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Censorship Czechoslovakia

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NEWS
December 15, 1988
Czechoslovakia plans to end its jamming of broadcasts by U.S.-funded Radio Free Europe, the state news agency CTK said. It did not give a date for when the jamming might stop. The decision follows a similar one last month by the Soviet Union. Moscow stopped jamming Radio Liberty, also sponsored by the United States, and reduced its efforts to block other Western broadcasts.
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NEWS
November 28, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a playwright and a former Communist Party leader are the George Washington and Benjamin Franklin of the Czechoslovak revolution, then a collection of technicians, drivers and clerks who call themselves "the Garage Men" are its Paul Revere.
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NEWS
December 18, 1988
Czechoslovakia has stopped jamming Radio Free Europe after two decades, and the U.S.-supported network urged Bulgaria--the only Soviet Bloc country that continues to block its signals--to end the practice. The Czechoslovak government said the jamming ended Friday. "We will be happy to get our message through at last," said Bill Marsh, executive vice president of the Munich, West Germany-based Radio Free Europe.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | From United Press International
The government newspaper Monday implicitly criticized Warsaw Pact allies Czechoslovakia and East Germany in harsh terms for hampering East Bloc political reforms, a day after the Hungarian Communist Party announced approval of multi-party politics. "In many countries of Eastern Europe there is a political, economic and moral crisis," the official newspaper Magyar Nemzet said.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | From United Press International
The government newspaper Monday implicitly criticized Warsaw Pact allies Czechoslovakia and East Germany in harsh terms for hampering East Bloc political reforms, a day after the Hungarian Communist Party announced approval of multi-party politics. "In many countries of Eastern Europe there is a political, economic and moral crisis," the official newspaper Magyar Nemzet said.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a playwright and a former Communist Party leader are the George Washington and Benjamin Franklin of the Czechoslovak revolution, then a collection of technicians, drivers and clerks who call themselves "the Garage Men" are its Paul Revere.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | Associated Press
A literary weekly has published for the first time in this country excerpts from "Dr. Zhivago," the 1955 novel by Soviet author Boris Pasternak. The journal also carried an article complaining about stagnation in Czechoslovak culture. Passages from "Dr. Zhivago," a book banned for decades throughout the Soviet Bloc, were published in the latest issue of Kmen (Trunk), the weekly of the Czechoslovak Writers' Union.
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | Associated Press
A cultural weekly has printed an article on author Franz Kafka, whose works are highly acclaimed in the West but have been disparaged and barely acknowledged in his native Prague. The periodical Tvorba opened its 1 1/2-page article on Kafka's last completed novel, "The Castle," with a plea to reassess long-ignored Czechoslovak and foreign literature.
NEWS
January 30, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
A religious revival that in recent years has been spreading slowly but steadily through Czechoslovakia seems to be gathering force and putting increased pressure on the authorities to ease their longstanding repression of the Roman Catholic Church. A team of Vatican negotiators has been meeting with government officials here this week in an effort to end a 15-year impasse over the appointment of bishops. There are 13 bishoprics in the country, and 11 of them are vacant.
SPORTS
January 30, 1985
The last time St. John's was rated No. 1 was in December of 1951. The Redmen played their next game at Kentucky and lost, 81-40. It remains the worst defeat in the school's history. The St. John's coach was Frank McGuire, now director of college basketball at Madison Square Garden. "That was one of Adolph Rupp's most talented teams," McGuire recalled. "They had Cliff Hagan, Frank Ramsey, Lou Tsioropoulos." St.
NEWS
December 18, 1988
Czechoslovakia has stopped jamming Radio Free Europe after two decades, and the U.S.-supported network urged Bulgaria--the only Soviet Bloc country that continues to block its signals--to end the practice. The Czechoslovak government said the jamming ended Friday. "We will be happy to get our message through at last," said Bill Marsh, executive vice president of the Munich, West Germany-based Radio Free Europe.
NEWS
December 15, 1988
Czechoslovakia plans to end its jamming of broadcasts by U.S.-funded Radio Free Europe, the state news agency CTK said. It did not give a date for when the jamming might stop. The decision follows a similar one last month by the Soviet Union. Moscow stopped jamming Radio Liberty, also sponsored by the United States, and reduced its efforts to block other Western broadcasts.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | Associated Press
A literary weekly has published for the first time in this country excerpts from "Dr. Zhivago," the 1955 novel by Soviet author Boris Pasternak. The journal also carried an article complaining about stagnation in Czechoslovak culture. Passages from "Dr. Zhivago," a book banned for decades throughout the Soviet Bloc, were published in the latest issue of Kmen (Trunk), the weekly of the Czechoslovak Writers' Union.
NEWS
January 30, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
A religious revival that in recent years has been spreading slowly but steadily through Czechoslovakia seems to be gathering force and putting increased pressure on the authorities to ease their longstanding repression of the Roman Catholic Church. A team of Vatican negotiators has been meeting with government officials here this week in an effort to end a 15-year impasse over the appointment of bishops. There are 13 bishoprics in the country, and 11 of them are vacant.
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | Associated Press
A cultural weekly has printed an article on author Franz Kafka, whose works are highly acclaimed in the West but have been disparaged and barely acknowledged in his native Prague. The periodical Tvorba opened its 1 1/2-page article on Kafka's last completed novel, "The Castle," with a plea to reassess long-ignored Czechoslovak and foreign literature.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last fall, Czechoslovakian high school teacher Eva Jamrichova witnessed the wonder of Vaclav Havel's "Velvet Revolution," which triumphantly ended more than 40 years of Communist rule in her native land. This fall, Jamrichova will bring her eyewitness accounts to San Gabriel High School, where she will teach world history on a Fulbright exchange program that is also taking San Gabriel High School teacher Ben Molnar to Bratislava, Czechoslovakia.
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