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Cecil B Demille

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey FILM CRITIC >>>
It was already feeling like a Cecil B. DeMille kind of night, long before Martin Scorsese stepped on the stage with an eloquent tribute to the legendary director's golden touch as he picked up the DeMille award for his own lifetime of achievement during Sunday's Golden Globes. If anything, the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn., all 83 of them, seemed to be channeling the moviemaker who preached and practiced a fundamentalist version of the entertainment bible through four decades and 85 movies, parting the Red Sea in his final spectacle, 1956's "The Ten Commandments."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
How do you give a lifetime achievement award to a director still very much in motion, to an artist who refuses to settle down, to someone who actively does not want one? Woody Allen is in the midst of a run of box-office successes and critical acclaim. His current film, "Blue Jasmine," has firmly implanted itself into this year's awards-season conversation. Having turned 78 years old last month, Allen seems as busy as ever. Which is only part of the reason Allen will not be accepting his Cecil B. DeMille Award in person at the Golden Globes this weekend.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
You don't have to be much of a film buff to know you're in for a particular treat when you open Scott Eyman's remarkable new biography of the American cinema's iconic director and find a prologue that opens: "On the morning of May 23, 1949, at the Paramount studio on Marathon Street in the heart of Hollywood, Cecil B. DeMille was busily engaged in polishing Billy Wilder's dialogue. " Eyman, books editor of the Palm Beach Post, is the author of numerous books on film, including widely admired biographies of John Ford and Louis B. Mayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I will take Jodie Foster's 6 minutes and 40 seconds of unfiltered passion, confusion, confession and love, so much love, over anything else anyone in Hollywood has said in a very, very long time. The occasion was Sunday night's Golden Globes, and as the actress-director gripped the Cecil B. DeMille statuette she'd just been handed for a lifetime of work, she let go of a lifetime of feelings. After years of putting up walls, Foster was real and raw - chanting "I'm 50! I'm 50!" as if that were the shocker.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2010 | By Jay Jones
Beneath untold tons of sands, the ancient Egyptian city is no longer intact. But what remains is in good condition. Shielded from the elements by burial, the once-towering monuments to the pharaohs continue to reveal themselves bit by bit. In recent years, archaeologists -- from professionals to absolute amateurs -- have unearthed various relics. Some of the artifacts are now in a museum. Others are in private collections, such as the sphinx paw on display in John Perry's auto parts store in Guadalupe, along with the fan belts, headlights and bottles of brake fluid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2010 | By Mike Anton
Strong winds scour the dunes, which hide a curious history. Nails and fragments of concrete are scattered everywhere. Steel cables, carved pieces of wood and slabs of painted plaster poke out of the ground, ghosts rising from the grave. In 1923, Cecil B. DeMille came to the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes on California's Central Coast and built a movie set that still captures the imagination -- a colossal Egyptian dreamscape for the silent movie version of "The Ten Commandments." Under the direction of French artist Paul Iribe, a founder of the Art Deco movement, 1,600 craftsmen built a temple 800 feet wide and 120 feet tall flanked by four 40-ton statues of the Pharaoh Ramses II. Twenty-one giant plaster sphinxes lined a path to the temple's gates.
REAL ESTATE
September 7, 2003
Regarding Home of the Week, Aug. 24: I'd like to point out that the former W.C. Fields house in Los Feliz has not only "Seen Some Lively Times" but some deadly times too. In March 1941, Cecil B. DeMille's grandson, Christopher Quinn, 2 1/2 years old, the son of actors Anthony and Katherine DeMille Quinn, slipped out of his grandparents' home and apparently toddled across DeMille Drive to the house of neighbor Fields, where he was later found drowned...
