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Celeste Holm

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012 | By David Ng
Celeste Holm, who died Sunday at 95, had a lengthy career on stage and screen. But one of the actress' foremost passions was situated far from the entertainment industry. Holm was an arts advocate for many years and served as a chairwoman for Arts Horizons, a nonprofit group that provides arts education programs in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. At the time of her death, Holm was the chairwoman emeritus of the group. The actress also served for six years on the National Council for the Arts, having been appointed in 1982 by President Reagan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012 | By David Ng
Celeste Holm, who died Sunday at 95, had a lengthy career on stage and screen. But one of the actress' foremost passions was situated far from the entertainment industry. Holm was an arts advocate for many years and served as a chairwoman for Arts Horizons, a nonprofit group that provides arts education programs in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. At the time of her death, Holm was the chairwoman emeritus of the group. The actress also served for six years on the National Council for the Arts, having been appointed in 1982 by President Reagan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Susan King
Celeste Holm, who died Sunday in Manhattan at the age of 95, created the role of the sassy Ado Annie - "I Cain't Say No" - in the original 1943 Broadway production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's seminal musical "Oklahoma!" Holm also won the supporting actress Oscar for 1947's "Gentleman's Agreement" for her role as the lonely and sympathetic secretary. In person, she was someone who wasn't afraid to speak her mind.   PHOTOS: Celeste Holm | 1917-2012 Warm and gracious, she had been in the business for 60 years when I interviewed her in 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
Celeste Holm, the versatile actress who achieved fame on Broadway in the original production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's hit musical "Oklahoma!" in 1943 and five years later won an Oscar for best supporting actress in the landmark movie-drama "Gentleman's Agreement," died Sunday. She was 95. Holm, whose more than 70-year career in show business included performing in nightclubs, died in her apartment on Central Park West in New York City, said her husband, Frank Basile. She had recently spent two weeks in a hospital, where she was discovered to be dehydrated and ended up suffering a heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Celeste Holm is not afraid to speak her mind about anything or anybody. Just ask her for her opinion on Hollywood today. "I think we seem to be in the middle of suicide on the part of the motion picture industry," says the 79-year-old actress. "I don't think the motion picture people realize the influence they have on people, and they are making such nonsense! Look at the average stuff which is being made. I don't go to the movies unless someone says, 'You have got to see that.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
Celeste Holm, the versatile actress who achieved fame on Broadway in the original production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's hit musical "Oklahoma!" in 1943 and five years later won an Oscar for best supporting actress in the landmark movie-drama "Gentleman's Agreement," died Sunday. She was 95. Holm, whose more than 70-year career in show business included performing in nightclubs, died in her apartment on Central Park West in New York City, said her husband, Frank Basile. She had recently spent two weeks in a hospital, where she was discovered to be dehydrated and ended up suffering a heart attack.
NEWS
April 29, 2008
'All About Eve': The caption on a photo that accompanied an article in Monday's Calendar section about a Bette Davis film showcase identified the man with Davis and Celeste Holm in "All About Eve" as Gary Merrill. It was Hugh Marlowe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Hall of Famers: New York's Theater Hall of Fame will add eight new members to its ranks today. Producers James M. Nederlander and Ellen Stewart, actors Barnard Hughes, Celeste Holm and Zoe Caldwell and composer Burton Lane will be inducted during a ceremony hosted by Tony-winner Dorothy Loudon at Broadway's Gershwin Theater; choreographer Jack Cole and playwright Paul Green will be honored posthumously.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1995 | Susan King
"Forrest Gump" may have scored 13 Oscar nominations this year, but no film has ever matched the 14 nominations set by 1950's "All About Eve." The sophisticated comedy was written and directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and starred Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, Gary Merrill, Celeste Holm and George Sanders. Though "Eve" had stiff competition from "Born Yesterday," "Sunset Boulevard," "Father of the Bride" and "King Solomon's Mines," it won six Oscars, including best picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Susan King
Celeste Holm, who died Sunday in Manhattan at the age of 95, created the role of the sassy Ado Annie - "I Cain't Say No" - in the original 1943 Broadway production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's seminal musical "Oklahoma!" Holm also won the supporting actress Oscar for 1947's "Gentleman's Agreement" for her role as the lonely and sympathetic secretary. In person, she was someone who wasn't afraid to speak her mind.   PHOTOS: Celeste Holm | 1917-2012 Warm and gracious, she had been in the business for 60 years when I interviewed her in 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Celeste Holm is not afraid to speak her mind about anything or anybody. Just ask her for her opinion on Hollywood today. "I think we seem to be in the middle of suicide on the part of the motion picture industry," says the 79-year-old actress. "I don't think the motion picture people realize the influence they have on people, and they are making such nonsense! Look at the average stuff which is being made. I don't go to the movies unless someone says, 'You have got to see that.'
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Sigourney Weaver is now charging fans $1 for her autograph, but the money goes to a good cause. She's donating it to AIDS research. "So far I've gotten several hundred dollars," Weaver told People magazine. "Nobody refuses. Some say, 'Here's $20.' " Weaver got the idea from actress Celeste Holm, who reportedly has raised nearly $20,000 for UNICEF in 20 years by charging 50 cents for her signature. "It changes the whole experience of giving out autographs," Weaver says.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1997
The Music Center's Club 100 will honor comedian Steve Allen, actor Gregory Peck and five others at the group's 16th annual Distinguished Artists Awards on Nov. 3 at 6 p.m. at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel. Additional honorees are actress Celeste Holm, actor Gregory Hines, outgoing L.A. Philharmonic Executive Director Ernest Fleischmann and composer-lyricists Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller.
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