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Central American Refugee Center

NEWS
January 10, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
Activists working with Salvadoran refugees in the Pico-Union area are planning a new wave of and a letter-writing campaign to protest the Salvadoran government's failure to implement provisions of the Dec. 15 peace accords.
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NEWS
December 6, 1992 | JAKE DOHERTY
Reps. Maxine Waters and Julian Dixon joined community leaders last week in recognizing the efforts of the AFL-CIO in helping local families and community organizations since the April-May riots. In a ceremony at the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor AFL-CIO office at 2130 W. 9th St., Waters (D-Los Angeles) presented the federation with a congressional resolution praising its efforts. The federation represents more than 700,000 union members.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
Offering works by Fidel Castro, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Malcolm X and Nelson Mandela, the Pathfinder bookstore for 10 years has been a meeting place for the political left from throughout the city. Although most of the store's activity has been geared toward leftist intellectuals, it has begun to focus on the plight of the unemployed and homeless in the Mid-City area. "I like the bookstore for its symbolic value and as a resource to the community," said Jaime Coyle of the Pico-Union area.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Warning of possible fraud in El Salvador's presidential election, the Central American Refugee Center (CARECEN) is calling for increased support from the U.S. and Salvadoran governments to ensure increased voter registration. Efforts include opening the door for 1 million Salvadorans living in the United States to take part in the March election.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immigrant rights groups in Los Angeles and across the country are gearing up for a new law that will make hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans eligible for temporary safe haven. Under a landmark immigration bill passed by Congress in October, Salvadorans who are in the United States illegally and who have not been able to qualify for hard-to-get political asylum will, for the first time, be able to gain temporary legal status and avoid deportation.
NEWS
May 26, 1993 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As jubilant representatives of Los Angeles' Salvadoran community praised the Clinton Administration on Tuesday for extending a refuge program, other local Central American advocacy groups intensified their efforts to get the same protection for Guatemalans in the United States. The push on behalf of Guatemalan immigrants came in the wake of the suspension of that country's constitution, the dissolution of its Congress and fears of a coup by the nation's powerful military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As hundreds of applicants waited in line outside a new downtown hotel for job interviews Wednesday, about 25 union demonstrators demanded that management immediately allow employees to vote on whether to unionize. The protesters from Local 11 of the Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union, joined by representatives from several community organizations, demonstrated in front of the Inter-Continental Hotel in Bunker Hill's California Plaza.
NEWS
June 5, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service was instructed by a Los Angeles federal judge Tuesday to promptly inform attorneys or relatives of the location of any illegal aliens transferred from an El Centro detention camp after a hunger strike last week. U.S. District Judge David V.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1991
Kenneth Freed's article "El Salvador's Painful Prosperity" (Sept. 1) presents an incomplete picture of the current climate there. While admitting that the Salvadoran government's neo-liberal, free-market policies are hurting the poor, the major thrust of the article suggests that El Salvador is on a forward-looking economic trend. While giving statistics of "real economic growth," the article fails to mention that the economic policies are highly unpopular. After a recent closure of a government institute that regulates the price of basic goods, tens of thousands marched in the streets of San Salvador protesting the privatizations of the economy.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: Three hundred or so people ambling around in the Daniel Saxon Gallery on a hot November Saturday night. The artworks lining the walls--by obscure artists as well as art stars such as Laddie John Dill, Leon Golub, the late Carlos Almaraz and D. J. Hall--were auctioned off Saturday for Carecen, the Central American Refugee Center, a grass-roots nonprofit organization that provides legal and social services for about half a million refugees from El Salvador and Guatemala in L. A.
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