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Cell Transplants

HEALTH
March 14, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Hundreds of diabetics can now live without daily injections after receiving transplants of insulin-producing cells. These cells, taken from the pancreases of several cadavers, quickly set to work inside their new hosts to produce the glucose-regulating hormone. But most diabetics aren't candidates for the transplants. There simply aren't enough organs available to provide the cells.
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HEALTH
April 22, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new type of cell transplant to treat Parkinson's disease appears to significantly improve patients' movements while avoiding the ethical quandaries linked to fetal and stem cell use. The technique, which so far has been tested only in six patients, uses eye cells obtained from a cadaver donor.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Major advances in healing damaged spines, the most important cause of paralysis, were reported Wednesday by two independent research groups. One group used fetal cell transplants to restore near-normal function in the rear legs of cats that had suffered paralyzing spinal damage, apparently the first report of such success in any mammal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two types of experimental surgical procedures have significantly improved the conditions of patients with Parkinson's disease, surgeons said here Wednesday. Two teams of researchers independently reported that in a total of 11 patients, grafts of fetal tissue obtained during abortions sharply reduced tremors and rigidity and increased control of limb functions.
HEALTH
September 9, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Daily insulin injections are lifesaving for diabetics, but to many people they rep-resent a heavy burden that can interfere with their professional and social lives. The wide swings in blood sugar levels that can occur when injections are given only once or twice a day, furthermore, are now known to be the cause of virtually all the complications of diabetes, ranging from nerve damage to heart disease to blindness.
NEWS
June 7, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Canadian researchers have successfully freed eight diabetics from insulin dependence by using a new combination of anti-rejection drugs to transplant insulin-secreting islet cells. All of the subjects have remained insulin-free for four to 15 months, a remarkable rate, because fewer than one in 10 patients who received islet transplants previously were able to escape their daily shots. "This is perhaps the most important finding in Type 1 diabetes research in the past decade," said Dr.
NEWS
April 16, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
When diabetic Rich Shultz received a transplant of pancreatic cells taken from an aborted human fetus two years ago, the Santa Barbara man became a participant in a fast-growing but controversial field of experimental therapy. Many biomedical researchers believe that fetal tissues and cells have enormous potential for helping hundreds of thousands of people with hormone-deficiency disorders such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases, as well as diabetes.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Researchers are developing a bold and unusual new type of transplant operation that they think may eventually be able to restore vision in individuals blinded by the loss of photoreceptor cells--the cells in the eye that convert light into an electrical signal transmitted to the brain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
The first cancer therapy using genetically altered living cells was approved last week, and doctors at the National Institutes of Health said the first patient should start treatment within a few weeks. Steven A. Rosenberg said his team has been poised to start the revolutionary gene therapy in patients critically ill with advanced melanoma, a deadly skin cancer, and was only awaiting the final approval from the Food and Drug Administration.
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