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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A New York sculptor and the federal official who ordered two of his nude figures removed from a new federal building issued a joint statement Friday saying they expect to resolve the dispute by making undisclosed alterations to the sculpture site, but not to the sculpture. Clearly seeking to defuse what had become a heated public arts controversy, the two sides said they were exploring "site enhancements" to "minimize the possibility of vandalism" to the two female figures.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1993 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The age-old debate about the definition of art has been revived in an unlikely forum, Los Angeles City Hall, with the bureaucrat who heads the city's arts programs reaching the following conclusions: A banner depicting a dog being roasted on a spit is not art. Lecterns adorned with female genitalia are.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1988 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A photographer whose work is being exhibited in the city-owned Los Angeles Photography Center has charged that his premier picture was censored because "it had a gun in it." The photograph, taken by Santa Barbara photographer Kevin McKiernan for an exhibit called "Images of Central America," shows Salvadoran voters in a 1984 election line next to a soldier with a machine gun over his shoulder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1992 | BOB POOL
A controversial exhibition of nude paintings received a last-minute reprieve Wednesday as operators of a Los Angeles coffeehouse ground out a compromise with a neighboring synagogue that viewed the artwork as obscene. The paintings of naked women will be moved to the rear of the Insomnia coffee house--out of sight of members of the orthodox Congregation Saarei Tefila across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1988 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
The publisher of Cal State L.A.'s student newspaper, after a series of battles with university administrators over press freedom, has been fired. Joan Zyda, a former newspaper reporter and editor, reacted angrily to her abrupt dismissal, accusing the university's administrators Thursday of having a "high school mentality" toward college journalism in their attempts to discourage negative reporting about campus activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A government official, who this week ordered that two nude figures be removed from a new federal building in downtown Los Angeles, will meet with the artist in the hopes of amicably resolving a dispute that has infuriated art aficionados and civil libertarians.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Since August we have been watching the people of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union topple sculptures erected by government officials and bureaucrats as powerful symbols of state authority. By stunning contrast, last week in Los Angeles we witnessed American government officials and bureaucrats topple a sculpture erected by the people as a powerful symbol of liberty and triumph over tyranny. Forgive me for being dense, but isn't something a bit out of whack here?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Los Angeles area law enforcement officials are uncomfortable with some of the gangbanger sentiments expressed by N.W.A, but don't view the rap group as a threat. "It's not very welcome," said Lt. Joe Flores, adjutant to the Compton chief of police. "But it's a fad and I don't think it's going to have an adverse effect on the community. . . ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1993 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The age-old debate about the definition of art has been revived in an unlikely forum, Los Angeles City Hall, with the bureaucrat who heads the city's arts programs reaching the following conclusions: A banner depicting a dog being roasted on a spit is not art. Lecterns adorned with female genitalia are.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal official's decision to remove nude figures from a new government building in downtown Los Angeles prompted protests Wednesday from arts and public interest groups who contend that the move suppresses freedom of expression and may violate a landmark law protecting artists' rights. "A lot of people in the arts community are really upset about this," said Adofo V. Nodal, general manager of the city's Cultural Affairs Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The espresso and the cappuccino weren't the only things steaming Tuesday at the newly opened Insomnia coffeehouse in the Fairfax district of Los Angeles. Artist Tommy Dougherty was, too. Two dozen of his expressionistic paintings--including some depicting bare-breasted women--may face banishment because of complaints from the leader of a synagogue across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A New York sculptor and the federal official who ordered two of his nude figures removed from a new federal building issued a joint statement Friday saying they expect to resolve the dispute by making undisclosed alterations to the sculpture site, but not to the sculpture. Clearly seeking to defuse what had become a heated public arts controversy, the two sides said they were exploring "site enhancements" to "minimize the possibility of vandalism" to the two female figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley, calling the removal of nude sculptures from a new Los Angeles federal building an "arbitrary action" that impinges on constitutional rights to freedom of expression, has requested that the two figures be reinstated immediately. In a letter made public Monday, Bradley asked Edwin Thomas, regional administrator of the federal General Services Administration, to restore figures of a woman and a baby immediately and to hold a public hearing on their removal.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Since August we have been watching the people of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union topple sculptures erected by government officials and bureaucrats as powerful symbols of state authority. By stunning contrast, last week in Los Angeles we witnessed American government officials and bureaucrats topple a sculpture erected by the people as a powerful symbol of liberty and triumph over tyranny. Forgive me for being dense, but isn't something a bit out of whack here?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A government official, who this week ordered that two nude figures be removed from a new federal building in downtown Los Angeles, will meet with the artist in the hopes of amicably resolving a dispute that has infuriated art aficionados and civil libertarians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal official's decision to remove nude figures from a new government building in downtown Los Angeles prompted protests Wednesday from arts and public interest groups who contend that the move suppresses freedom of expression and may violate a landmark law protecting artists' rights. "A lot of people in the arts community are really upset about this," said Adofo V. Nodal, general manager of the city's Cultural Affairs Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1992 | BOB POOL
A controversial exhibition of nude paintings received a last-minute reprieve Wednesday as operators of a Los Angeles coffeehouse ground out a compromise with a neighboring synagogue that viewed the artwork as obscene. The paintings of naked women will be moved to the rear of the Insomnia coffee house--out of sight of members of the orthodox Congregation Saarei Tefila across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The espresso and the cappuccino weren't the only things steaming Tuesday at the newly opened Insomnia coffeehouse in the Fairfax district of Los Angeles. Artist Tommy Dougherty was, too. Two dozen of his expressionistic paintings--including some depicting bare-breasted women--may face banishment because of complaints from the leader of a synagogue across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within hours of a complaint by Rep. Edward R. Roybal, the federal General Services Administration removed portions of an anatomically explicit sculpture at a downtown federal building that will bear Roybal's name when it opens next month. Two female figures created by renowned sculptor Tom Otterness were removed from the central plaza of the high-rise building after dark Monday at the direction of GSA Regional Administrator Edwin Thomas. "The congressman . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Los Angeles area law enforcement officials are uncomfortable with some of the gangbanger sentiments expressed by N.W.A, but don't view the rap group as a threat. "It's not very welcome," said Lt. Joe Flores, adjutant to the Compton chief of police. "But it's a fad and I don't think it's going to have an adverse effect on the community. . . ."
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