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NATIONAL
September 24, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A Columbia University professor who is Sikh was beaten and injured by a pack of men on bicycles near New York City's Central Park over the weekend, raising concerns once again about Sikhs' and Muslims' vulnerability to hate crimes in the United States. Dr. Prabhjot Singh, 31, told reporters Monday that he heard his attackers say, "Get him!" in addition to calling him "Osama" and "terrorist," apparently mistaking him for a Muslim. Sikhism is a separate religion. “I felt somebody grab my beard while on a bike, hit my chin," said Singh, who is an assistant professor of international and public affairs as well as a practicing physician in East Harlem.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
Central Park, one of New York's most beloved landmarks, is a masterpiece of landscape architecture filled with lawns, lakes and woodlands. To make sure visitors get the most out of their exploration, the Central Park Conservancy has launched a series of tours of its 843 acres; tours vary by subject, location and length. The 45-minute welcome tour focuses on the history and design of the park and is a good introduction for first-time visitors. The 90-minute premier tour gives visitors an insider's look at the Conservatory Garden, the landscapes around Belvedere Castle or the Andirondack-style features of the North Woods, among other areas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - They were five men - boys, really - accused of a violent rape. They were prosecuted aggressively by district attorneys and vilified by a tabloid press, then sent to prison for as many as 13 years. In 1989, the case of the Central Park Five, as the attack on a 28-year-old white investment banker in uptown Manhattan has come to be known, roiled the country, touching on race and class and fears about crime. But the defendants - all black or Latino, none older than 16 - didn't commit the attack on the Central Park jogger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
A Glendale resident, along with a Los Angeles resident and a nonprofit group, filed a lawsuit this week asking a federal judge to order the city of Glendale to remove  a controversial statue in a public park that honors women victimized by the Japanese government during World War II. The lawsuit is the latest attempt to remove the 1,100-pound statue for so-called comfort women, which was installed in July, the Glendale News-Press reported ...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By David Ng
Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost" is getting a total musical makeover in the Public Theater's new staging at the Delacorte Theatre in Central Park. With director Alex Timbers and songwriter Michael Friedman on board, this version of the Bard's comedy relocates the action from the kingdom of Navarre to a modern-day resort populated by rowdy college graduates. Timbers and Friedman were the minds behind the musical "Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson," which ran at the Kirk Douglas Theatre before transferring to the Public and later to Broadway.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Six established New York City hotels -- the Iroquois New York, Hotel Chandler, Hotel Belleclaire, the Cosmopolitan, the Gershwin and the Washington Jefferson -- have banded together to form Triumph Hotels. In honor of the new brand, guests who stay at least three nights have their choice of a free neighborhood experience. The deal: It's called the Key to New York City package and features six add-on experiences based on where hotels are located. Guests may go on one of the outings or choose one-way car service between the hotels and any of the city's three airports.
NEWS
January 23, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The artist Christo will drape orange-yellow banners on about 23 miles of pathways in Manhattan's Central Park for two weeks in February 2005, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Wednesday. The project, called "The Gates," will consist of 7,500 gates with hanging saffron-colored cloth and will be financed by Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, the mayor said. The artists said they would donate $3 million to the Central Park Conservancy, which runs the park.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2006 | From Associated Press
"Macbeth" -- the Shakespeare tragedy no one mentions by name in a theater because of bad luck -- will be performed this summer in New York's Central Park, starring Liev Schreiber as the title character and Jennifer Ehle as Lady Macbeth. The free Public Theater production, to be directed by Moises Kaufman, will begin June 13 at the Delacorte Theater and run through July 9. For tickets, visit www.publictheater.org
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playboy Jazz in Central Park is always the centerpiece for the annual Old Pasadena Summer Fest, and this year's three-day event was no exception. With a lineup ranging from Jeff Lorber and the Harvey Mason Organization to Susie Hanson's Latin Jazz Band, the Banda Brothers and Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band, there was a little something for virtually every musical taste. Sunday's program was a good example.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Central Park is almost synonymous with New York. But historians have long wondered whether the city's signature park was originally conceived the way it looks today. Were the ornate colorful tiles underneath the Bethesda Terrace a vision of the original designers? What about elegant black lamps that dot the park? Now historians might finally have some clues about the park's design. Illustrations for features of Central Park and other public places in New York have resurfaced, and the city has gone to court to get them back.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Six established New York City hotels -- the Iroquois New York, Hotel Chandler, Hotel Belleclaire, the Cosmopolitan, the Gershwin and the Washington Jefferson -- have banded together to form Triumph Hotels. In honor of the new brand, guests who stay at least three nights have their choice of a free neighborhood experience. The deal: It's called the Key to New York City package and features six add-on experiences based on where hotels are located. Guests may go on one of the outings or choose one-way car service between the hotels and any of the city's three airports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2014 | Angel Jennings
