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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Who among us could calculate how many bottles of beer were sold when the movie "Total Recall" featured Miller Lite and Miller Genuine Draft on nine different occasions? Or how many bottles of Coors sold because its advertising sign popped up five times in the same cinematic classic? And how about that one call for Killian Red? Did it stimulate the marketplace and the palate?
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BUSINESS
March 12, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The influence that advertisers wield over stories appearing in newspapers, magazines and on broadcast stations has increased during the recession, according to a study released Wednesday by a public interest group. The 62-page study documents dozens of examples--almost half anonymous--of how fear of riling advertisers has allegedly pressured some news organizations to revise or kill stories.
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BUSINESS
May 28, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
About a year ago--when the advertising industry in Los Angeles was beginning to free fall--Rob Frankel had five employees, a fat lease expiring on his Van Nuys office space and a baseball-size knot in his stomach. Today, working out of his Encino home, Frankel's only paid employee is himself. And the knot in his stomach is gone. "You have no idea what kind of waste goes on at an agency," said Frankel, whose unpaid associates at Frankel & Anderson are two collies and a German shepherd.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Who among us could calculate how many bottles of beer were sold when the movie "Total Recall" featured Miller Lite and Miller Genuine Draft on nine different occasions? Or how many bottles of Coors sold because its advertising sign popped up five times in the same cinematic classic? And how about that one call for Killian Red? Did it stimulate the marketplace and the palate?
BUSINESS
March 12, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The influence that advertisers wield over stories appearing in newspapers, magazines and on broadcast stations has increased during the recession, according to a study released Wednesday by a public interest group. The 62-page study documents dozens of examples--almost half anonymous--of how fear of riling advertisers has allegedly pressured some news organizations to revise or kill stories.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | GARY LIBMAN
Step-by-step advice on using the Telephone Consumer Protection Act is available for $3 from the Center for the Study of Commercialism, 1875 Connecticut Ave. N.W., Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20009. To find out about Private Citizen's list of consumers who don't wish to be called by telemarketers, call (800) CUT-JUNK. To become part of the Telephone Preference Service of the Direct Marketing Assn., write to the association at P.O. Box 9014, Farmingdale, N.Y. 11735.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1993 | Associated Press
Michael Jacobson didn't get angry at the telemarketers that interrupted him at home. He got even. The consumer advocate may be the first person in the nation to successfully sue a corporation under the federal Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991. His target was Citibank Corp., which settled the case for $750. Jacobson, head of the Center for the Study of Commercialism, told companies that called, "Please never call me again." The law says telemarketers must obey that command.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The folks who helped turn New York's Times Square into a neon jungle suddenly have their hands at the switch in Los Angeles. Van Wagner Communications Inc., the New York firm responsible for most of the pulsating neon signs in Times Square--including a $1-million Coke bottle--Thursday acquired half of the Los Angeles outdoor ad firm Martin Communications. Van Wagner Chief Executive Richard Schaps said he has big plans to light up Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
About a year ago--when the advertising industry in Los Angeles was beginning to free fall--Rob Frankel had five employees, a fat lease expiring on his Van Nuys office space and a baseball-size knot in his stomach. Today, working out of his Encino home, Frankel's only paid employee is himself. And the knot in his stomach is gone. "You have no idea what kind of waste goes on at an agency," said Frankel, whose unpaid associates at Frankel & Anderson are two collies and a German shepherd.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1993 | Associated Press
An orbiting billboard that would beam a moon-sized message back to Earthly consumers is either a breakthrough in commercial funding for space or an abomination, depending on whether you listen to NASA or Carl Sagan. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has no connection to the project, which could be launched in 1996, but NASA's Charles Redmond said the so-called space billboard is in line with the agency's aims.
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