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BUSINESS
February 22, 1999 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Limited sales and bruising competition forced Purple Moon, a pioneer of the girls' games genre, to close its doors last week and lay off all its employees. The Mountain View, Calif.-based creator of CD-ROM titles for 8-to-12-year-olds said in a statement that increased consolidation in the video game industry was a primary reason for its decision. Ironically, this consolidation is being driven largely by a broadening of the video game market to include categories such as girls' games.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 1999
Amateur photographers will soon be able to get their pictures stored on CD-ROM as easily as developing a roll of film into prints, as Eastman Kodak Co. rolls out its Picture CD product nationwide. But it will cost about $9 more a roll for the novelty of having a photofinishing store computerize their traditional snapshots. Kodak, which developed the Picture CD along with Intel Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Beach High School appears to be the first in Orange County to go with a high-tech version of alumni memories, offering students a yearbook on CD-ROM this year. In a few years, when today's Laguna Beach seniors go for a stroll down memory lane, they will have the option of turning the pages of a traditional paper yearbook or clicking on an icon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE
A Castaic man was charged Friday with four counts of allegedly selling obscene CD-ROMs depicting bestiality and scatology to undercover Los Angeles police officers at a computer show at the Sherman Oaks Entertainment Center in September. Marshall Jay Lefcourt, 45, allegedly sold CD-ROMs to investigators who viewed them on a computer in a police vehicle parked outside the venue, according to Los Angeles City prosecutor Lynn Magnandonovan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yearbooks, you remember them--those musty, leather-bound tomes memorializing school days in staged black-and-white group shots and senior quotes. Increasingly, these quaint paper artifacts aren't enough for some teens weaned on computer games and the World Wide Web. Many want something a little more high-tech from their high school memorabilia. Enter the CD-ROM, the latest trend in nontraditional yearbooks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1998 | REGINA HONG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leave the Beanie Babies and Teletubbies on the store shelves. Forget about the latest Nintendo and Sega games. At least, that's what your child's teacher would probably like to say. If many educators had their wish, parents would ignore the latest toy craze this holiday season in favor of some fun but more educational gifts that stimulate their children's creativity and encourage exploration.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1998 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buy it. Buy it now. In fact, buy six--someday they might be worth something. That's the unstated pitch some record companies are using to sell readily-available albums by presenting them as collectibles or fleeting "limited editions." And they're dangling some big names--the Beatles, Frank Sinatra, Queen and, most prominently, the season's seemingly ubiquitous Garth Brooks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huckle Cat, Lowly Worm, Mr. Fix-It, Bugdozer--when "Busytown" children's artist and writer Richard Scarry died in 1994, he left behind a world of creations beloved by young children for decades. That intricately detailed world of gentle learning and comic, anthropomorphic animal folk, however, lives on in books, videos, on television and most recently in CD-ROMs. It keeps growing, thanks to another professional artist.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
There may not be many ways to jazz up a corporation's annual report, but an Encino start-up thinks it has found one method: Put it on a CD-ROM. Reading columns of numbers on a computer screen isn't necessarily an improvement over reading columns of numbers on paper. So Digital Corporate Profiles augments the annual report with video clips, graphics and music to tell a company's story.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Synthonics Technologies in Westlake Village has delivered an interactive CD-ROM containing dozens of 3-D objects to the Smithsonian Institution. Called "The Smithsonian Museum Collection," the software enables museums to make priceless objects in their collections accessible to the public via computer programs or 3-D images distributed over the Internet. Synthonics licenses its Rapid Virtual Reality technology for distance learning and electronic commerce applications.
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