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Chairman Mao

MAGAZINE
September 7, 1986 | TED GUP, Ted Gup, a staff writer for the Washington Post, was recently a Fulbright lecturer in journalism in Peking. After graduation, his student writers will be assigned to New China News Agency, China's official news agency.
Ten years ago this week, on Sept. 9, 1976, Mao Tse-tung died. In this century, no individual has stood so much at the center of so many lives. There was not one but several Maos--soldier, revolutionary, poet. To some he appears a kind of patron saint, a man who led China out of war and famine and feudalism; others--victims of the Cultural Revolution--remember that the same man who led them to salvation later led them to the brink of self-destruction.
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NEWS
December 19, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans by the British Broadcasting Corp. to televise a documentary depicting the late Chinese ruler, Chairman Mao Tse-tung, as a sex-obsessed tyrant have drawn severe objections by the government of China, but the BBC pledged Saturday not to pull the broadcast. The Chinese said that the British government should be "fully aware of the consequences" if the documentary, "Chairman Mao--The Last Emperor," airs as scheduled on Monday night's "Timewatch" public affairs program.
OPINION
May 21, 2006 | Li Zhensheng, LI ZHENSHENG, who has chronicled and lectured on the Cultural Revolution, is the author of "Red Color News Soldier." An exhibition of his photos is coming to Los Angeles next year. This article was written with the assistance of journalist Jacques Menasche.
FORTY YEARS AGO, on May 16, 1966, Chairman Mao Tse-tung unleashed the Cultural Revolution on China. At the time, I was a 25-year-old photographer living in Harbin, the capital of the northeastern province of Heilongjiang. Only a few months earlier I had returned from the countryside, where I had been sent for a year and a half during the Socialist Education Movement to share the hardship of the peasants and to spread revolutionary fervor.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | DEBRA GENDEL, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
The most cerebral question posed by designers here centered on hemlines. Mid-thigh? Knee-grazing? Ankle-length? Mind-numbing? Oh, yes. We'd rather mull over which of designer Vivienne Tam's Andy Warhol-esque Chairman Mao images are the most irreverent. Mao in pigtails? Mao with bubble-gum pink lips? Mao being stung on the nose by a bumblebee? "That one is called 'Ow Mao,' " Tam said in her showroom Friday afternoon.
OPINION
August 10, 2008
Re "Human rights take field in China," Aug. 6 In my travels in China as long as 13 years ago -- when the air was nowhere near as dirty as it is now -- I saw Chinese citizens all over Beijing wearing surgical masks to protect themselves from the polluted air. Our cyclists were doing the same, and have nothing to apologize for. The Chinese should look in the mirror before claiming to have been deeply offended. Mark W. Dixon Newport Beach Before we use the Olympics as a tool to brazenly criticize life in China, why don't we first tend our own garden?
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From Reuters
China said Friday that its population had reached 1.1 billion, twice as many people as at the time of the 1949 revolution, and warned of national disaster unless fresh efforts are made to enforce birth control. Government leaders and the state-run media acknowledged that the country's Draconian policy of one child per family had largely failed and said population could reach an intolerable 2 billion next century if birth control is neglected. The Communist Party newspaper People's Daily said China made a grave mistake by rejecting the advice of population experts in the 1950s, but did not name the leader then--Chairman Mao Tse-tung.
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
The former imperial compound where the late Chairman Mao Tse-tung lived for nearly two decades is today a slightly shabby place where selected Chinese tourists are presented an image of a man who loved books and table tennis. Built with gray bricks, gray roof tiles and vermilion columns in the traditional Chinese style around a 60-foot-by- 80-foot tree-shaded courtyard, the 325-year-old residence now has something of the lifeless aura of a poorly maintained ancient history museum.
WORLD
October 18, 2009 | Barbara Demick
You can't help but wonder whether Mao Tse-tung would be rolling over in his mausoleum if he could hear the ka-ching! of cash registers ringing up the amazing array of tchotchkes, from snow globes to glow-in-the-dark figurines, sold with his likeness. Or if the founder of Communist China, who fretted about "the serious tendency toward capitalism among the well-to-do peasants," could hear this blithe assertion by a visitor here: "I think that what Chairman Mao really intended was for Chinese people to get rich."
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