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Census 2000

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's ongoing census count deserves accolades, especially for its improved outreach to minorities and immigrants, community leaders and local government officials told a federal watchdog panel Monday. In 1990, the state had the largest population undercount in the nation, and a third of the Californians missed--close to 300,000--lived in the Los Angeles area, said Lt. Gov. Cruz M. Bustamante, the newest member of the U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999 | HANNAH MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to avoid losing $600 million in public funds during the next decade, Los Angeles County officials Wednesday launched a multifaceted campaign to ensure that everyone stands to be counted in next year's census. Because the 1990 census undercounted county residents by an estimated 3.8%, federal and state agencies gave the county less than its fair share for such crucial services as health care, education and housing, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2002 | Robin Fields, Times Staff Writer
Census 2000 failed to count 509,012 Californians, more than half of them in the Southland, according to a set of much-debated, statistically revised figures released Friday by the U.S. Census Bureau. Almost 300,000 of those overlooked were Latino, the agency said. More than 25% were children.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's declining growth rate during the past decade may net it only a single new seat in the House of Representatives when Census 2000 numbers are sent to President Clinton at the end of the year, the smallest gain for the state in a century, a Los Angeles Times analysis of population estimates shows. The recession helped slow the Golden State's population growth in the 1990s to 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1999 | ELEANOR YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing at the front of the classroom, Nhi Ho smiled continuously as he used his native tongue to speak to the recent Vietnamese immigrants studying English. "I'm one of you," Ho said, looking out at the group as they painted Easter eggs as part of a culture lesson. "You can trust me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve hours of steady rain have turned the intersection of 8th and Soto streets into a sloppy soup of urban grime. It's rush hour in Boyle Heights and most drivers don't notice the traffic on foot--the homeless crossing from corner to corner, hustling change, scoring drugs, stepping into a fast food restaurant. But homeless outreach worker Amanda Sosa sees them Thursday night and offers a sandwich, maybe a personal hygiene kit, and a pitch: "Could you answer some questions on this survey?"
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The government Thursday released the first official census 2000 figures, showing a rapid growth of Latino and Asian populations--even in areas of the Deep South and Midwest. The Latino population in Wisconsin, for example, grew by 107% during the 1990s, to 192,921. In Mississippi, the Asian population grew by at least 50% and as much as 84%--a range that takes into account a new option that allowed people to check off more than one racial category for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2002 | PETER Y. HONG, MARLA DICKERSON and NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Household incomes fell during the 1990s in much of Southern California, according to Census 2000 data released Tuesday, reversing decades of gains and tarnishing the region's historic image as a place of rising fortunes. Los Angeles County suffered the worst drop in median household income in the state, while median income also fell in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, and was stagnant in Ventura County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As new census 2000 figures confirm Ventura County's increased racial diversity, a variety of data show the county also grew richer during the past decade. During the 1990s, upscale Ventura County lured tens of thousands of urban professionals from the Los Angeles Basin, hundreds of high-tech immigrants from Asia and thousands of immigrants from Mexico, state and federal figures show.
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