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Chairwoman

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BUSINESS
June 30, 2001 | Josh Friedman
Bridget Macaskill, one of the most prominent female executives in the mutual fund industry, was replaced as chairwoman and chief executive at New York-based OppenheimerFunds Inc. John V. Murphy, the firm's president and chief operating officer, was named to succeed Macaskill. Macaskill, who joined Oppenheimer in 1983 and became CEO in 1995, was known as a crusader who worked to encourage women to learn more about investing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Phil Willon, Maura Dolan and Scott Gold
ALTURAS, Calif. - The afternoon at City Hall was winding to a close on Thursday when a woman splattered with blood began ringing the bell and screaming for help. She had come around the corner from a tribal meeting where police say a woman shot and killed four people, three of them her relatives. The suspect, Cherie Lash Rhoades, previously had been chairwoman of the small Northern Paiute tribe, but the meeting was being held to evict her and her son from the rancheria. "It's not every day that you see someone covered in blood screaming at the window at City Hall," said Alturas Police Chief Ken Barnes.
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NEWS
May 18, 1989
The luncheon held at the Irvine Marriott Hotel on May 8 raised an estimated $75,000 for KOCE-TV, Channel 50. Bette Kain was chairwoman. The Jukebox Saturday Night auction held at Le Meridien Hotel in Newport Beach on Saturday raised an estimated $30,000 for the Women's Transitional Living Center. Molly Green was chairwoman.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2014 | By Andrew Tangel and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - The woman who indicted Osama bin Laden wants to strike fear into Wall Street. Mary Jo White, the former U.S. attorney in Manhattan who wanted to prosecute the terrorist mastermind before the 9/11 attacks, has tried to stiffen the backbone of the Securities and Exchange Commission since taking over as the agency's chairwoman in April. The SEC, like other regulators, customarily has allowed its targets to settle civil cases without admitting any wrongdoing. But under White, the nation's top stock market cop no longer will always let deep-pocketed investors and firms get away with merely writing a check for government penalties.
NEWS
June 1, 1989
The Celebrity Waiter Luncheon on May 10 at the Holiday Inn in Irvine raised an estimated $12,000 for the American Heart Assn. Karen Quirk was chairwoman. The tribute to James Roosevelt on May 20 at the Irvine Hilton and Towers earned an estimated $200,000 for Chapman College. Doy Henley was chairwoman. The Rock Around the Clock musical review on May 20 at the Doubletree Hotel in Orange raised an estimated $8,000 for the Eli Home for Abused Children. LorriGalloway was chairwoman.
NEWS
May 25, 1989
Linda Amling, left, Julie McFarlane and hostess Pat DeAngelo at luncheon honoring donors of $13,000 to Santa Ana Auxiliary of the Children's Home Society. Murray and chairwoman Murel Brown with '40s Lincoln during the " 'S Wonderful" dinner/auction on Saturday that raised $100,000 for South County Community Clinic.
MAGAZINE
July 3, 1988
Lee Dembart's article, "Kids on the Couch" (May 29), was just the right thing to dispel some of the anxiety parents invariably experience when they need help with their children. Early intervention can prevent much trouble in the future. KATO VAN LEEUWEN CHAIRWOMAN, CHILD AND ADOLESCENT ANALYSIS SECTION OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PSYCHOANALYTIC INSTITUTE Los Angeles
NEWS
May 11, 1989
The luncheon and fashion show on April 22 at the Newport Marriott raised an estimated $5,000 for the Boys Republic's scholarship fund. Marian Evans was chairwoman. The fashion show on April 29 at the Forum Theater in Yorba Linda raised an estimated $3,000 for North Orange County Community College District Community Services. Gaye Krpan was chairwoman. The "Une Soiree d'Art" dinner and auction on April 29 at the Newport Beach Marriott Hotel raised an estimated $30,000 for the Newport Harbor Auxiliary of Children's Home Society.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | BRIDGET BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ben Vereen was the entertainer at the annual gala sponsored by the Founding Associates of the French Foundation for Alzheimer Research and he was determined all present be "enthusiastic about life." Beginning with "On the Sunny Side of the Street," he took his act through "Stand By Me" and "Smile Though Your Heart Is Breaking," moving offstage and out into the crowd of 550 who gathered Sunday in the Beverly Hilton's International ballroom.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - In its last workday of the year, the Democratic-controlled Senate overcame GOP objections Friday to confirm two high-profile Obama nominees to the Department of Homeland Security and the Internal Revenue Service, but put off final approval of Federal Reserve chairwoman candidate Janet L. Yellen until January as part of a late-night cease-fire so lawmakers could adjourn for the holiday recess. After heated debate, the Senate narrowly approved Alejandro Mayorkas, President Obama's controversial pick for the No. 2 job at Homeland Security, in a 54-41 vote.