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Cedars Sinai

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1995
Ground was broken Tuesday on a $10-million expansion project that will nearly double the size of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's emergency room and enable the hospital to accept more trauma patients. Spokeswoman Paula Correia said the current emergency room was designed to handle 50 to 80 patients a day when it opened in 1976. She said it now must accept 150 to 200 a day. "When we're at over-capacity, we have to close the emergency room," she said.
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NEWS
June 27, 1993 | LEE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is expected to start construction within three years on a major expansion project that calls for adding four new buildings over a 15-year period to the 22-acre medical facility, said Irving Feintech, chairman-elect of the board of directors. Feintech said the expansion is vital to the medical center's future, in large part because it will allow additional outpatient care. Such treatment, Feintech said, "is one of the most important trends in patient care today."
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is about to embark on a major expansion, adding a 1,900-space parking structure and four buildings to its already crowded grounds in an effort to come to terms with changing demands for medical service.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | BEA MAXWELL
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center celebrated its "Campaign for the 21st Century" at a gala Monday at the Regent Beverly Wilshire and announced that more than $40 million has been raised toward the five-year goal of $140 million. Funds will support patient care, research, medical education and community service. Anne and Kirk Douglas are honorary co-chairmen of the campaign. Pacific Center for HIV/AIDS Counseling and Psychotherapy netted $75,000 at a black-tie gala Sept. 19 at the Bonaventure.
NEWS
April 24, 1997 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Ms. Liz suffered seizures following her brain surgery, he reassured us that such complications are common and that "she is continuing to recover very nicely." When rumors swirled about Michael Jackson's impending parenthood, he finally confirmed that Jackson's wife, Debbie Rowe, had left the hospital with a healthy newborn son.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
"If my mother were alive," said Carina Courtright Quasha, "this is the way I imagine she would have done it." It was, perhaps, the nicest compliment given all evening. The occasion was a black-tie gala at the Beverly Wilshire--make that the Regent Beverly Wilshire, since Regent International Hotels bought it--to thank the six-figure donors who contributed to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's successful $90-million endowment fund campaign.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The mix of microbes living in the human gut -- in particular, the presence of a particular bacterium that gobbles hydrogen and produces methane -- may be related to obesity, researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles said Tuesday. In a study led by Dr. Ruchi Mathur, head of the Diabetes Outpatient Treatment and Education Center in the hospital's endocrinology division, researchers at Cedars-Sinai recruited 792 people of varying ages, body mass index levels and body fat content and asked them to breathe into a device that analyzed the contents of their breath.
NEWS
September 10, 1985 | From Associated Press
Dozens of animal rights advocates chained themselves to portions of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center today to protest the plight of animals being used in research. Peggy Shaff, spokeswoman for the medical center, confirmed that there was a demonstration that started about noon and said medical center operations were not disrupted. "There is a demonstration going on, and there are people on the roof and chained to a truck," she said. "It is very organized, very staged."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2009 | Alan Zarembo
More than 200 patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were inappropriately exposed to high doses of radiation from CT brain scans used to diagnose strokes, hospital officials told The Times on Friday. About 40% of the patients lost patches of hair as a result of the overdoses, a hospital spokesman said. Even so, the overdoses went undetected for 18 months as patients received eight times the dose normally delivered in the procedure, raising questions about why it took Cedars-Sinai so long to notice that something was wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center will close its in-patient and outpatient psychiatry programs over the next year, a move prompted by significant shifts in the healthcare system, hospital officials said. The decision, which was announced Wednesday, was driven by hospital finances and changes to the delivery and organization ofhealthcare services nationwide. "We are undergoing a massive transformation," said Mark Gavens, the chief operating officer. "It is natural for an organization to focus on what it does well and what it will continue to need to do well to serve the community.
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