Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCensorship
IN THE NEWS

Censorship

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The lingering symbol of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games--the statues of two nude, headless athletes at the peristyle entrance of the Coliseum--will remain undraped during the start of the Olympic torch relay Saturday morning.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto says a proposed new telecommunications law would finally break up Mexico's powerful and much-criticized TV and telephone monopolies. The proposal and other reforms have generated considerable praise abroad for Peña Nieto and his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which ruled the country for seven decades before a 12-year hiatus and a return to power in late 2012. But a growing number of domestic critics are reading the fine print of the telecommunications plan and finding many things to worry about.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | JOE McDONALD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The painting of Mao Tse-tung as a Renaissance saint was too risky for the Shanghai 2000 Biennial. The photo of a man eating a dead baby was too disturbing. The works, rejected by the Shanghai Art Museum's official contemporary art show, went on display at private galleries. That's when police raided a gallery and seized the exhibits. The two-month Biennial, with 67 artists from 15 countries, is China's bid to join the club of biannual art extravaganzas led by Venice and New York City.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- LinkedIn is launching a Chinese language website to expand its presence in China, which boasts the world's largest Internet population. The Mountain View, Calif., company is hoping the website, which uses simplified Chinese characters, will bring 140 million new Chinese professionals to the networking service. LinkedIn currently has 4 million users in China, where it has a website in English and mobile app in Chinese. When it officially begins operating in China, it will be the only major social network with a presence there.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
What did it mean? The half-page ad--echoing the tone of loyalty oaths that cowardly television networks made their employees sign during the "Red-scare" frenzy in the decade following World War II--appeared in several hundred newspapers Nov. 4-5. Out of the blue. No explanation. This was the title: "An Open Letter to the American People." This was the text: "Burger King wishes to go on record as supporting traditional American values on television, especially the importance of the family.
OPINION
May 22, 2012
Re "Silencing Sebelius," Editorial, May 18 Last month, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishopscondemned Rep. Paul D. Ryan's (R-Wis.) budget as contrary to Roman Catholic social doctrine. Also, dozens of faculty members at Georgetown University issued an open letter protesting Ryan's speech at the school. Yet The Times did not editorialize on this attempt to "silence" Ryan. At issue here is not the silencing of Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, but a protest against a Catholic institution providing a forum to a Catholic who has publicly challenged the doctrines of her own faith.
OPINION
January 3, 2006
Re "Journalism on trial," editorial, Dec. 30 Why get so exercised about the punishment of journalists in China when the voluntary press censorship regarding government policies and behavior is so blatant right here at home? If, three years ago and ever since, our nation's press had been less eager to support obviously dangerous policies, and warned this administration regarding war in the Middle East, we wouldn't be sunk in the mire of the present war in Iraq. Voluntary censorship is just about as bad as state-ordered censorship, because the end results are the same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1994
Regarding Coleen Ary's letter regarding birth control education (Jan. 15), I have only this to say: Coleen, you just don't get it. This is not an issue of birth control; it is an issue of control, period. We students are "angry" all right, but it is not merely against your group's desire to deny birth control education to us. It is against your group's desire to censor education itself. Censoring birth control information is the beginning of banning books, inclusion of prayer in schools and other acts of censorship supporting the views of religious extremists seeking to control public education nationwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Chinese author Mo Yan was announced in October as the recipient of the Nobel Prize in literature; he's in Sweden now and will be presented with the award Monday. It was at a news conference in Stockholm that Mo made his disappointing statements in support of censorship. The Associated Press reports, "Mo said he doesn't feel that censorship should stand in the way of truth but that any defamation, or rumors, ' should be censored .' " The Nobel laureate then compared censorship to airport security checks.
