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Chad Revolts

NEWS
September 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Libya and Chad announced a truce in their territorial war Friday, but it was soured almost immediately by accusations and denials of new Libyan air raids in Chad. The cease-fire, sponsored by the Organization of African Unity, began at midday, but Chadian radio reported new Libyan bombings. Libya said its planes struck only in the morning.
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NEWS
September 8, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
French troops shot down a Libyan bomber over the capital of Chad on Monday, prompting more uneasiness in Paris over France's growing involvement against its will in an escalation of the war in Central Africa. The bomber, a Soviet Tupolev 22, was blasted by an American-made Hawk missile as it joined two other Libyan bombers on a punitive raid on Chad in retaliation for a Chadian invasion and seizure of a military base in Libya two days earlier.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | JENNIFER PARMELEE, Associated Press
Libyan military officers Saturday displayed arms and Chadian soldiers they said were captured in retaking the desert outpost of Aozou in the disputed Aozou Strip from Chad. Chad continued to deny that Libya recaptured the village of Aozou in its first victory after a string of costly Libyan defeats in northern Chad and in the border area, which both countries claim as their own.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | From Reuters
Chadian rebel leader and former President Goukouni Oueddei is expected to fly home soon following his declaration Thursday that he now recognizes Chad's current leader, Hissen Habre, as the legitimate head of state, Gabonese Foreign Ministry sources said.
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | From Reuters
Libya said Sunday that the Aozou Strip whose sovereignty it disputes with Chad is an indivisible part of Libyan Arab land that is not open to negotiation. The People's Committee for Foreign Liaison (Foreign Ministry) said in Tripoli that the strip " . . . has not been, is not now and will not be in the future an object of bargaining, international arbitration or concession." A statement by the committee was carried by the Libyan news agency Jana, monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
When American warplanes bombed Libya a year ago, President Reagan called it "a single engagement in the long battle against terrorism" and vowed that the United States would keep using military force until Libya and other nations "end the pursuit of terror for political goals." Since then, there have been no additional American strikes. And terrorists have remained active. A senior U.S.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
One year after the American bombing of Libya, Col. Moammar Kadafi faces what Arab and Western analysts consider the most serious internal crisis of his long, mercurial reign as ruler of the Libyan state. These analysts said they doubt that opposition to Kadafi is serious enough to overthrow him. But they added that his opponents are expected to preoccupy him for some time and perhaps even have the same depressant effect on Libyan-sponsored terrorism that the U.S. attack had for a brief period.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | Associated Press
President Hissen Habre joined his people Saturday in celebrating Chad's sweeping military victory over Libyan forces and said he is ready to open immediate peace talks with Libya's Moammar Kadafi. "Chad wants peace. If the Libyan regime wants to open a dialogue with us in order to find a peaceful solution to the conflict, we are ready at any moment," Habre said at a joint news conference with visiting President Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire.
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