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NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Creating design by hand gets expensive; creating design by hand in L.A., even more so. But today we have some budget-minded offerings from Los Angeles artist Bianca Pulitzer, whose ceramics are the latest installment of our Handmade Holidays gift guide. Pulitzer's Bone napkin rings -- glazed stoneware pieces stamped with expressions related to appetite, from "starved" to "sated" -- are just $5 apiece. Beautifully simple Textured napkin rings made of hand-carved white porcelain are just $10 each.
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NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
"Why just women?" Pat Kirkham asks in the foreword to the new book "California's Designing Women 1896-1986. " "The point is that we should not have to separate women designers out for special attention in the first place, were there not such a long history of women being marginalized," the design historian writes. Like the exhibition of the same name that ran at the Autry National Center in 2012, "California's Designing Women 1896-1986" recognizes 46 female designers, spanning the Arts and Crafts and postmodern eras, who made significant contributions to American commercial design and fine craft.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010
$4-million ceramics gift Thanks to a grateful alumna from the class of 1949, Scripps College and the affiliated Claremont Graduate University are getting $4 million in dough to benefit art students learning to work with clay. The gift for ceramic art programs at the two institutions in Claremont comes from Joan Lincoln and her husband, David, who live in Paradise Valley, Ariz. It includes a $3.5-million pledge to Scripps, funding a new, 3,000-square-foot ceramics building and an endowment for various ceramic art studies programs and exhibitions, and $500,000 to establish an endowment for graduate student scholarships at Claremont Graduate University.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By L.A. at Home staff
It's crunch time, holiday shoppers -- that moment in the season where we stop messing around and go with what works. In the realm of gifts, that includes Magnolia Ceramics.  The L.A. at Home crew first got to know the man behind Magnolia, Warner Walcott, through a Times home profile in 2008. Since then we've come to admire the beautiful simplicity of his work at ceramics shows and in smartly styled stores.   HANDMADE HOLIDAYS: More gift picks For locals who worry about missing holiday shipping deadlines, one easy stop is the Beverly Boulevard boutique Garde , which has a range of Walcott's work from about $200 to $950.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By L.A. at Home staff
Cranbrook grads and recent California transplants Marie Perrin-McGraw and Robert Turek have developed a new collection of ceramics that will seem fresh to even the most devoted attendees of L.A.'s artisan pop-up markets and "maker" fairs. The eye-grabbers of the Lustered Walnut line are ceramic mugs with handholds shaped like bananas or cross-handle faucets, but what drew our attention were more delicate pieces made with a slipcasting process that lends a rougher, more handmade finish.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Los Angeles ceramist Jen Kuroki doesn't want to see her handmade vessels sitting in a cabinet. "It's important to me that people use my pieces," she says. "I don't want my pieces to be precious. "  That shouldn't be a problem. Kuroki's stoneware kitchen canisters, planters and jewelry are lovely and utilitarian, pieces that are meant to be used every day.  GIFTS PICKS: Handcrafted and cool "I hope they add some fun and make people smile," Kuroki says. "I just don't want them sitting in the cabinet getting lonely.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Jay Kvapil's new, variably intriguing ceramic work at Couturier is largely about surface -- viscous, painterly glazes and cratered shells. With only a few exceptions, the vessel forms are understated and conventional. They call little attention to themselves and instead serve as vehicles for potent color and assertive texture. Kvapil titled an earlier series "Pictorial Vessels," making explicit the priority given to surface as bearer of image or mark. Several works here continue in that vein, their glazes like thick, draping garments extending below the cylindrical body of a cup or vase.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Ask Mickey Fielding how she makes her Cluster -- a ceramic tripod of snack bowls, balanced on pointed feet -- and the artist pauses, then lets out a sigh. "It's painstaking," she says. Fielding throws each bowl individually, then lays them out on the kiln shelf, upside down. She puts clay bricks under shorter bowls (ensuring the Cluster will be properly balanced when stood right-side up on a table). Only at that point can Fielding add what she calls "the little umbilical cords. " The finished arrangement cannot move before it's fired, or else the whole thing will simply fall apart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Kenneth Price, a prolific Los Angeles artist whose work with glazed and painted clay transformed traditional ceramics while also expanding orthodox definitions of American and European sculpture, died early Friday at his home and studio in Taos, N.M. He was 77. Price had struggled with tongue and throat cancer for several years, his food intake restricted to liquids supplied through a feeding tube. Despite his infirmity, he continued to produce challenging new work and to mount critically acclaimed exhibitions at galleries in Los Angeles, New York and Europe.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
We set out to find 53 unique holiday gift picks from indie artists, artisans and craftspeople -- one every day from now until Christmas Eve -- and thought it a fitting to start with Kat Hutter and Roger Lee, whose studio is one of several making Los Angeles such a good place to be for fans of modern ceramics. The artists, who maintain separate careers in painting ( Hutter ) and ceramics ( Lee ), have been blending their talents for an interesting collection of graphic pieces appearing in some of L.A.'s more interesting stores.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By L.A. at Home staff
