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BUSINESS
July 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
File this one under the Celebrities Under Fire column: Shaquille O'Neal, the retired NBA player, recently announced he was launching a line of low-calorie sodas with Arizona Beverages called Soda Shaq Cream Soda.  But like other celebrities who hawk sodas, O'Neal has come under fire by some consumer groups for promoting sugar-laden soft drinks.  PHOTOS: The strangest business sponsorships The Center for Science in the...
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NATIONAL
September 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A consumer group and 35 doctors and scientists asked the National Institutes of Health to oversee an independent review of the science that led to new guidelines urging wider use of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. The Center for Science in the Public Interest and the doctors and scientists said in a letter to NIH that there wasn't enough evidence to justify the recommendations, especially for women, older people and diabetics.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Led by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, 37 health and consumer groups petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban the use of seven antibiotics in livestock, saying the practice poses a potential threat to human health. The drugs the groups want banned are penicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, tylosin, lincomycin, virginiamycin and bacitracin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2001
Henry Miller may be right that Americans are "fatsos" ("FDA Fails to Give Olestra Fair Weight," Opinion, Feb. 4). But he is wrong in concluding that eating foods containing the fat substitute Olestra is an important means of preventing obesity and heart disease. Small amounts of Olestra reduce the body's absorption of carotenoids, which may help prevent eye and other diseases. That's why University of Hawaii cancer researcher John Bertram (not the Center for Science in the Public Interest, as Miller charged)
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Starbucks has declared that it will no longer use cochineal extract, an insect-derived red coloring, in its wares. If anyone is imagining that the use of this dye is rare or new, they're mistaken. At a UCLA “economic botany” website we learn, among other things, that cochineal bug, or Dactylopius coccus , if you want to address it formally, is an insect that sucks the sap of prickly pear cactus and was used by the early Mixtec Indians of pre-Hispanic Mexico as a red dye for clothing.
NEWS
August 4, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
It's easy to be the Monday-morning quarterback, but credit the Center for Science in the Public Interest for asking why federal regulators didn't warn consumers sooner about the possibility that turkey from a Cargill plant in Arkansas might be tainted with salmonella. Officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture acknowledged Thursday that they may have had hints that the strain of salmonella that has caused one death and more than 20 hospitalizations was tied with the Arkansas plant.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Don't expect to get a vitamin boost from 7-Up drinks any more. The maker of the beverage, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, agreed to stop adding vitamin E to some of its drinks and halt claims that the product has antioxidants as part of a settlement with a health advocacy group. The company had been infusing small amounts of vitamin E into some varieties of 7-Up -- regular and diet Cherry Antioxidant, Mixed Berry Antioxidant and Pomegranate Antioxidant -- when the firm was sued  in November in U.S. District Court in California on behalf of a Sherman Oaks man. The Center for Science in the Public Interest also took issue with the images of berries and pomegranates on the soda's labels, saying it gave the impression that the antioxidants came from fruit instead of the added vitamin E. “Soda is not a health food, and should not be marketed as a healthy source of antioxidants or other nutrients,” Steve Gardner, litigation director at CSPI, said in a statement.  “It's to the credit of Dr Pepper Snapple Group that it carefully considered these concerns, and worked collaboratively to resolve the dispute without further litigation.  The end result is a big plus for consumers.” Texas-based Dr Pepper Snapple Group did not immediately return calls seeking comment.
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