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Census 2000

NEWS
October 18, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Census Bureau officials said Wednesday that they will not statistically adjust the 2000 census numbers and instead will proceed with plans to use the door-to-door head count to distribute billions of dollars in federal funds. They said they could not improve on that basic count by adjusting the numbers, as they had hoped, because a quality-check survey they conducted was flawed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gay male couples are overwhelmingly city folk, while lesbian partners are more apt to settle in suburbs or foothill towns, census 2000 information for Southern California shows. To some extent, the pattern confirms long-held stereotypes about disparate gay and lesbian subcultures. But the map is also shot through with more universal truths about how the financial gender gap and parenthood affect everyone's choice of neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite aggressive outreach by community groups and cities, about 20 neighborhoods in Los Angeles County, from Van Nuys to South-Central to Long Beach, had paltry rates of participation in the 2000 census. While 67% of all Americans returned census forms last year, 46 Los Angeles County tracts had response rates of 50% or less. About half of those tracts also had low response rates in the 1990 census. The city of Los Angeles, which contains 35 of those weak-response tracts, spent $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly released 2000 census data depict several of California's largest Latino groups as shrinking in the 1990s, an unexpected, improbable result that has community agencies complaining and demographers concerned. Some experts attribute it to a simple change in the census form. Others believe it is a consequence of an evolving pan-Latino consciousness that discourages people from retaining strong national identities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California is a land of economic extremes, with more than its share of big earners and poor people. But, according to Census Bureau figures being released today, it's also short of something: middle-class families. The latest figures portray California as among the nation's leaders in families earning more than $200,000 a year and, at the same time, a place with above-average percentages of impoverished children. That left the state with a pinched middle class at the end of the decade.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
With shouts of "Arriba!" whistles and thunderous applause, Los Angeles mayoral candidate Antonio Villaraigosa was greeted like a conquering hero at a gathering of Latino officials this week. Though Villaraigosa lost the race, Latino officials, buoyed by census data showing their growing numbers, believe that victory--greater political power--is inevitable. Census findings show that there were 35.3 million Latinos in the United States in 2000, or about 12.5% of the population.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 10 years of waiting for new census data and three months of analyzing it, the nation's demographics experts are sharply divided on whether segregation of blacks eased in the 1990s. Three main factions have emerged, offering up the same numbers as proof that (1) integration reached historic levels, (2) integration stalled or (3) what looks like new integration is a temporary mirage. On their debate turns a fundamental notion of American progress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2001 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They come for the contagious gospel choir, the rollicking sermons and preacher's booming voice, rippling over the pews. At Santa Ana's Second Baptist Church, parishioners also come for the comfortable haven created by the faces that surround them--African American faces. "There is something uniquely special," said the Rev. John McReynolds, "about being with my people on a Sunday in worship."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY and DANIEL YI and HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California cities are among the most crowded in the nation, as high housing prices and a chronic apartment shortage have forced families to double up and homeowners to rent bedrooms and garages. Crowding detailed in the latest U.S. census can be seen especially in largely Latino cities that have become major ports of entry for poor immigrants seeking a better life.
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