Cranbrook grads and recent California transplants Marie Perrin-McGraw and Robert Turek have developed a new collection of ceramics that will seem fresh to even the most devoted attendees of L.A.'s artisan pop-up markets and "maker" fairs. The eye-grabbers of the Lustered Walnut line are ceramic mugs with handholds shaped like bananas or cross-handle faucets, but what drew our attention were more delicate pieces made with a slipcasting process that lends a rougher, more handmade finish.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Creating design by hand gets expensive; creating design by hand in L.A., even more so. But today we have some budget-minded offerings from Los Angeles artist Bianca Pulitzer, whose ceramics are the latest installment of our Handmade Holidays gift guide. Pulitzer's Bone napkin rings -- glazed stoneware pieces stamped with expressions related to appetite, from "starved" to "sated" -- are just $5 apiece. Beautifully simple Textured napkin rings made of hand-carved white porcelain are just $10 each.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Jay Kvapil's new, variably intriguing ceramic work at Couturier is largely about surface -- viscous, painterly glazes and cratered shells. With only a few exceptions, the vessel forms are understated and conventional. They call little attention to themselves and instead serve as vehicles for potent color and assertive texture. Kvapil titled an earlier series "Pictorial Vessels," making explicit the priority given to surface as bearer of image or mark. Several works here continue in that vein, their glazes like thick, draping garments extending below the cylindrical body of a cup or vase.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Ask Mickey Fielding how she makes her Cluster -- a ceramic tripod of snack bowls, balanced on pointed feet -- and the artist pauses, then lets out a sigh. "It's painstaking," she says. Fielding throws each bowl individually, then lays them out on the kiln shelf, upside down. She puts clay bricks under shorter bowls (ensuring the Cluster will be properly balanced when stood right-side up on a table). Only at that point can Fielding add what she calls "the little umbilical cords. " The finished arrangement cannot move before it's fired, or else the whole thing will simply fall apart.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Like so many handmade designs, Bari Ziperstein's stoneware coasters are distinctive in their size, color and shape. The Glassell Park artist said she is inspired by Finnish patterns and the California desert in creating her Bzippy & Co. collection, which includes jewelry, brutalist vases and bowls, bud vases and pyramid lamps. The heavy stoneware coasters are hand-painted circles or hexagons, easily stacked on a table. A set of four is $45. They're available at Individual Melody in Los Angeles, ReForm School in Silver Lake, Fifth Floor in Chinatown, Platform in Highland Park, the Orange County Museum of Art Museum Shop in Newport Beach and BKB Ceramics   in Joshua Tree.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
"I'm proudly analog," says Adam Silverman, and the Los Angeles architect-turned-fashion-designer-turned-potter isn't kidding. Where most modern travelers might fuss over laptops, tablets or smartphones during their airplane flights, Silverman obsessed over an entirely different kind of luggage during recent trips from Fort Worth, Texas. There, to create pots honoring the 40th anniversary of the Kimbell Art Museum's Louis I. Kahn building, Silverman excavated clay from a construction site for its new Renzo Piano wing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Adrian Saxe is a ceramic artist known for juxtaposing the Historic and the Now with a trippy sense of humor. His latest musings in the show "GRIN — Genetic Robotic Information Nano," at Frank Lloyd Gallery through Jan. 7, incorporate Quick Response (QR) codes, or the square bar codes, into sculpture that emulate antique Chinese vases and scholar's rocks — rocks collected for their unusual and evocative forms. "Made to seduce and then betray, Saxe's elegant vessels present provocative concepts," curator Martha Drexler Lynn wrote for his 1993 retrospective at LACMA, "The Clay Art of Adrian Saxe.
HOME & GARDEN
February 27, 2010 | Barbara Thornburg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Doreen Mellen can think of only one artist in her past — a great-aunt who painted on velvet. So it's hard to pinpoint the source of Mellen's talent and desire. "Somewhere along the way I just had this yearning," says Mellen, a ceramicist who grew up in Tasmania, the daughter of a train conductor and a housewife. "I was constantly doodling in school — even when I wasn't suppose to be. I'm a completely self-taught artist." After working for seven years in Brisbane, Australia, designing and manufacturing a line of women and children's clothing, she moved with her computer executive husband, Brian, to Canada in 1979.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
For an artist who calls her studio Humble Ceramics, it's fitting that Delphine Lippens reduces all of her work to circles and rectangles -- a minimalist binary of O's and I's, she says, simple and clean forms that nevertheless have a complex beauty. Last year we were drawn to her cork-lidded containers. This year we're all about her cazuelas and cazuelitas, which are something between dishes and bowls. Beyond the practical uses for such a piece, there is the lovely presence of the hand: Lippens fires up each piece at 2340 degrees to achieve the proper finish, leaving tiny air bubbles and warps as hints of their artist origins.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
For our next pick of unique holiday gifts, we head to the high desert: Brian Bosworth of BKB Ceramics in Joshua Tree. Among Bosworth's newest works is his Spectrum series, in which he melds a Japanese raku process with colors rooted in the midcentury design of nearby Palm Springs. "I am trying to keep with the primary palette of modernism," Bosworth said. The pieces pictured here range from $45 to $110, bought through his showroom (open on weekends or by appointment) or through his BKB Ceramics website , where you can see other examples of his work.
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