Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCenters For Disease Control
IN THE NEWS

Centers For Disease Control

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Only one state, Alaska, reported outbreaks of influenza for the last week of November and the first week of December, the national Centers for Disease Control said Thursday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Lisa Girion and Scott Glover
Doctors are fueling the nation's prescription drug epidemic and represent the primary source of narcotic painkillers for chronic abusers, according to a new government study. The finding challenges a widely held belief that has long guided policymakers: That the epidemic is caused largely by abusers getting their drugs without prescriptions, typically from friends and family. Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which conducted the study, said the research showed the need for greater focus on doctors who are "problem prescribers.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1989
Grass-roots organizations in Los Angeles, Anaheim and San Diego that have or want AIDS prevention programs will receive a portion of $9.7 million in federal grants that will be awarded nationwide this year by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. The grant program, in its second year, is part of the Centers for Disease Control's efforts to stem the spread of the AIDS virus by changing high-risk behavior of targeted groups, such as homosexuals and intravenous drug users.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan
One week after 20-year-old Adam Lanza used guns to kill 20 first-graders and seven adults before shooting himself, two physicians published a Viewpoint article in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. asking what the medical and public health community can do to prevent massacres like the one at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., from being repeated. “What actions can the nation take to prevent more such acts from happening, or at least limit their severity?” they wrote.
NEWS
June 21, 1985 | United Press International
The federal Centers for Disease Control said Thursday that a study had found that more than 285,000 Americans committed suicide from 1970 to 1980, making it the nation's 10th leading cause of death for the period.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Dietary supplements containing a dangerous solvent have killed one person and hospitalized dozens since October, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said. The products contain gamma-butyrolactone, which is metabolized by the body into gamma-hydroxybutyrate, a potent unapproved drug sometimes called the "date-rape drug," CDC officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1991
Will the impact of Earvin Johnson's admission that he too is infected by the HIV virus be felt in the appropriations committee of Congress? It is imperative that more funding find its way to the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and the National Science Foundation so that research can progress in finding ways of preventing, treating and curing this deadly AIDS disease. CATHERINE M. BLAGG Tujunga
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta announced a program to help doctors hear about outbreaks of potentially fatal respiratory viruses sooner. The CDC will use a telephone monitoring system to track cases of respiratory syncytial (RSV) and parainfluenza viruses--which cause a variety of often serious respiratory ailments, especially in young children. Previously, health officials had alerted the CDC of outbreaks by weekly postcards.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Federal health officials with the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control began distributing a 15-minute videotape advising people infected with the AIDS virus to be especially careful about the foods they eat and how they prepare those foods. Because their immune systems are weakened, people with AIDS and earlier stages of the disease face dangers from food-borne illnesses that can result from improperly cooked and handled foods, the videotape says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1997
In response to Sonia Nazario's comprehensive series on youth suicide (March 9, 10), I would like to add two points. First, the major target of school-based prevention programs should be peers in whom troubled youth often confide. The focus is more on help-seeking than on suicide per se. Second, after an extensive review of these programs in 1992, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concluded, "There is no evidence for increased suicidal ideation or behavior following these programs" ("Youth Suicide Prevention Programs: A Resource Guide," CDC, 1992)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
The number of baby boomers dying from a "silent epidemic" of hepatitis C infections is increasing so rapidly that federal officials are planning a new nationwide push for widespread testing. Three in four of the estimated 3.2 million people who have chronic hepatitis C - and a similar proportion of those who die from the disease - are baby boomers. Deaths from the virus nearly doubled between 1999 and 2007 to more than 15,000, according to a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2012 | David Lazarus
Janelle Ricci hasn't been sleeping well. It's been more than a year, in fact, since she's had a decent night's sleep. Ricci, 21, a design student at Burbank's Woodbury University, says pressure to perform can keep her up for days at a time. Her longest stretch, she told me, was staying up for about 64 hours straight during one particularly stressful period. "It really affects my life," Ricci said. "I've started falling asleep at work. I sleep through my classes. " She's not alone.
HEALTH
July 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Increased screening during the last decade for colorectal cancer, the nation's second-leading cause of cancer deaths, has put a sharp dent in the prevalence of the disease and in the number of deaths resulting from it, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. As screening for the disease among those ages 50 to 75 increased from half to two-thirds of that population, the prevalence rate fell from 52.3 cases per 100,000 in 2003 to 45.4 per 100,000 in 2007. The death rate fell from 19 per 100,000 to 16.7 per 100,000 during the same period, the agency reported in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report . Those declines represent 66,000 fewer cancers during the period and 32,000 fewer deaths, the agency found.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2011 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the agency whose task includes preventing pandemics and pushing flu shots, is preparing for a zombie apocalypse. In a Monday blog post , the normally staid agency issued a straight-faced list of recommendations on how to survive a massive invasion of the flesh-eating undead. "In such a scenario zombies would take over entire countries, roaming city streets eating anything living that got in their way," the post said. "So what do you need to do before zombies ... or hurricanes or pandemics, for example, actually happen?"
OPINION
February 22, 2011
We now know where the couch potatoes lurk in this country, thanks to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that tracks our physical activity down to the county level. California, with a climate that invites every sport from surfing to snowboarding, is among the more physically active states, but the CDC's map shows that exercise is about more than the weather. Minnesotans are more likely to get a move on than we are. Yet practically all of Mississippi is depicted in dark blue on the map, meaning that close to a third or more residents get no leisure-time exercise.
NEWS
February 13, 2010 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An estimated 57 million Americans have contracted pandemic H1N1 influenza since the outbreak began last April, about 257,000 have been hospitalized with complications from it, and nearly 12,000 have died, according to estimates released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The total number of infected represents an increase of about 7 million cases since the last estimate was released in December, a modest gain that correlates with other data suggesting the swine flu pandemic has been waning.
SCIENCE
August 23, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The number of measles cases in the United States is at its highest level since 1997, and nearly half the cases involve children whose parents did not get them vaccinated, government health officials reported Thursday. The number of cases so far this year is still small, just 131. But that compares with 42 cases for all of last year. As of July 30, the country had seen seven outbreaks, including one in Illinois with 30 cases, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | Associated Press
The federal Centers for Disease Control misspent $6.6 million while conducting a disputed study of the effects of Agent Orange, a congressional study released Saturday said. The General Accounting Office said the money was spent on work by outside contractors that was not needed or couldn't be done because the CDC did not have a methodology ready to begin the work. Agent Orange was a herbicide sprayed by U.S. troops during the Vietnam War to remove jungle cover.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
An estimated 57 million Americans have contracted pandemic H1N1 influenza since the outbreak began last April, about 257,000 have been hospitalized with complications from it, and nearly 12,000 have died, according to estimates released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The total number of infected represents an increase of about 7 million cases since the last estimate was released in December, a modest gain that correlates with other data suggesting the swine flu pandemic has been waning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2009 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The fellow passenger with the hacking cough -- making no effort to cover his mouth -- is among an air traveler's biggest gripes, right up there with the screaming baby and the toddler who won't stop kicking the seat. Amid concern about H1N1 and seasonal flu, federal health officials issued guidelines late last month on how to handle obviously sick passengers: Flight attendants should ask the person with the cough to wear a mask and move them at least 6 feet from others. In the air, recent travelers report a different reality.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|