Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCell Transplants
IN THE NEWS

Cell Transplants

NEWS
April 26, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Fetal cell transplants and electronic sensors may eventually help restore partial vision in people whose light-sensitive retinal cells have been destroyed by diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, researchers said in Los Angeles on Sunday. In such diseases, which affect at least 1.8 million Americans, nerve pathways from the eye to the brain are functional. Only the eye's ability to detect light is impaired.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Mary Arthur celebrated a milestone this year. She has no pancreas, but Arthur has needed no insulin injections for three years. The reason: a radical new procedure called an islet-cell transplant. It is the longest anyone has survived and remained insulin free with such an implant. Arthur became diabetic as a 15-year-old high-school sophomore when her pancreas--which secretes life-preserving insulin--was removed along with her liver and stomach during cancer surgery.
NEWS
March 10, 1993
In operations that doctors at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center say were the first of their kind, a device that employs the cells of a miniature pig to act as a temporary liver was used on two dying patients while they awaited human liver transplants. Both Cedars-Sinai patients, a 36-year-old woman and a 10-year-old boy, are doing well after the transplants, according to Dr. Achilles A. Demetriou, the physician who developed the device. The procedures were done within the past two weeks.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Major advances in healing damaged spines, the most important cause of paralysis, were reported Wednesday by two independent research groups. One group used fetal cell transplants to restore near-normal function in the rear legs of cats that had suffered paralyzing spinal damage, apparently the first report of such success in any mammal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a study that may have implications in AIDS treatment, Washington researchers have found that transplanted immune cells can provide protection against an often-deadly viral infection in patients whose immune systems cannot protect them. Preliminary results with the technique show that it can protect bone-marrow transplant patients against infections by cytomegalovirus, which can cause lethal pneumonia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two types of experimental surgical procedures have significantly improved the conditions of patients with Parkinson's disease, surgeons said here Wednesday. Two teams of researchers independently reported that in a total of 11 patients, grafts of fetal tissue obtained during abortions sharply reduced tremors and rigidity and increased control of limb functions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have used genetic engineering techniques to produce cells that can sense the concentration of sugar in the blood and release insulin in response, mimicking cells in the pancreas. Researchers hope that the cells can eventually be transplanted into diabetics to cure the disease, but major kinks have to be ironed out first.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
The first cancer therapy using genetically altered living cells was approved last week, and doctors at the National Institutes of Health said the first patient should start treatment within a few weeks. Steven A. Rosenberg said his team has been poised to start the revolutionary gene therapy in patients critically ill with advanced melanoma, a deadly skin cancer, and was only awaiting the final approval from the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Rhonda Gale took a red-eye flight from Los Angeles to Chicago one day in early 1989, arriving in Chicago just as the sun was rising. Carrying a cooler containing vials of her husband's blood, Gale climbed into a limousine and was driven to the University of Chicago Medical School. Medical staff there took the blood from Gale and, several hours later, injected a mixture containing Philip Klein's white blood cells under the skin on Gale's arm. She flew home the same day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An experimental transplant operation designed to free diabetics from insulin injections has produced the most promising results since the technique was developed, researchers reported last week. The procedure enabled five of nine patients to significantly reduce their need for daily insulin injections, including one 16-year-old Louisville, Ky., girl who has remained completely independent of injections for more than six months, the researchers reported. "I'm completely excited," said Dr.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|