At the Sunday drum circle at Leimert Park, the hypnotic beat of African drums breathes life into the neighborhood. Artists showcase their work. Vendors hawk clothes, soap and incense. It almost feels like nothing has changed in the 20 years since this was the vibrant heart of the African American arts and culture scene in Los Angeles. On other days, though, Leimert Park Village is a ghost town of broken windows and vacant storefronts. In its heyday, the neighborhood was something of a West Coast Harlem dotted with jazz cafes, performance spaces and art galleries, and it was the community's gathering spot after the 1992 riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Civic leaders in Irvine have authorized the use of subpoenas to help auditors delve deeper into an investigation of the financial management of the Orange County Great Park. The City Council voted 3-2 Tuesday to move forward with a forensic audit after a preliminary report raised questions about spending, contracts and oversight of the 1,300-park, which has been in the works for more than a decade. Council members Larry Agran and Beth Krom, who helped steward the project from its beginnings until they lost the council majority in the city's 2012 elections, denounced the  decision, which Krom called a “witch hunt.” Great Park: where did all the money go?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Civic leaders in Irvine have authorized the use of subpoenas to help auditors dig deeper into an investigation of the financial management of the Orange County Great Park. The City Council voted 3 to 2 this week to move forward with a forensic audit after a preliminary report raised questions about spending, contracts and oversight of the planned 1,300-acre park, which has been in the works for more than a decade. Council members Larry Agran and Beth Krom, who helped steward the project from its beginnings until they lost the council majority in the 2012 city election, denounced the decision, which Krom called a "witch hunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Preliminary findings of an audit of the Great Park showed irregularities and raises questions about the financial and structural management of the $200-million project. Among other things, the review concludes that some contractors who were awarded low-bid contracts ultimately billed the city far more than originally estimated, in most cases because of change orders approved by the Irvine City Council. The contractor that won the right to construct a preview park, for instance, ended up billing the city five times its original bid. In some instances, services were paid for twice, and some work done by a public relations consultant for individual council members was billed to the park, the report says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
If you liked "wilding," you're gonna love the "knockout game. " I have just become aware, thanks to Fox News and an author who publishes under the conspiracy-minded World Net Daily imprint, that roving gangs of black adolescents are marauding through our streets, randomly attacking innocent white victims in a racist ritual known as the "knockout game. " The motive is mischief, not robbery. These impeccable sources also claim the mainstream media, in a woeful act of political correctness, refuse to report the racial nature of this crime wave.
NEWS
September 13, 1999 | Associated Press
Frederick Law Olmsted, one of the founders of American landscape architecture and the designer of New York's Central Park, was honored Sunday with a 33-cent stamp from the U.S. Postal Service. Olmsted, who lived in Brookline, Mass., designed several parks in the Boston area, including the "Emerald Necklace," a ring of parks around the city. The stamp is a montage that includes a John Singer Sargent portrait of Olmsted, a photograph of Central Park and two of his landscape plans.
OPINION
November 20, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The idea was splendid: Turn the flat, featureless Marine Corps Air Station El Toro into a vast, bucolic landscape of forests, lawns, a man-made canyon and lake, alongside sports fields, botanical gardens and museums. There would be something for everyone, an oasis of nature surrounded by suburbia and also a center to gather for concerts and museums. It was to be the Great Park, Orange County's answer to Balboa Park in San Diego and twice as big as New York's Central Park. But more than a decade later, about 230 acres of the 1,347-acre parcel are in use, and nearly half of that is leased for commercial farming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
Orange County Great Park designer Ken Smith was hired for his vision. When he looked out at 1,300 acres of runways and abandoned buildings at a former military base in Irvine, he imagined a gathering place that could provide a center to this sprawling county, rivaling New York's Central Park and San Diego's Balboa Park. But after years of designing an ambitious park, for which he and his team were paid millions, it seems increasingly likely that Smith's vision will be pushed aside in favor of a more pragmatic plan.
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