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Census 2000

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2002 | PETER Y. HONG, MARLA DICKERSON and NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Household incomes fell during the 1990s in much of Southern California, according to Census 2000 data released Tuesday, reversing decades of gains and tarnishing the region's historic image as a place of rising fortunes. Los Angeles County suffered the worst drop in median household income in the state, while median income also fell in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, and was stagnant in Ventura County.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2002
Some statistical nuggets about the city of Los Angeles from the first release of Census 2000 long form data Tuesday: * The Latino population rose 23.5% from 1990 and the Asian/Pacific Islander population rose 15.2%. At the same time, the number of whites fell 15.4% and the black population fell 11.5%. * Rental units make up 61.4% of the city's housing stock. * The number of children under primary school age rose 153.8% to 125,802.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE and RAY F. HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A decade of immigration and dwindling middle-class jobs shredded the divide separating Orange County--once the epitome of white middle-class suburbia--from Los Angeles County, its urban, multiethnic neighbor to the north, newly released census figures show. During the '90s, Orange County underwent a shift in economics, language and education, with increases in the number of wealthy, educated citizens and in the ranks of poor, low-educated immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2002 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of people of Central American ancestry residing in the Greater Los Angeles area is almost 50% greater than reported in Census 2000, according to an analysis of census data to be released today. The study by the Pew Hispanic Center, a Latino think tank, found that residents in the region with Central America origins approached 645,000, with Salvadorans as the largest group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the news broke last week that Santa Ana had the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking people in the nation, some residents imagined reactionary murmurs from outside: "They are taking over." But the new Census Bureau survey--in which 74% of the city's residents said they speak Spanish and 15% of those 18 to 64 said they spoke no English--was a stark, connect-the-dots silhouette of a city whose full portrait is far more nuanced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | NITA LELYVELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana has the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking residents in the nation, with about 15% of those 18 to 64 speaking no English--nearly four times the California average, according to Census Bureau estimates released today. Spanish is so much a part of life in Santa Ana that 74% of the city's residents speak it, according to the government's Supplementary Survey, a detailed 40-question form sent out last year to 700,000 households in 1,203 U.S. counties.
NEWS
November 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
A panel of federal judges Thursday dismissed a lawsuit filed by Utah seeking to wrest a congressional seat from North Carolina. The suit disputed figures in the 2000 census that led to North Carolina getting a 13th seat in Congress. Had the suit been successful, Utah would have been granted a fourth U.S. House seat. The judges voted, 2 to 1, to dismiss the suit. Utah Atty. Gen. Mark Shurtleff said he would appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
October 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
The number of illegal immigrants in the United States has risen to at least 7 million and possibly as high as 8 million, according to new figures from the 2000 census that offer a significantly larger count than previous estimates. The new number shows that the nation's total number of undocumented immigrants has at least doubled since 1990, as millions of people--mainly from Mexico and Central America--arrived to fill jobs in a booming economy.
NEWS
October 18, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Census Bureau officials said Wednesday that they will not statistically adjust the 2000 census numbers and instead will proceed with plans to use the door-to-door head count to distribute billions of dollars in federal funds. They said they could not improve on that basic count by adjusting the numbers, as they had hoped, because a quality-check survey they conducted was flawed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO and SANDRA POINDEXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Latinos, now the largest group in Los Angeles County, have imprinted neighborhoods in different ways with their rapid ascension. Two census tracts, both neighborhoods in transition, offer a glimpse. In Tract 9107.06 in Palmdale, Dick Gray is optimistic as he watches his neighborhood reclaim itself like a rose in the desert. Fifty miles south in Tract 5703.
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