Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCentral California
IN THE NEWS

Central California

BUSINESS
December 21, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Technology investor Tim Draper is trying to drum up support to split California into six states, one of them being Silicon Valley. His argument for redrawing the California map: The state is underrepresented in Washington. He's looking to get an initiative on the California ballot. He told TechCrunch: “It is about time California was properly represented with senators in Washington. Now our number of senators per person will be about average.” California has a long history of secessionist fervor.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
STEVINSON, Calif. -  A leggy bridesmaid smoothed her Grecian-pleated dress and stuffed lipstick and two cigars into her cowboy boots.  Over by the horses, the best man slipped a flask out of his vest and offered a mare a sip. The preacher was late, but everything else was on schedule for the sunset wedding at the Double T. The cows had been herded from the pasture to make room for cars, and the barn was hung with white lights and Mason jars....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | Fox 40 Sacramento
Six people are dead after a multicar crash in Central California, including a pregnant woman and her unborn child and three school-age siblings, authorities said. The crash occurred at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in Lodi, about 15 miles north of Stockton. Five cars collided near Ham Lane and Vine Street. Five people died Tuesday evening; the sixth died overnight. At least a dozen other victims, including children, were treated either at the scene or area hospitals. Witnesses said that a sport utility vehicle was speeding at nearly 90 mph just before the crash.  The investigation of the crash was continuing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Jason Wells
A Central California man who chained a pit bull to a street sign and starved it to within days of death faces up to six years in state prison after he was convicted Tuesday of animal cruelty. Prosecutors said that 44-year-old  Valentino Torres also forced the pit bull to drink from a mud puddle. The dog would have died had an animal control officer not come across the emaciated canine in September 2009, the Fresno Bee reported. The officer found the dog tied to a street sign in central Madera and covered in sores, its bones clearly visible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - State prisoners said Wednesday evening that corrections officials are threatening to search their cells, seize their food stashes and possibly move them to solitary confinement if they continue their meal strike. Leaders of the protest said, through outside advocates, that they were prepared for such a crackdown, which would mirror actions taken in past hunger strikes. Deborah Hoffman, the lead spokeswoman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, declined to confirm the measures described by inmates but said they “might be part of our normal policy.” “There is a process in place when an inmate misses his ninth consecutive meal - and it is a process - it doesn't all happen at once, can take days,” Hoffman said in an email.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Tony Perry
A soldier from the city of Greenfield in Monterey County has been killed in Afghanistan, the Defense Department announced. Spec. Javier Sanchez Jr., 28, died Sunday of wounds suffered when his unit was attacked by an improvised explosive device while on patrol in Sar Rowzah, the Pentagon said. Sanchez was assigned to the Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, from Fort Drum, N.Y. Sanchez enlisted in 2006 and deployed to Iraq in 2008-2009. ALSO: California's war dead: Military deaths 2001-present Two LAPD detectives survive ambush, help in search for shooter  Autopsy reports released on suspected Christopher Dorner victims tony.perry@latimes.com
SCIENCE
June 20, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The tricolored blackbird was once among the most common birds in California, with vast colonies of the colorful and highly gregarious species nesting and foraging year-round in marshes and rangelands. Scientists have been worried about a decline in tricolored blackbirds for years now, and the latest statewide surveys show that things are worse than they thought. The entire population dropped from an estimated 400,000 birds in 2008 to roughly 258,000 in 2011. “The next statewide survey will be conducted in 2014, and the results will be alarming,” said Robert Meese, staff research associate at UC Davis' department of environmental science and policy.
SCIENCE
June 14, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
An estimated 65,000 rare, tricolored blackbirds - roughly one-fifth of the species' entire global population - were saved this year when six Central California dairy farmers were paid to delay harvesting their silage crops through the nesting season. With help from Audubon California and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Tulare and Kern County farmers were paid about $393 per acre for the resulting disruptions to their labor schedules and drop in the quality of grain.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2013 | By Shan Li
The chief executive of oil giant Chevron Corp. says that oil and gas producers must regulate themselves more tightly over hydraulic fracturing to address "legitimate concerns" that the practice is unsafe and harmful to the environment. At an event for the Center for Strategic and International Studies, John Watson said the energy industry must work harder to police itself as the public learns more about so-called fracking, the controversial technique that involves injecting large volumes of chemically laced water and sand deep into the ground to release oil or gas. "There are some risks out there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
It's a mystery of the sea: How many great white sharks are prowling near California's surf lines? Some scientists say the population is large and healthy. Others say it is alarmingly small. No one has ever known for certain, but the question has become crucial this year. State and federal authorities are weighing a request to classify the fish scientists know as Carcharodon carcharias as an endangered species worth preserving at all costs, a step that could, among other things, wipe out what's left of a gill net fishing industry that inadvertently snares great whites.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|