Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCenter For Science In The Public Interest
IN THE NEWS

Center For Science In The Public Interest

NEWS
April 16, 1985 | Associated Press
The Federal Trade Commission today rejected a request that it ban or limit advertising for alcoholic beverages, saying it could find no basis to conclude that such ads affect alcohol abuse. Acting on the basis of a staff report, the commission voted 4 to 1 to turn down the 1983 petition filed by the private, nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Starbucks has declared that it will no longer use cochineal extract, an insect-derived red coloring, in its wares. If anyone is imagining that the use of this dye is rare or new, they're mistaken. At a UCLA “economic botany” website we learn, among other things, that cochineal bug, or Dactylopius coccus , if you want to address it formally, is an insect that sucks the sap of prickly pear cactus and was used by the early Mixtec Indians of pre-Hispanic Mexico as a red dye for clothing.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
File this one under the Celebrities Under Fire column: Shaquille O'Neal, the retired NBA player, recently announced he was launching a line of low-calorie sodas with Arizona Beverages called Soda Shaq Cream Soda.  But like other celebrities who hawk sodas, O'Neal has come under fire by some consumer groups for promoting sugar-laden soft drinks.  PHOTOS: The strangest business sponsorships The Center for Science in the...
NATIONAL
September 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A consumer group and 35 doctors and scientists asked the National Institutes of Health to oversee an independent review of the science that led to new guidelines urging wider use of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. The Center for Science in the Public Interest and the doctors and scientists said in a letter to NIH that there wasn't enough evidence to justify the recommendations, especially for women, older people and diabetics.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Led by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, 37 health and consumer groups petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban the use of seven antibiotics in livestock, saying the practice poses a potential threat to human health. The drugs the groups want banned are penicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, tylosin, lincomycin, virginiamycin and bacitracin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2001
Henry Miller may be right that Americans are "fatsos" ("FDA Fails to Give Olestra Fair Weight," Opinion, Feb. 4). But he is wrong in concluding that eating foods containing the fat substitute Olestra is an important means of preventing obesity and heart disease. Small amounts of Olestra reduce the body's absorption of carotenoids, which may help prevent eye and other diseases. That's why University of Hawaii cancer researcher John Bertram (not the Center for Science in the Public Interest, as Miller charged)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|