WORLD
January 8, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
GUANGZHOU, China -- Communist Party officials appear to have defused a potential crisis over media censorship in Guangzhou with a compromise that persuaded journalists at a maverick newspaper to publish Thursday as planned. The journalists at Southern Weekly, one of China's boldest and most popular publications, had threatened to strike in protest over a New Year's editorial on political reform that was watered down by propaganda officials. The exact terms of the deal were not released, but it appears that the journalists agreed to refrain from airing their grievances in public about Tuo Zhen, the propaganda chief for Guangdong province accused of the heavy-handed censorship that sparked the standoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
This week, the Kids' Right to Read Project, a group that monitors book censorship, said the number of challenges to books reported to the group increased by 53% in 2013. Project coordinator Acacia O'Connor told Shelf Awareness that she could not explain the increase, but that many involved writers of color, including Sherman Alexie, Toni Morrison and Alice Walker. (All three also appear regularly on American Booksellers Assn. lists of challenged books.) “Whether or not patterns like this are the result of coordination between would-be censors across the country is impossible to say,” O'Connor told Shelf Awareness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Chinese authorities said Wednesday they would relax some restrictions on film, TV and radio productions, though the immediate impact of the changes was unclear and several prominent movie directors said they did not believe the reforms were game-changers. Chinese filmmakers will now be allowed to shoot “ordinary content” movies after only submitting a synopsis to censors rather than a full script, according to an announcement from the State Council, China's cabinet.  But the finished products will still have to be screened for censors before they are approved to be played in theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Alexander Nazaryan
Eight years ago, a New York journalist named Peter Braunstein, then 41, forced his way into the apartment of a 34-year-old Manhattan woman by pretending to be a firefighter. He proceeded to drug the woman, a former colleague, and sexually assault her for more than 12 hours. Now, as he serves a lengthy prison sentence in upstate New York, Braunstein is apparently upset that corrections officials there are not allowing him to read Jaycee Dugard's “A Stolen Life,” the 2011 memoir of a young woman's kidnapping and 18-year imprisonment by a California couple, Phillip and Nancy Garrido, which ended in 2009.
WORLD
April 12, 2013 | By Janet Stobart, This post has been corrected. See note below.
LONDON -- The British Broadcasting Corp. faced a dilemma Friday: Would it play "Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead" when everyone knows the song has become a biting reference to the late Margaret Thatcher? The network's solution: turn the song into a sound bite. Amid divisive reactions to the death of the former prime minister on Monday, anti-Thatcher protesters have campaigned to bring the song from the 1939 film "The Wizard of Oz" to the top of the charts in time for a BBC program Sunday night that counts down the current top hits.
WORLD
January 9, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
GUANGZHOU, China - Like wedding guests separated across the aisle, the protesters assembled on either side of a gated driveway at the headquarters of the embattled Southern Weekly newspaper. To the right, several dozen supporters of the newspaper staff waved banners calling for an end to censorship of the Chinese press. "Freedom!" they chanted. "Democracy!" "Constitutional rights!" To the left, beneath fluttering red Chinese flags and hoisted portraits of Mao Tse-tung, a battalion of mostly older men shouted into a microphone, trying to drown out their ideological rivals.
WORLD
January 8, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
GUANGZHOU, China -- Communist Party officials appear to have defused a potential crisis over media censorship in Guangzhou with a compromise that persuaded journalists at a maverick newspaper to publish Thursday as planned. The journalists at Southern Weekly, one of China's boldest and most popular publications, had threatened to strike in protest over a New Year's editorial on political reform that was watered down by propaganda officials. The exact terms of the deal were not released, but it appears that the journalists agreed to refrain from airing their grievances in public about Tuo Zhen, the propaganda chief for Guangdong province accused of the heavy-handed censorship that sparked the standoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1986
U.S. District Judge A. Wallace Tashima reached the only possible conclusion recently in the case brought on behalf of six films that had been denied "certificates of educational character" by the United States Information Agency. The judge properly ruled that the process by which the agency chooses which films to certify, thereby granting them favorable tax treatment abroad, is unconstitutional on its face. The government may not decide what is truth.
WORLD
January 9, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
GUANGZHOU, China - Like wedding guests separated across the aisle, the protesters assembled on either side of a gated driveway at the headquarters of the embattled Southern Weekly newspaper. To the right, several dozen supporters of the newspaper staff waved banners calling for an end to censorship of the Chinese press. "Freedom!" they chanted. "Democracy!" "Constitutional rights!" To the left, beneath fluttering red Chinese flags and hoisted portraits of Mao Tse-tung, a battalion of mostly older men shouted into a microphone, trying to drown out their ideological rivals.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By David Pierson
BEIJING -- For years, China's net nannies turned the other cheek to a loophole in their vast online censorship apparatus. Anyone who wanted access to blocked overseas websites such as Twitter, Facebook, and more recently, the New York Times, need only download foreign software called a virtual private network (VPN) to circumvent the Great Firewall. But in recent weeks, even these tools have begun to falter, frustrating tech-savvy Chinese and foreign businesspeople who now struggle to access Internet sites as innocuous as gmail.com and imdb.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Chinese author Mo Yan was announced in October as the recipient of the Nobel Prize in literature; he's in Sweden now and will be presented with the award Monday. It was at a news conference in Stockholm that Mo made his disappointing statements in support of censorship. The Associated Press reports, "Mo said he doesn't feel that censorship should stand in the way of truth but that any defamation, or rumors, ' should be censored .' " The Nobel laureate then compared censorship to airport security checks.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|