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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As a plume of smoke rose from a one-car garage in Santa Ana on Monday morning, neighbors who knew that a family lived inside rushed to pry open its door. The family of three or four people, some of them children, was able to escape by exiting through the house, said Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Steve Concialdi. The 7:50 a.m. blaze in the 1200 block of South Magnolia Avenue was probably sparked by a cellphone charger that short-circuited, he said. Neighbors who were unaware the family had escaped tried frantically to open the garage's tightly shut doors as they called 911. “The garage was secure, so the neighbors couldn't get in from the outside; and even if the fire started inside the house, they could be trapped because it has no windows,” Concialdi said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
A cat-and-mouse thriller imported from Paraguay, "7 Boxes" evokes the developing-world amorality and senseless crime caper of "City of God," the 2002 Brazilian sensation that earned four Academy Award nominations, including one for Fernando Meirelles' slick, hyper-stylized direction. But whereas Meirelles seemed to apply absolutely every cinematic trick in the book, "7 Boxes" directors Juan Carlos Maneglia and Tana Schémbori aren't as hell-bent on making an impression. Their film boasts a rather universal premise: Teenager Victor (Celso Franco)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
Twenty years after the Northridge earthquake, experts say a huge temblor across Southern California today could cripple cellphone and Wi-Fi Internet service. Seismic safety officials increasingly have been studying how telecommunications would be affected after a quake even bigger than Northridge and expressed concerns it would make communications difficult for days or longer. Like water and gas lines, most Southern California Internet lines run across the San Andreas Fault, and officials fear the Big One could cut off service.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
Low-income Californians will be soon eligible for what has become to many an essential part of daily life: a cellphone . Participants in the state's LifeLine program for low-income consumers will soon have access to reduced-cost smartphone service with voice, data and text capabilities, state regulators decided Thursday. After two years of deliberations, the five members of the California Public Utilities Commission voted unanimously to include wireless phones among the kinds of handsets available through the LifeLine program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
In the 20 years since the Northridge earthquake, the state's freeway bridges have been strengthened. A new generation of hospitals, schools and university buildings designed to better withstand a massive quake has risen. But for all those strides, changes in society and technology have left California vulnerable in other ways. The 1994 Northridge disaster occurred in an era before Wi-Fi computer access and at a time when cellphones were still something of a rarity. Seismic safety experts say that if a huge quake strikes the state now, both services would be interrupted - possibly for days.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
A stage, a sound system, musicians and a crowd. That's all you really need to put on a concert. Everything else - $12 beer, nachos, jumbo video screens, light show, 3-D glasses, VIP meet-and-greets, merch, vapor pen for your "medical marijuana" - is gravy. Even the $75-million renovation of the Los Angeles Forum isn't going to guarantee a good show. As a rule in watching musicians at work, a smaller space is usually preferable. This is creative expression, and at its best it's the most intimate nonsexual exchange you can have with a stranger.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
The chief executive of one of America's largest airlines vowed to keep phones silent on flights, despite some rumblings in Washington about lifting the ban on cellphone calls. Delta Air Lines CEO Richard Anderson told his employees Wednesday that the airline won't allow cellular or Internet-based calls, regardless of any changes in policy by the Federal Communications Commission. He is not the first. Southwest Airlines, the nation's largest domestic carrier, also announced recently that it won't allow cellphone calls but, it will offer its passengers Internet service on most planes from takeoff to landing.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Is the great airplane cellphone scare already over?  The backlash provoked by the Federal Communications Commission's plan to lift its ban on cellphone use on airplanes has won two high-profile adherents -- the CEOs of Southwest and Delta, who both announced that their companies won't be allowing voice calls on their flights. Delta CEO Richard Anderson was especially blunt, telling employees in a memo that the company won't be allowing "cellular calls or Internet-based voice communications onboard Delta or Delta Connection flights.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2013 | By Hugo Martin, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
A week after a federal agency began the process of lifting the ban on cellphone calls on planes, the chief executive of one of the nation's largest airlines vowed to keep phones silent on his company's flights. The chief executive of Delta Air Lines, Richard Anderson, told his employees Wednesday that the airline won't allow cellular or Internet-based calls, regardless of any changes in policy by the Federal Communications Commission. He is not the first. Southwest Airlines, the nation's largest domestic carrier, also announced recently that it won't allow cellphone calls but, it will offer its passengers Internet service on most planes from takeoff to landing.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Greg Benson, actor and funnyman, has a new prank video climbing the YouTube charts. "Cell Phone Crashing at the Airport" has Benson and his hidden camera (operated by wife Kim Evey) crowding people at an airport as they talk on their phones. Benson, on his MediocreFilms, has crashed cellphone conversations before -- at a park, a soccer game, on the streets of San Francisco . He responds to others' conversations into his own phone. It takes a moment for people to register the pleasant-looking man invading their space.
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