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Cellular Telephones

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1995
A man was arrested Thursday after sheriff's deputies raided his home and seized 15 illegally cloned cellular telephones and the laptop computer used to program them, officials said. Patrick Ray, 21, was taken into custody without incident at his apartment in the 600 block of Bonita Avenue and was being held on $25,000 bail, the deputies said. Ray may be responsible for cellular phone company losses of "close to a million dollars," Sgt. Steve Biagini of the sheriff's Temple City station said.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 2012 | Richard Verrier
Looking to buck the line at the Regency Bruin in Westwood? It's fine if you bring your smartphone. Within a few weeks, you'll be able to skip the box-office line and head straight to your seat by swiping your mobile device over a scanner. It can read the bar code of an electronic ticket purchased with an app that also gives show times, movie reviews and seating information. Phones in the theater were once regarded as a nuisance, or worse -- the embodiment of a mobile revolution that was dragging consumers away from the multiplex.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
GM Hughes Electronics has developed technology it says will increase the capacity of cellular phone systems fifteen-fold--a boon to overcrowded systems in cities such as New York and Los Angeles. The entrance of the General Motors Corp. subsidiary into the race for the next-generation cellular technology appears promising, but it will only increase an industry battle over which system eventually will be used, industry analysts said. The Cellular Telecommunications Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2010 | David Sarno
In a rare nod toward digital openness, Apple Inc. on Thursday loosened rules about the types of applications and advertisements that can run on its iPhone family of mobile products. Earlier this year, Apple had in effect choked off a range of applications that were originally created for other devices — the personal computer or Android-based phones, for instance — forcing developers to adopt specific Apple-approved programming methods. That didn't sit well with many programmers, who generally like to win the largest audiences they can by getting their games and apps on a number of different devices.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | DAN BIERS, Associated Press
The rage of Hong Kong these days is easy to spot. Just look for the tiny antennas, the telltale sign of the portable telephones so many people are carrying wherever they go. Despite price tags of $2,000 or more, the hand-held telephones have become a huge hit in this British colony, where doing business is a 24-hour preoccupation and new status symbols are always in demand. Downtown streets are filled with professionals ready for business, with the cellular phones tucked under their arms or stuffed, antenna-up, into briefcases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1987 | TRACY THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Demand for cellular telephones has grown rapidly since their introduction four years ago--the number of cellular users nationally has now surpassed the 1-million mark. There are now two companies serving Southern California--PacTel Cellular and Los Angeles Cellular. PacTel's system, covering Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties, is the nation's largest in terms of the number of cell sites, covering more than 9,200 square miles.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Odetics Inc. announced new technology Tuesday that can send video images over cellular telephones, opening the way for new uses of the long-distance video technology in markets such as remote monitoring and security. The Anaheim company said the video communications technology can transmit black-and-white or color images of a scene from a security camera to a monitor elsewhere. "Odetics will not live or die on the success of this technology," said David Lewis, an Odetics vice president.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1990 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When comic strip hero Dick Tracy needed to call the police chief, he never bothered rifling through his pockets for loose change. The famous detective simply pushed a few buttons on his two-way wrist radio and, voila , he had headquarters on the line. The comic strip's creators could not have known just how sophisticated telephone communications would become in the 1990s.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking global telecommunications a giant step forward, Motorola Inc. is expected to unveil plans today for a $2-billion network of orbiting satellites to provide cellular telephone service to remote stretches of the planet.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1990
Motorola Inc. has signed a $5-million contract to provide cellular telephones toHungary. Motorola said the deal makes it the first company to supply mobile phones in EasternEurope.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2010 | By Mike Clary and Jon Burstein
To crack the case of a speeding Porsche that left two men dead, Fort Lauderdale police turned to a federal crime-fighting ally: the Secret Service. The government agency that protects the president and zealously pursues counterfeiters played a role in the investigation by analyzing cellphone records for the car's owner and one of his friends, police records show. The analysis helped lead to vehicular homicide charges against the Porsche's owner, Ryan LeVin, who is now in the Broward County Jail without bail.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By David Sarno
The Federal Communications Commission asked the nation's major telecommunications firms and Google Inc. to explain to the agency the industry's often unpopular practice of charging consumers to end their cellphone service early, a penalty known as an early-termination fee. The agency sent a set of questions -- including asking why the fees are needed at all -- in letters to AT&T Inc., Verizon Wireless, Sprint Nextel Corp., T-Mobile USA and Google. "This is an essential step to ensuring that consumers have the information that helps them make informed choices in a competitive marketplace," the FCC said.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn
Google Inc.'s new cellphone has gotten a winning endorsement from Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Wozniak. Wozniak, a self-proclaimed "gadget freak" who left Apple in 1987, remains one of the biggest fans of its products. He stood in line in 2007 to buy the first iPhone because he couldn't wait for Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs to send him one. He didn't have to wait for the Nexus One. Google Inc. executive Andy Rubin gave one to him. Wozniak first praised the phone this month at an NBC station in the Bay Area.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2010 | David Sarno
Google Inc. said Tuesday that the launch of two new mobile phones in China has been delayed, a move that showed the company's clash with Beijing is crimping more than just its search business. Google-powered handsets from Motorola Corp. and Samsung were scheduled to be unveiled today from China Unicom, one of the Asian nation's largest telecommunications providers. Google said last week that it might shut down its search engine in China in the wake of a sophisticated cyber attack originating in China that resulted in the theft of intellectual property from the company's servers, as well as the targeting of human rights activists' e-mail accounts.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
A new nonprofit group dedicated to discouraging people from using cellphones while driving says it will model itself on Mothers Against Drunk Driving, the organization that has been so successful in raising awareness about the dangers of operating a vehicle while intoxicated. Called FocusDriven and sponsored in part by the U.S. Department of Transportation, the organization has several members who have lost loved ones in traffic collisions involving drivers who were distracted by their mobile phones.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn
In an ambitious bid to expand its reach even to consumers on the go, Google Inc. on Tuesday unveiled the widely anticipated Nexus One smart phone as it launched a bold new business model that could shake up the mobile phone industry. The Internet giant began selling the phone -- manufactured to its specifications by a Taiwanese firm -- directly to consumers through its website rather than through retail outlets and service providers. Although initially available only with T-Mobile service, the phone could eventually be used on other networks, including Verizon Wireless and Vodafone Group in Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 564-1038
The Police Department gave 30 city letter carriers cellular telephones this week as part of a partnership between the department and the U.S. Postal Service. The phones are programmed with an emergency number; if a letter carrier notices a crime in progress, he or she is to call that number and police will be dispatched. Each letter carrier received training from police on spotting potential crimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2009 | By Maria L. La Ganga
San Francisco officials are debating whether to make this famously liberal city the first in the nation to require retailers to prominently post the amount of radiation emitted by cellphones. Although there is no scientific consensus that the ubiquitous devices cause health problems, Mayor Gavin Newsom plans to call for an ordinance next month that would require the conspicuous display of radiation levels wherever the phones are sold. Some hail the proposal as evidence of San Francisco's long tradition of environmental activism; this was the first city in America to ban plastic bags and prohibit a class of chemicals called phthalates from use in children's products.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2009 | By Nicole Santa Cruz
We're becoming a nation of texters. According to data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau, Americans fired off 110 billion text messages in December 2008. In the same month in 2007, they sent 48 billion. Not surprisingly, the trend is especially prevalent among teenagers, said Amanda Lenhart, a senior research specialist for the Pew Internet and American Life Project. "Teens are still developing their communication habits. Adults have preset ones already," she said.
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