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Census 2000

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the news broke last week that Santa Ana had the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking people in the nation, some residents imagined reactionary murmurs from outside: "They are taking over." But the new Census Bureau survey--in which 74% of the city's residents said they speak Spanish and 15% of those 18 to 64 said they spoke no English--was a stark, connect-the-dots silhouette of a city whose full portrait is far more nuanced.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | NITA LELYVELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana has the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking residents in the nation, with about 15% of those 18 to 64 speaking no English--nearly four times the California average, according to Census Bureau estimates released today. Spanish is so much a part of life in Santa Ana that 74% of the city's residents speak it, according to the government's Supplementary Survey, a detailed 40-question form sent out last year to 700,000 households in 1,203 U.S. counties.
NEWS
November 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
A panel of federal judges Thursday dismissed a lawsuit filed by Utah seeking to wrest a congressional seat from North Carolina. The suit disputed figures in the 2000 census that led to North Carolina getting a 13th seat in Congress. Had the suit been successful, Utah would have been granted a fourth U.S. House seat. The judges voted, 2 to 1, to dismiss the suit. Utah Atty. Gen. Mark Shurtleff said he would appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
October 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
The number of illegal immigrants in the United States has risen to at least 7 million and possibly as high as 8 million, according to new figures from the 2000 census that offer a significantly larger count than previous estimates. The new number shows that the nation's total number of undocumented immigrants has at least doubled since 1990, as millions of people--mainly from Mexico and Central America--arrived to fill jobs in a booming economy.
NEWS
October 18, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Census Bureau officials said Wednesday that they will not statistically adjust the 2000 census numbers and instead will proceed with plans to use the door-to-door head count to distribute billions of dollars in federal funds. They said they could not improve on that basic count by adjusting the numbers, as they had hoped, because a quality-check survey they conducted was flawed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gay male couples are overwhelmingly city folk, while lesbian partners are more apt to settle in suburbs or foothill towns, census 2000 information for Southern California shows. To some extent, the pattern confirms long-held stereotypes about disparate gay and lesbian subcultures. But the map is also shot through with more universal truths about how the financial gender gap and parenthood affect everyone's choice of neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite aggressive outreach by community groups and cities, about 20 neighborhoods in Los Angeles County, from Van Nuys to South-Central to Long Beach, had paltry rates of participation in the 2000 census. While 67% of all Americans returned census forms last year, 46 Los Angeles County tracts had response rates of 50% or less. About half of those tracts also had low response rates in the 1990 census. The city of Los Angeles, which contains 35 of those weak-response tracts, spent $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly released 2000 census data depict several of California's largest Latino groups as shrinking in the 1990s, an unexpected, improbable result that has community agencies complaining and demographers concerned. Some experts attribute it to a simple change in the census form. Others believe it is a consequence of an evolving pan-Latino consciousness that discourages people from retaining strong national identities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California is a land of economic extremes, with more than its share of big earners and poor people. But, according to Census Bureau figures being released today, it's also short of something: middle-class families. The latest figures portray California as among the nation's leaders in families earning more than $200,000 a year and, at the same time, a place with above-average percentages of impoverished children. That left the state with a pinched middle class at the end of the decade.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
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