NEWS
December 15, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Actor Charlton Heston joined government officials in the opening of a new museum--a nearly century-old barn used by Cecil B. DeMille to make Hollywood's first feature-length film. The "DeMille Barn" was built on Vine Street in 1888 to store supplies and wagons for the tiny farm community that later became Hollywood. The barn was rented by DeMille in 1913 to film "The Squaw Man." It has been moved to Highland Avenue across from the Hollywood Bowl and will be open Saturdays and Sundays.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991
Well, if no one else has the guts to admit it, I loved Irwin Allen. I grew up watching "The Time Tunnel," "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" and that great-spirited show, "Lost in Space." I was truly saddened to hear of his departing. Allen's early 1970s disaster epics, "The Poseidon Adventure" and "The Towering Inferno" brought back the spectacle and craftsmanship not seen in Hollywood for numerous years. Irwin Allen, like Cecil B. DeMille before him, was not known for subtlety but was pure showman and I, for one, loved it when he put on a show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010
If you are looking for a cinematic way to celebrate Easter Sunday, why not catch a big-screen presentation of 1927's silent "The King of Kings"? H.B. Warner plays the title role, but the real star is director Cecil B. DeMille, the king of biblical epics. Picked as the best film about Jesus in a Time magazine poll, "The King of Kings" is notable for its early Technicolor resurrection scene. As the ads said, "Supreme in Theme, Gigantic in Execution." Live musical accompaniment by the Cabeza de Vaca Arcestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
The bang is not so big in Marco Brambilla's "Creation (Megaplex)," the final part of a video collage trilogy at Christopher Grimes. Our world emerges with relative modesty, as pulses of light and galactic crackling, set to the portentous opening chords of Prokofiev's Cinderella Waltz. Things heat up quickly, however. Within four minutes, the earth has been populated, copulated upon, poisoned by progress, pageantry and pride, and set aflame, yielding assorted bits of cosmic debris -- the Statue of Liberty's disembodied head, an untethered astronaut, the Bob's Big Boy icon wearing rocket-powered shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Susan King
Actress and director Jodie Foster will receive the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.'s 2013 Cecil B. DeMille Award, the group announced Thursday morning. "Jodie is a multi-talented woman that has achieved immeasurable amounts of success and will continue to do so in her career," HFPA President Aida Takla-O'Reilly said in a statement. The award, named after the legendary producer-director of such classic films as "The Greatest Show on Earth" and "The Ten Commandments," is given annually to "talented individuals who have made an incredible impact on the world of entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Officials at USC's School of Cinematic Arts have warmly embraced the digital era in filmmaking, but they also realize that silent movies are golden. On Monday evening, the school held a dedication for the Cecil B. DeMille Endowed Chair in Silent Film. Cecilia DeMille Presley, granddaughter of the man who made 1952's Oscar-winner "The Greatest Show on Earth" and 1956's "The Ten Commandments," was on hand to talk to USC cinema students about DeMille and to screen his erotic 1915 melodrama "The Cheat.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
You don't have to be much of a film buff to know you're in for a particular treat when you open Scott Eyman's remarkable new biography of the American cinema's iconic director and find a prologue that opens: "On the morning of May 23, 1949, at the Paramount studio on Marathon Street in the heart of Hollywood, Cecil B. DeMille was busily engaged in polishing Billy Wilder's dialogue. " Eyman, books editor of the Palm Beach Post, is the author of numerous books on film, including widely admired biographies of John Ford and Louis B. Mayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010
If you are looking for a cinematic way to celebrate Easter Sunday, why not catch a big-screen presentation of 1927's silent "The King of Kings"? H.B. Warner plays the title role, but the real star is director Cecil B. DeMille, the king of biblical epics. Picked as the best film about Jesus in a Time magazine poll, "The King of Kings" is notable for its early Technicolor resurrection scene. As the ads said, "Supreme in Theme, Gigantic in Execution." Live musical accompaniment by the Cabeza de Vaca Arcestra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2010 | By Mike Anton
Strong winds scour the dunes, which hide a curious history. Nails and fragments of concrete are scattered everywhere. Steel cables, carved pieces of wood and slabs of painted plaster poke out of the ground, ghosts rising from the grave. In 1923, Cecil B. DeMille came to the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes on California's Central Coast and built a movie set that still captures the imagination -- a colossal Egyptian dreamscape for the silent movie version of "The Ten Commandments." Under the direction of French artist Paul Iribe, a founder of the Art Deco movement, 1,600 craftsmen built a temple 800 feet wide and 120 feet tall flanked by four 40-ton statues of the Pharaoh Ramses II. Twenty-one giant plaster sphinxes lined a path to the temple's gates.
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1985 | CYNTHIA KADONAGA
It is a monument to movies and to pioneer movie maker Cecil B. DeMille. The office remains as it was when he died in 1959. There's a projection booth for private screenings; a personal telephone book with unlisted numbers for Samuel Goldwyn and Charlton Heston; a Golden Corncob Award from popcorn manufacturers, who prospered due to his films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2006
Dec. 29, 1922: Film director Cecil B. DeMille had high hopes for his new racing boat, the Miss Cecilia. But when he took the boat out in Los Angeles Harbor for its maiden trip to compete in the Garfield "Gar" Wood championship motorboat races, it "burned at the starting line," The Times reported. The accident began with "a backfire which exploded the tanks under the seat," the newspaper said. "DeMille and his mechanician, Al Fear, literally were blasted out of the boat.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2010 | By Jay Jones
Beneath untold tons of sands, the ancient Egyptian city is no longer intact. But what remains is in good condition. Shielded from the elements by burial, the once-towering monuments to the pharaohs continue to reveal themselves bit by bit. In recent years, archaeologists -- from professionals to absolute amateurs -- have unearthed various relics. Some of the artifacts are now in a museum. Others are in private collections, such as the sphinx paw on display in John Perry's auto parts store in Guadalupe, along with the fan belts, headlights and bottles of brake fluid.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey FILM CRITIC >>>
It was already feeling like a Cecil B. DeMille kind of night, long before Martin Scorsese stepped on the stage with an eloquent tribute to the legendary director's golden touch as he picked up the DeMille award for his own lifetime of achievement during Sunday's Golden Globes. If anything, the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn., all 83 of them, seemed to be channeling the moviemaker who preached and practiced a fundamentalist version of the entertainment bible through four decades and 85 movies, parting the Red Sea in his final spectacle, 1956's "The Ten Commandments."
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