seldom have human and habitat been so aptly joined.
OPINION
September 30, 2004
Your Sept. 26 editorial, "A Hijacked People's Right," criticizes Proposition 63, which would fund efforts to assist mental health by taxing those who earn more than $1 million a year. California clearly has problems raising revenue. It is difficult for the Legislature to raise funds because of the ridiculous two-thirds vote requirement that necessitates votes of stubborn "caveman" Republicans. The usual funding method on the ballot is the bond measure, but taxpayers end up paying back the bond twice since they fork over interest payments to bankers for decades.
NEWS
June 26, 2003 | Samantha Bonar, Times Staff Writer
A group called Euro RSCG Worldwide has done a study of American men aged 21 to 48, purporting to deconstruct the 21st century man. If you are like me, you will find the results alarming. According to the new study, "When asked to choose from a list of approximately three dozen words," only 20% of men described themselves as "sexy." "The word today's men are most apt to assign themselves is 'caring,' selected by 74% of correspondents," the study said. I don't want a caring man.
OPINION
June 17, 2012
Re "Women greener than men?," Opinion, June 13 Women historically have been the nurturers, the caregivers. Of course they would have greater sensitivity to the environment's effect on humans. Will the caveman macho mentality of most men (and many women) finally mature into responsible stewardship of the Earth? My guess is not until the damage humans have done smacks us more directly in the face. That's a sorry legacy to leave to our next generations. Roy Poucher Santa Ana ALSO: Letters: The bishops' contraception battle Letters: Public and private unions -- they're different Letters: Political money that could be put to better use
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1993
I was appalled to learn ("Teacher Tagging at CSUN Seminar," July 24) that "tagging" is being taught at CSUN as a visual arts project. Tagging costs me a minimum of $1,200 per year for a graffiti removal service. Teacher Barbara Kerwin says: "The role of graffiti is historically significant. . . . Man marks his territory. . . . Caveman marked his walls too." My territory is my territory, and I don't appreciate--as a taxpayer--this art form being taught at a state university using my tax dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | EMANUEL LEVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it comes to the depiction of homelessness, Hollywood has taken a benign, almost mythical view of one of America's most disturbing problems. Glossing over the issue, the few movies that broach the subject have presented a stereotypically sanitized portrait, turning the homeless into noble saints or misunderstood geniuses. The latest example is Kasi Lemmons' "The Caveman's Valentine," in which Samuel L.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Men don't like to talk as much as women do, says Rob Becker. But he spends more than 90 minutes talking about it. That's not the only thing that Becker says in his "Defending the Caveman" comedy routine at the Pantages Theatre. One of his other observations of human behavior is that men aren't good at observing human behavior. Men like to focus on one goal at a time, he claims. Men negotiate with each other, while women cooperate. Men are like this, women are like that, ad nauseam.
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