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Cell Transplants

NEWS
July 21, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 50 ethics scholars have signed a letter asking President Bush to support medical research using cells from human embryos, and 61 U.S. senators went on record Friday as supporting the research. "We urge you not to close this door on what might be a critical path to the human future," said the ethicists' letter, which was signed by scholars of Lutheran, Baptist, Jewish, Catholic and other faiths.
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NEWS
October 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
Congress will wait until next year before deciding whether to remove key restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem-cell research that advocates say could lead to cures for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and other diseases. A final attempt to get a bill through the Senate late last month was blocked by Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kan.), a leading abortion opponent. He said embryonic cell research is "illegal, is immoral and it's unnecessary." Supporters of the research, including Sen.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
In the first operation of its kind in California, surgeons at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center have implanted adrenal gland tissues into the brain of a 43-year-old man with Parkinson's disease, it was announced Tuesday. The patient, a former Los Angeles carpet layer, is at least the 46th Parkinson's victim in the world to undergo the experimental surgery and the 11th in the United States. The first U.S. patient underwent the test procedure on April 9 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
A National Institutes of Health advisory committee recommended Wednesday that the organization lift its nine-month ban on federal funds for fetal tissue research. The committee unanimously accepted a report that said the research using fetal tissue from voluntarily induced abortions is morally acceptable in light of the legality of abortion and the possible medical benefits that such research may bring.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reviving a debate over how society should treat the earliest stages of human life, the National Institutes of Health is close to authorizing a plan to fund medical research that relies on the destruction of human embryos. The NIH plan, in the works for more than a year, would clear the way for the first public funding of potentially groundbreaking research on embryo "stem cells," which scientists first isolated only 21 months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An experimental transplant operation designed to free diabetics from insulin injections has produced the most promising results since the technique was developed, researchers reported last week. The procedure enabled five of nine patients to significantly reduce their need for daily insulin injections, including one 16-year-old Louisville, Ky., girl who has remained completely independent of injections for more than six months, the researchers reported. "I'm completely excited," said Dr.
NEWS
November 21, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Twelve days ago Curt Freed, a neurobiologist at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, led a team that implanted brain cells from an aborted fetus into the brain of a 52-year-old victim of Parkinson's disease in hopes of improving the man's condition. It was the first time this operation was performed in the United States.
NEWS
July 16, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the nation's leading stem cell researchers is leaving California to work in Britain, in part because of the political uncertainties surrounding the use of human embryonic material in the United States. The decision by Roger Pedersen of UC San Francisco, which the university confirmed Sunday, is the latest and one of the most dramatic illustrations of the political problems that researchers are facing as they attempt to understand embryonic stem cells.
NEWS
March 10, 1993
In operations that doctors at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center say were the first of their kind, a device that employs the cells of a miniature pig to act as a temporary liver was used on two dying patients while they awaited human liver transplants. Both Cedars-Sinai patients, a 36-year-old woman and a 10-year-old boy, are doing well after the transplants, according to Dr. Achilles A. Demetriou, the physician who developed the device. The procedures were done within the past two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have used genetic engineering techniques to produce cells that can sense the concentration of sugar in the blood and release insulin in response, mimicking cells in the pancreas. Researchers hope that the cells can eventually be transplanted into diabetics to cure the disease, but major kinks have to be ironed out first.
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