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Cecil Murray

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MAGAZINE
August 16, 1992 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is the magazine's staff writer. Her last story explored the impact of absent fathers on the American family.
TALK ABOUT GALL: THE REV. CECIL MURRAY IS CONSUMED WITH the revitalization of South-Central Los Angeles, now a checkerboard of charred ruins, and this prim young woman in pink linen sits on his couch wanting help in launching her toddler's show-biz career.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2013 | Angel Jennings
In his final days as pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church, the Rev. Cecil L. "Chip" Murray compiled, copied and buried piles of records amassed over the 27 years he led the congregation. The time capsule, he believed, would preserve his legacy and document the church's role as a force for positive change in South L.A. But in the nine years since he retired, Murray has watched his hard work crumble under the leadership of his successor, the Rev. John J. Hunter, and his wife.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2004 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
The church is so crowded that ushers are setting up folding chairs next to the packed pews. From the pulpit of the First African Methodist Episcopal church, trustee Irma Brown Dillon instructs, "Raise your right hand if Pastor Cecil Murray married you." Hands fly up. "Raise your left hand if he baptized you," she continues. More hands go up. Some wave both hands. "Stand up if he said a funeral for your relative or someone you know," she says. Nearly everyone stands.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2004 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
The church is so crowded that ushers are setting up folding chairs next to the packed pews. From the pulpit of the First African Methodist Episcopal church, trustee Irma Brown Dillon instructs, "Raise your right hand if Pastor Cecil Murray married you." Hands fly up. "Raise your left hand if he baptized you," she continues. More hands go up. Some wave both hands. "Stand up if he said a funeral for your relative or someone you know," she says. Nearly everyone stands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Rev. Cecil "Chip" Murray of First AME Church was released Wednesday from a hospital where he had undergone treatment for prostate cancer. Murray, prominent in Los Angeles religious circles, checked in to Kaiser Permanente in West Los Angeles last week, where he was treated and kept under observation. Doctors for the senior pastor at First AME said he could return to work in October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1991 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a power outage temporarily doused the lights Sunday morning at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church in South-Central Los Angeles, the Rev. Cecil Murray didn't hesitate to incorporate the blackout into his sermon on AIDS. Murray said "blackouts" occur every time the deadly disease takes another life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1994 | JOHN DART
When he was asked to speak on "rebuilding Los Angeles" at the monthly Clergy Network lunch in the San Fernando Valley, the pastor and community leader from South-Central Los Angeles demurred Wednesday and said that he preferred to talk about "building" instead. "Rebuilding is like remarrying," said the Rev. Cecil (Chip) Murray of First African Methodist Church of Los Angeles. "If the same people come back together, they are going to have the same problems they had before."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Cecil L. Murray took out a white handkerchief, wiped the sweat off his brow and thundered at his congregation in a deep baritone befitting of the pastor of Los Angeles' oldest and perhaps most politically active black church. "Be cool," Murray implored. "Even in anger be cool. And if you're gonna burn something down, don't burn down the house of the victims, brother! Burn down the Legislature! Burn down the courtroom! "Burn it down by voting, brother!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Thomas could hardly believe it when a pack of rival gangsters marched uninvited into his South Los Angeles housing project one afternoon a few months ago. Thomas never ventured outdoors in daylight because it was too dangerous for a self-described general in his neighborhood's violent street wars. But this sight was too bizarre for him to ignore. "They didn't come with no guns, they didn't come with no knives," Thomas, 28, recalled incredulously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2004 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
The circular stretch of a South Los Angeles road that runs by First AME Church was named for minister Cecil L. "Chip" Murray on Sunday morning, in appreciation for a man who is retiring this month after reinvigorating the city's oldest black congregation and helping Los Angeles heal after the tumult of the 1992 riots. Murray, 74, alluded to those two accomplishments at a ceremony in front of the new street sign bearing his name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
He has been head pastor at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church for 27 years, helping transform his Mid-City church into a center for social activism. Recognizing that service, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to name a portion of West 25th Street near the church Dr. Cecil L. "Chip" Murray Circle, after the 74-year-old pastor who is set to retire this fall. "The congregants will be pleasantly surprised," said the Rev. Leonard Jackson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Rev. Cecil "Chip" Murray of First AME Church was released Wednesday from a hospital where he had undergone treatment for prostate cancer. Murray, prominent in Los Angeles religious circles, checked in to Kaiser Permanente in West Los Angeles last week, where he was treated and kept under observation. Doctors for the senior pastor at First AME said he could return to work in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some interviews came easier than others when Hugh Hewitt was compiling "Searching for God in America," a PBS series of eight conversations with religious leaders who represent the nation's divergent and expanding universe of traditional faiths. Among Hewitt's catches were the Dalai Lama and the Rev. Cecil Murray. The big miss was the Rev. Billy Graham, who couldn't do the interview because he was recovering from a severe fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1994 | JOHN DART
When he was asked to speak on "rebuilding Los Angeles" at the monthly Clergy Network lunch in the San Fernando Valley, the pastor and community leader from South-Central Los Angeles demurred Wednesday and said that he preferred to talk about "building" instead. "Rebuilding is like remarrying," said the Rev. Cecil (Chip) Murray of First African Methodist Church of Los Angeles. "If the same people come back together, they are going to have the same problems they had before."
NEWS
December 31, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renee Firestone, a survivor of the Holocaust that claimed the lives of her mother and father, looked out into a circle of 13 white faces Thursday evening and shuddered. "Why are you so angry?" she asked the young members of the Fourth Reich Skinheads. "I have a reason to be angry. . . . What is your reason?" The skinheads listed one grievance after another: minorities who they said had beaten and robbed them, and reporters who they felt had misrepresented them.
NEWS
December 31, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renee Firestone, a survivor of the Holocaust that claimed the lives of her mother and father, looked out into a circle of 13 white faces Thursday evening and shuddered. "Why are you so angry?" she asked the young members of the Fourth Reich Skinheads. "I have a reason to be angry. . . . What is your reason?" The skinheads listed one grievance after another: minorities who they said had beaten and robbed them, and reporters who they felt had misrepresented them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
He has been head pastor at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church for 27 years, helping transform his Mid-City church into a center for social activism. Recognizing that service, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to name a portion of West 25th Street near the church Dr. Cecil L. "Chip" Murray Circle, after the 74-year-old pastor who is set to retire this fall. "The congregants will be pleasantly surprised," said the Rev. Leonard Jackson.
MAGAZINE
August 16, 1992 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is the magazine's staff writer. Her last story explored the impact of absent fathers on the American family.
TALK ABOUT GALL: THE REV. CECIL MURRAY IS CONSUMED WITH the revitalization of South-Central Los Angeles, now a checkerboard of charred ruins, and this prim young woman in pink linen sits on his couch wanting help in launching her toddler's show-biz career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Thomas could hardly believe it when a pack of rival gangsters marched uninvited into his South Los Angeles housing project one afternoon a few months ago. Thomas never ventured outdoors in daylight because it was too dangerous for a self-described general in his neighborhood's violent street wars. But this sight was too bizarre for him to ignore. "They didn't come with no guns, they didn't come with no knives," Thomas, 28, recalled incredulously.
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