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Cello Concerto

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1989 | TERRY McQUILKIN
Larry Livingston exudes obvious excitement when he talks about the concert tonight by the USC Symphony at Ambassador Auditorium because the event will feature the world premiere of a cello concerto by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Karel Husa, with Lynn Harrell as the soloist. The new work was made possible by a gift from Florence Kerze and Therese Kerze Cheyovich, who have established a fund in memory of their brother, Frank Kerze Jr.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's monthlong 10th-anniversary celebration of the opening of Walt Disney Concert Hall entered Phase 2 on Friday night. Esa-Pekka Salonen was back. And it was old-home week. The former music director's old Finnish friends were on hand for the premiere of Magnus Lindberg's Cello Concerto No. 2, written for soloist Anssi Karttunen. There were other old friends as well - Debussy and Bartók. Both composers were mainstays of Salonen's 17 years leading the L.A. Phil.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS
Two years ago, Lynn Harrell and the USC Symphony under Daniel Lewis premiered the Cello Concerto written for them by Czech-born American composer Karel Husa. But it was in fact only four movements of a five-part work, the unplayed segment--a pizzicato workout for the soloist--requiring revision, information not generally divulged at the time. The missing movement was rumored to be "unplayable."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2010 | By Mark Swed and David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Gustavo Dudamel is known for his energetic and indefatigable presence on the classical-music podium. But on Thursday evening, the 28-year-old Venezuelan conductor's high-impact conducting style apparently caught up with him midway through a concert at Walt Disney Concert Hall. Dudamel injured his neck during a performance of Dvorák's Cello Concerto, featuring the Los Angeles Philharmonic and soloist Alisa Weilerstein. The conductor heard a loud pop and lost sensation in parts of his body during the final movement of the piece, according to Philharmonic President Deborah Borda.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Los Angeles Philharmonic got lucky over the weekend. It happened to have scheduled Elgar's affecting Cello Concerto. Written in 1919 but once thought a dated relic of a British composer's Edwardian visions, it was given a new lease on life in the hip 1960s by Jacqueline Du Pre. And now it has another, thanks to its appearance in the prurient film "Hilary and Jackie," which scrutinizes the cellist's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1994 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
Schumann's four symphonies periodically enter and leave the field of vision of conductors with clout. At the moment, the symphonies are out, which makes welcome their revival on recordings--from which they have been equally absent of late--especially when we're allowed to hear the notes of these much doctored and questionably improved scores pretty much as the composer himself set them down.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1991 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Music director Micah Levy continues to assemble imaginative mixtures for his Orange County Chamber Orchestra programs. Monday night at the Irvine Barclay Theatre, Levy led his band through works by Handel, Haydn and Bloch, but also included a piece by the Canadian Harry Somers and the premiere of a cello concerto written for this group by Lloyd Rodgers. Soloist for the concerto was Canadian-born (1967) Shauna Rolston, who brought energy and elan to a not overly demanding part.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1994 | MARK SWED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Christopher Rouse, the composer who won the Pulitzer Prize in music last year, likes to laugh, likes to talk, likes loud music, likes rock and roll, likes to be slightly outrageous. Some years ago, when composer-in-residence of the Baltimore Symphony, he orchestrated "Twist and Shout" as an encore piece for the orchestra's tour of the then Soviet Union. He famously describes what is probably his best-known orchestra piece, "Bump," as the Boston Pops in Hell.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN
Chronology can be a burden in an arts culture that places overweening emphasis on originality. Had Saint-Saens written these warmly Brahmsian, beautifully shaped works 20 years sooner, they might be repertory staples. Coming as they did in the early 20th century, amid the Impressionist revolution in French music, they were condescendingly greeted as sentimental dinosaurs, and difficult to boot.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2009 | Rick Schultz
There was a heavy Taiwanese presence at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica for the Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra's run-out concert Thursday night. No wonder, what with the sponsorship of the concert by the Taiwanese United Fund and the unveiling of a new Romance for Cello and Orchestra by Taiwanese composer Gordon Chin as played by cellist Felix Fan, whose parents come from Taipei. Ultimately, though, the biggest attention-getter of the night was another Fan solo vehicle, a cello concerto from the bent imagination of Austrian pianist-composer Friedrich Gulda.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
I don't know that Baudelaire meant music in his poem "Invitation to the Voyage," when he thought of a world far away -- exotic, unobtainable, a land lost in love's gaze. "All is order there, and elegance," he wrote, "pleasure, peace and opulence." But I think he did. Music as an outpost of order, pleasure, peace and opulence kept Bartok and Stravinsky sane when their world was not. In 1936, with the Nazi takeover of Hungary inevitable, Bartok turned to fugues and the mathematical Fibonacci series for "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta," one of his most magical scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2005 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Starting their third season Sunday at Westwood United Methodist Church, Young Riddle and his Nimbus Ensemble continued to juxtapose music of J.S. Bach with that of the composer's successors way downstream in the 20th century. That's a durable foundation for a series, as the choice of high-grade material is nearly endless and the inclusion of a "mystery piece" in each concert is an endearing come-on for connoisseurs who like to play "name that tune."
NEWS
January 16, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The world's two most charismatic, most beloved cellists are, without question, Mstislav Rostropovich and Yo-Yo Ma. And there is little chance that Anssi Karttunen could ever challenge their popularity, given that his specialty is difficult new music.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN
Chronology can be a burden in an arts culture that places overweening emphasis on originality. Had Saint-Saens written these warmly Brahmsian, beautifully shaped works 20 years sooner, they might be repertory staples. Coming as they did in the early 20th century, amid the Impressionist revolution in French music, they were condescendingly greeted as sentimental dinosaurs, and difficult to boot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Los Angeles Philharmonic got lucky over the weekend. It happened to have scheduled Elgar's affecting Cello Concerto. Written in 1919 but once thought a dated relic of a British composer's Edwardian visions, it was given a new lease on life in the hip 1960s by Jacqueline Du Pre. And now it has another, thanks to its appearance in the prurient film "Hilary and Jackie," which scrutinizes the cellist's life.
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