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January 1, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Rosa Maria Mendoza, 1995 was a year of struggle. For the first eight months, she struggled to meet her quota, sewing 400 dozen buttons a day on MacGregor shirts at the Formosa Textiles factory in a gritty industrial park east of San Salvador. She struggled to survive on a $90 monthly wage, paying a baby sitter to care for her three children and walking half an hour to work every day because she could not afford bus fare.
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NEWS
January 1, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Rosa Maria Mendoza, 1995 was a year of struggle. For the first eight months, she struggled to meet her quota, sewing 400 dozen buttons a day on MacGregor shirts at the Formosa Textiles factory in a gritty industrial park east of San Salvador. She struggled to survive on a $90 monthly wage, paying a baby sitter to care for her three children and walking half an hour to work every day because she could not afford bus fare.
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NEWS
September 28, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advertisement in a U.S. magazine shows a Salvadoran woman in a bright print dress bent over an industrial sewing machine. "Rosa Martinez produces apparel for U.S. markets on her sewing machine in El Salvador," the ad promises the readers of Bobbin, a textile industry trade journal. "You can hire her for 33 cents an hour."
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advertisement in a U.S. magazine shows a Salvadoran woman in a bright print dress bent over an industrial sewing machine. "Rosa Martinez produces apparel for U.S. markets on her sewing machine in El Salvador," the ad promises the readers of Bobbin, a textile industry trade journal. "You can hire her for 33 cents an hour."
OPINION
May 25, 2005
Re "Room at the Top," editorial, May 16: The AFL-CIO's objections to the Central American Free Trade Agreement are based not on fear of poor countries but rather on the flawed content of the agreement, as well as on our work with Central American unions, farmers, environmentalists and people of faith -- many of whom share our view that CAFTA is the wrong way to integrate our economies and societies. You misrepresented the International Labor Organization's findings on Central America's labor laws and the contents of the free-trade agreement with Jordan.
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