Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCentral Asia
IN THE NEWS

Central Asia

NEWS
January 11, 1998 | DAVE CARPENTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stealing up on the abandoned building from behind, the narcotics police burst in on a grubby opium den. Two men are slumped glassy-eyed against the wall on makeshift mattresses. As usual, the dealers who supply them are nowhere to be found. "We could put these small-time guys in jail for a year or two, but what good would it do?" says one officer, Akbar Alimzhanov, who lets the men off after a stern chat. Opium addiction is spreading rapidly in Osh, the heart of a drug boom in Central Asia.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 7, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In the war against terrorism, the United States will become involved in economic development in Central Asia and in building closer economic ties with Russia, marking a new chapter for the world economy. Russia's quick support for U.S. policies and military needs in the wake of Sept. 11 has "defined" a new relationship between the two nations, Condoleezza Rice, national security advisor to President Bush, told a Washington meeting of the U.S.-Russia Business Council last week.
OPINION
May 12, 1991 | Thomas Glotz, Thomas Glotz, formerly a journalist based in Turkey, is now in Central Asia as a Crane-Rogers fellow of the Institute of Currant World Affairs
Even as the Baltic States and the Ukraine demand independence from the Soviet Union, there exists a deep ambivalence--and confusion--among the population of Central Asia about what continued association with Moscow might mean. For years, the "stans," the five mainly Muslim republics of Central Asia--Kazakistan, Uzbekistan, Kirgizia, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan--have been the most docile of the 15 republics that make up the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1992
Turkmenistan. Tajikistan. Uzbekistan. Even a few months ago these remote provinces of the late Soviet empire would have been unlikely to draw the personal attention of the American secretary of state. This coming week, however, James A.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | From Reuters
The leaders of Tajikistan told the world Tuesday that the departure of President Rakhman Nabiyev would not hurt democracy in the poor and volatile former Soviet republic. "The Parliament and government of the republic of Tajikistan state with full responsibility that the voluntary resignation of the president . . . in no way signifies that we will turn away from the path of creating a democratic, secular state," an official statement said.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | VLADIMIR KLIMENKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Forming a Revolutionary Council, a coalition of democrats and Muslim activists declared Thursday that power in this Central Asian republic has passed into their hands, and supporters by the thousands shouted, "God is great!" The whereabouts of Rakhman Nabiyev, a former Communist hard-liner elected president last fall, were unknown.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
A day of mourning was declared Monday in the Central Asian republic of Kirghizia, where the death toll after a week of ethnic clashes rose to 116, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported. Tass said the situation in the Soviet republic was quieter after a week of bloody clashes between Uzbeks and Kirghiz in a land dispute. "A trend toward the stabilization of the situation in the republic's southern region has become apparent," Tass said, quoting Kirghizia's Interior Ministry.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With President Islam Karimov leading the way, Secretary of State James A. Baker III whipped through the capital of Tamerlane's 14th-Century empire Sunday after an opposition leader bluntly told him that modern Uzbekistan remains a totalitarian regime despite the collapse of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's political turbulence spread into the heart of Muslim Central Asia on Saturday as the republics of Uzbekistan and Kirghizia declared independence and the president of neighboring Tadzhikistan was swept from office. The two Central Asian defections from the crumbling Soviet empire brought to 10 the number of republics that have formally sought to break away in an accelerated exodus brought on by the attempted coup two weeks ago by reactionary elements of the Kremlin.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tajiks opposing their republic's hard-line ex-Communist leader took control of his residence and most of their capital Wednesday after a violence-marred night in which the chief of the presidential guard dramatically defected to their side. Rakhman Nabiyev, Tajikistan's president, was nowhere to be found in the presidential palace, and his foes said he was holed up in the Parliament building, protected by hundreds of supporters with automatic weapons.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|