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NATIONAL
June 1, 2007 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
A Senate committee that has passed a bill to set funding levels for U.S. spy agencies suggests that the CIA's secret overseas prisons should be shut down unless the Bush administration can demonstrate that they are "necessary, lawful and in the best interests of the United States."
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WORLD
May 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A German citizen who said the CIA kidnapped him and tortured him in an Afghan prison has been detained on suspicion of arson and sent to a hospital psychiatric ward, police said. Khaled Masri, 43, set fire to the entrance of a wholesale market in the southern German town of Neu-Ulm, police said. The damage was estimated at $680,000. Masri's lawyer, Manfred Gnjidic, said his client had "a complete nervous breakdown." "Torture victims have to be in therapy," Gnjidic said.
WORLD
April 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A top Italian court said it would review the indictment of 26 Americans, mostly suspected CIA operatives, in a move that could delay any trial connected to the 2003 kidnapping of a Muslim cleric. The Americans are accused of kidnapping. Italy's government appealed to the Constitutional Court last month in a bid to avoid the first criminal trial stemming from the CIA's "extraordinary renditions." The court noted that the Italian government cited concerns over state secrets.
WORLD
March 26, 2007 | From Reuters
Colombia on Sunday rejected a Los Angeles Times report that the CIA had intelligence alleging that the country's army chief collaborated with right-wing militias accused of atrocities, drug trafficking and massacres. The report, published Sunday, cited a CIA document about Colombia's army commander, Gen. Mario Montoya, and a paramilitary group jointly planning and conducting an operation in 2002 to wipe out Marxist guerrillas from poor areas around Medellin.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2007 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
With a phalanx of cameras awaiting her entrance, Valerie Plame stepped out of the spy-world shadows and into the spotlight. For nearly four years, Plame had been a silent, Garbo-like figure at the center of one of Washington's most consuming scandals. Her unmasking as a covert CIA officer became a case study of the brutal politics of the Iraq war, and launched a criminal probe that led to the conviction of a top White House official. On Friday, Plame finally offered her inside account.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2007 | Washington Post
She has been silent for nearly four years. Today, the former CIA officer whose unmasking fueled a political uproar and criminal probe that reached into the White House is poised to finally tell her own story -- before Congress. Valerie Plame's testimony will have all the trappings of a "Garbo speaks" moment on Capitol Hill, with cameras and microphones arrayed to capture the voice of Plame, the glamorous but mute star of a compelling political intrigue.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Special Prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald, who spent years investigating the 2003 leak of a CIA operative's identity, told lawmakers that he could offer little help during congressional hearings on the leak. Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) asked Fitzgerald last week to meet with members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, which will hold hearings on the Bush administration's handling of CIA operative Valerie Plame's classified employment status.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
The guilty verdicts Tuesday against former vice presidential aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby made him the first high-level White House official convicted of a crime since the Iran-Contra scandal 20 years ago, and marked the latest fallout from the administration's handling of the run-up to the war in Iraq. Libby, former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, was found guilty by a jury on four of five counts of perjury and obstruction of justice and faces a maximum of 25 years in prison.
WORLD
March 5, 2007 | From Reuters
Italy has raised the stakes in its dispute with the United States over the killing in 2005 of an Italian intelligence agent at a U.S. checkpoint in Iraq, saying Washington must set things right by assuming responsibility for the death. Foreign Minister Massimo D'Alema made the demand at a weekend commemoration of Nicola Calipari, the agent killed by a U.S. soldier on March 4, 2005, at a U.S. military checkpoint near Baghdad airport.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The jury weighing the perjury case against I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby began a second week of deliberations Wednesday after sending a note to the judge raising a question about one of the charges against the former vice presidential aide. The note, sent to U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton on Tuesday night, was the first substantive communication from the jurors since they began deliberations last week, and it fueled speculation that they were making progress.
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