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Cell Transplants

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
The first cancer therapy using genetically altered living cells was approved last week, and doctors at the National Institutes of Health said the first patient should start treatment within a few weeks. Steven A. Rosenberg said his team has been poised to start the revolutionary gene therapy in patients critically ill with advanced melanoma, a deadly skin cancer, and was only awaiting the final approval from the Food and Drug Administration.
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NEWS
October 29, 1990 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Rhonda Gale took a red-eye flight from Los Angeles to Chicago one day in early 1989, arriving in Chicago just as the sun was rising. Carrying a cooler containing vials of her husband's blood, Gale climbed into a limousine and was driven to the University of Chicago Medical School. Medical staff there took the blood from Gale and, several hours later, injected a mixture containing Philip Klein's white blood cells under the skin on Gale's arm. She flew home the same day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An experimental transplant operation designed to free diabetics from insulin injections has produced the most promising results since the technique was developed, researchers reported last week. The procedure enabled five of nine patients to significantly reduce their need for daily insulin injections, including one 16-year-old Louisville, Ky., girl who has remained completely independent of injections for more than six months, the researchers reported. "I'm completely excited," said Dr.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move almost certain to reignite the smoldering battle over fetal tissue research, Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) intends to introduce legislation to overturn the ban on federal funding for such work. Scientists believe that fetal tissue research holds extraordinary promise for the treatment of an array of serious illnesses, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, Huntington's disease, leukemia and spinal cord injuries.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Healthy muscle cells implanted into the toe of a 10-year-old boy with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have apparently reversed the effects of the degenerative disease in the boy's toe muscles, a Tennessee researcher reported Saturday. The achievement apparently marks the first time that a genetic defect has been corrected in humans--albeit on a very small scale.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | United Press International
A 9-year-old South Carolina boy has been chosen for the first attempt to treat muscular dystrophy by transplanting healthy muscle cells, researchers said Wednesday. Sam Looper of Pickens, S.C., who has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, was to undergo the experimental operation today at the Le Bonheur Children's Medical Center in Memphis, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A revolutionary, one-time treatment to eliminate organ transplant rejection could be tested in kidney recipients within the next year, a Stanford University researcher reported here last week. The process uses proteins called monoclonal antibodies to trick the immune system into recognizing foreign tissue as its own. It would eliminate the need for lifelong therapy with anti-rejection drugs that are themselves harmful to the body. Speaking at an American Heart Assn. science writers' meeting, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1990 | RICK WEISS, Weiss is life science/biomedicine editor of Science News magazine in Washington, from which this article is adapted.
The timing was ironic. As 12,000 researchers gathered recently at the Society for Neuroscience's annual meeting, Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan extended indefinitely a ban on federally funded fetal tissue transplants. The moratorium, which predominantly affects neuroscientists, forbids federal support for experimental transplants into humans of tissue from intentionally aborted fetuses.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Researchers are developing a bold and unusual new type of transplant operation that they think may eventually be able to restore vision in individuals blinded by the loss of photoreceptor cells--the cells in the eye that convert light into an electrical signal transmitted to the brain.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Brain grafts of adrenal tissues produce "significant improvement" in victims of Parkinson's disease, but the procedure did not work as well as had been hoped and should still be considered experimental, according to the first published report by American physicians on the effectiveness of the controversial procedure.
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