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Acting Federal Communications Commission Chairwoman Mignon Clyburn is not taking it easy during her final days as head of the regulatory agency. On Friday, Clyburn circulated a proposal to do away with the 40-year-old sports blackout rules, which allow the National Football League to blackout television coverage of games in a team's home market if it isn't sold out within 72 hours of kickoff. “Changes in the marketplace have raised questions about whether these rules are still in the public interest, particularly at a time when high ticket prices and the economy make it difficult for many sports fans to attend games," Clyburn said in a statement.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The Senate on Monday confirmed Mary Jo White to chair the Securities and Exchange Commission, placing a tough former prosecutor in the role as Wall Street's top watchdog. White was confirmed by a unanimous voice vote in the Senate, an indication of broad bipartisan support. The Senate Banking Committee voted 22-1 to approve her nomination last month, with the only no vote coming from Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio). Brown has been critical of federal officials in general for not being tougher on Wall Street.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Senators questioned two of President Obama's nominees for key financial regulatory positions, and Democrats and Republicans appeared to like both of them. But only one of those candidates is expected to be confirmed. Mary Jo White, a former federal prosecutor, was on track to be confirmed as chairwoman of the Securities and Exchange Commission after Tuesday's hearing by the Senate Banking committee. However, the path for Richard Cordray, the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau who has been renominated by Obama, was still blocked by Republicans who want changes to the agency.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - As a lawyer in private practice, Mary Jo White worked for Wall Street all-stars: banking giant JPMorgan Chase & Co., auditor Deloitte & Touche, former Bank of America Corp. chief Ken Lewis. White, President Obama's pick to lead the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, even did legal work for former Goldman Sachs Group Inc. director Rajat Gupta, the highest-profile catch in the federal government's crackdown on insider trading, according to disclosures White filed ahead of her U.S. Senate confirmation hearing.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
After investigating a fire that broke out on Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliner passenger jet, the National Transportation Safety Board said that backup protections in the aircraft's lithium-ion batteries and electronics systems failed. But the safety agency hasn't reached a conclusion on the cause of the fire that occurred in Boston on Jan. 7 and partly led to last week's grounding of Dreamliners worldwide that remains in effect. Speaking to reporters Thursday from Washington, NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said the agency hadn't determined what happened, but she added that the redundant safety systems installed by Boeing did not work.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | United Press International
Former Rep. Edith S. Green (D-Ore.), a schoolteacher whose Capitol Hill career spanned 20 years of championing education and equal rights, died Tuesday night of pancreatic cancer, Meridian Park Hospital officials said. She was 77. In 1955, Green introduced the first bill to require that men and women receive the same wages for the same tasks. The notion became law eight years later. Green was Oregon chairwoman for the presidential campaigns of John and Robert Kennedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2010 | By Rich Connell, Los Angeles Times
L.A.'s new, showcase downtown community green, which turned brown and died within months, appears to be headed for a renewal. The chairwoman of the nonprofit Los Angeles Police Foundation said Friday that she has authorized the immediate release of funds to recondition the 1-acre lawn in the shadow of the new Los Angeles Police Department headquarters. The action came the day The Times published an article about the popular open space, which was a rare, lush expanse of grass when it was dedicated less than a year ago. "We'll figure out when to start work, and we'll get it done," said Cindy Miscikowski, the group's board chairwoman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2013 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
The chief of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission made her first visit Monday to the troubled San Onofre nuclear plant, offering assurance that the facility will remain closed until its safety is certain but giving few hints about its ultimate fate. NRC Chairwoman Allison Macfarlane traveled to California for the first time since taking office in July to visit the closed plant and meet with elected officials, environmentalists and plant workers' union representatives. The plant has been shut for nearly a year because of unexpected deterioration of tubes in its four giant steam generators, replaced less than two years earlier.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Mary L. Schapiro's departure as head of the Securities and Exchange Commission will leave the agency - at least temporarily - deadlocked as it continues to try to enact tough reforms on Wall Street. Schapiro, 57, said Monday that she will resign effective Dec. 14. President Obama quickly designated SEC Commissioner Elisse B. Walter as the agency's new chairwoman. Walter is not expected to radically change the regulator's agenda. But her move will leave the five-member SEC commission one person short - and effectively deadlocked on controversial issues such as Dodd-Frank financial reform, new regulations for money market mutual funds and a push to rein in high-speed trading.
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