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Census 2000

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NEWS
April 17, 2000 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A note from a big mucky-muck at the Census Bureau to the American people . . . Many citizens have complained that the 2000 census is too intrusive. As usual, your government has heard you, and a solution is already in place. All you complainers will receive a new, improved census form next month. Thank you. Signed, Mr. Mucky-Muck * 1) Your name: 2) Your Social Security number: 3) Your credit card number and expiration date (the one with the highest credit limit): 4) Do you drive to work?
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NATIONAL
March 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
After crunching more numbers, the Census Bureau now says it over-counted by 1.3 million people in 2000 instead of missing more than 3 million. The findings show an over-count of whites, Asians, American Indians on reservations and young children, while many blacks and Hispanics were missed. The estimate will not affect the government's official population count of 281.4 million in 2000, Census Bureau director C. Louis Kincannon said.
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NEWS
July 15, 1997 | Associated Press
The Census Bureau delivered on its promise to send Congress details of its plan for the 2000 national head count, but it wasn't what Republicans wanted to hear. The new report details and defends the bureau's previously announced plans to use statistical sampling to account for people that can't be reached by census takers. "Our plan won't make the census perfect, but it will make it a lot better," Census Director Martha Farnsworth Riche said Monday. But Rep. J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2002 | Robin Fields, Times Staff Writer
Census 2000 failed to count 509,012 Californians, more than half of them in the Southland, according to a set of much-debated, statistically revised figures released Friday by the U.S. Census Bureau. Almost 300,000 of those overlooked were Latino, the agency said. More than 25% were children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2000 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something kept drawing Nampet Panichpant to Trabuco Road in Irvine. At first, she thought it was the golf range. She parked, got out of her van and approached the manager to see if she could leave U.S. Census posters and literature for customers to peruse. Panichpant knew that Korean American golfers frequented the range after work, and she figured it was a good business for her to target. As one of 44 community partnership specialists working for the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO and SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
You know who you are. Maybe you are an uncurable procrastinator. Or perhaps you relish being a government scofflaw. Whatever your excuse, get ready for a knock at your door as the U.S. Census Bureau kicks off the second wave of its national head count today by tracking down the thousands of residents who didn't mail in their forms. The phase is officially known as the "non-response follow-up," which means the agency will launch a massive, block-by-block campaign lasting up to six weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1999 | ANN L. KIM
The U.S. Census Bureau will hold open houses next week in Van Nuys, Glendale, Woodland Hills and Santa Clarita to officially mark the beginning of local tallying efforts. The open houses in the San Fernando Valley and 14 other Census 2000 offices in Los Angeles will coincide with similar events in 24 California counties and Hawaii. Officials scheduled to address the public at the Valley events include state Sen.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An Arab American organization based in Washington accused the U.S. government of discrimination by barring many Arab immigrants from U.S. Census Bureau jobs counting the nation's population. The Census Bureau denied the contention, saying it hires qualified workers regardless of national origin or religion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2000 | Tariq Malik, (714) 520-2503
City officials are doubling their efforts this week to reach out to residents and meet Saturday's target date for Census 2000. City officials plan to hang a banner across La Habra Boulevard in front of City Hall to remind residents to fill out their census forms. Earlier this year, City Council members approved $10,000 for the formation of a census outreach group to serve the city and encourage residents to be counted.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1999
The Census Bureau won't be sending out its questionnaires until March, but the federal agency responsible for keeping track of the U.S. population will open a questionnaire-processing center in Pomona this week. The Pomona Census 2000 Data Capture Center will use advanced image-capture and optical-character-recognition technology to scan hundreds of millions of pages of forms to translate handwritten responses into computer code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Los Angeles and several other municipalities have lost a bid to force the federal government to statistically adjust the results of the 2000 census to account for people who were missed. The federal government did not violate census laws when officials refused to use statistical, or sampling, methods to recount census results, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. The decision upheld a federal district court ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE and ERIN CHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A broad decline in household income during the 1990s struck hard at middle-class and upper-middle-class neighborhoods across Southern California, part of a complex erosion triggered in part by the collapse of the aerospace industry, according to census statistics being released today. Although the effects were most pronounced in such places as Porter Ranch, Hancock Park and Mission Viejo, there was no geographic pattern to the declines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2002 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California has the highest percentage of poor families and poorly educated residents among the nation's large metropolitan areas, according to data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County area has the highest percentage of residents with less than a ninth-grade education, the lowest percentage of those who have completed high school and the highest percentage of families in poverty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2002 | CLAIRE LUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's per-student spending jumped from the previous year, although it still lags behind the national average, according to census figures from 2000 released Thursday. The state spent $6,298 per elementary and secondary school pupil during that school year, a jump of 8.7% from the previous year. Now ranked 29th, California had fluttered in the low- to mid-30s during the previous five years. New Jersey, New York and Washington, D.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2002 | PETER Y. HONG, MARLA DICKERSON and NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Household incomes fell during the 1990s in much of Southern California, according to Census 2000 data released Tuesday, reversing decades of gains and tarnishing the region's historic image as a place of rising fortunes. Los Angeles County suffered the worst drop in median household income in the state, while median income also fell in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, and was stagnant in Ventura County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the news broke last week that Santa Ana had the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking people in the nation, some residents imagined reactionary murmurs from outside: "They are taking over." But the new Census Bureau survey--in which 74% of the city's residents said they speak Spanish and 15% of those 18 to 64 said they spoke no English--was a stark, connect-the-dots silhouette of a city whose full portrait is far more nuanced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | NITA LELYVELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana has the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking residents in the nation, with about 15% of those 18 to 64 speaking no English--nearly four times the California average, according to Census Bureau estimates released today. Spanish is so much a part of life in Santa Ana that 74% of the city's residents speak it, according to the government's Supplementary Survey, a detailed 40-question form sent out last year to 700,000 households in 1,203 U.S. counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | NITA LELYVELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana has the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking residents in the nation, with about 15% of those 18 to 64 speaking no English--nearly four times the California average, according to Census Bureau estimates released today. Spanish is so much a part of life in Santa Ana that 74% of the city's residents speak it, according to the government's Supplementary Survey, a detailed 40-question form sent out last year to 700,000 households in 1,203 U.S. counties.
NEWS
November 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
A panel of federal judges Thursday dismissed a lawsuit filed by Utah seeking to wrest a congressional seat from North Carolina. The suit disputed figures in the 2000 census that led to North Carolina getting a 13th seat in Congress. Had the suit been successful, Utah would have been granted a fourth U.S. House seat. The judges voted, 2 to 1, to dismiss the suit. Utah Atty. Gen. Mark Shurtleff said he would appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.
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