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Chameleon

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
It helps that "The Chameleon" is based on a true story because much of what occurs in writer-director Jean-Paul Salomé's tight adaptation of Christophe D'Antonio's book might otherwise seem a bit dubious. That's not to say this moody thriller about professional liar Frédéric Bourdin is without intrigue, it's just better viewed with, er, logistical tolerance. The film finds Nicky, a Baton Rouge, La., youngster missing since 1996, turning up four years later in France claiming he was abducted from his hometown with traumatic consequences.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | Carolyn Kellogg
"Police! Open Up!" is regularly heard at the door of the Chameleon Club, the fictional cabaret in Francine Prose's new novel set in 1930s Paris. Unconventional verging on illicit, the club's revue features sexually ambiguous performers who dance before a predominantly lesbian clientele - in an era when laws existed prohibiting a woman from dressing as a man. And yet the club is tolerated by authorities and celebrated by the city's artists, intellectuals and...
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NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Maeve Reston
The super PAC supporting Jon Huntsman's bid for the Republican nomination launched its first attack ad of the political season Friday - releasing a new spot that describes Huntsman as the consistent conservative in the Republican race and New Hampshire frontrunner Mitt Romney as “a chameleon.” The $300,000 buy aimed at New Hampshire voters, who will vote on Jan. 10, seeks to portray Romney as a political opportunist while elevating Huntsman, who...
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Maeve Reston
The super PAC supporting Jon Huntsman's bid for the Republican nomination launched its first attack ad of the political season Friday - releasing a new spot that describes Huntsman as the consistent conservative in the Republican race and New Hampshire frontrunner Mitt Romney as “a chameleon.” The $300,000 buy aimed at New Hampshire voters, who will vote on Jan. 10, seeks to portray Romney as a political opportunist while elevating Huntsman, who...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | DON WALLER
Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes. This is not the latest David Bowie album, but rather the first LP from a new quartet of which rock's eternal chameleon is merely the most famous member. Right. Either way, this is one crushing record, recorded mostly live in the studio with a minimum of overdubs and bristling with a cold fury. If it were a movie it'd be titled something like "The Attack of the Giant Ice Crusher." Anchored by Bowie's impassioned singing and minimal rhythm guitar work, lead guitarist Reeves Gabriels stomps out a wailing maelstrom of white noise that's matched by the hard-charging rhythm section of drummer Hunt Sales and his brother bassist Tony.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1986
A glaring omission was made in the category of "cream of the next generation of character performers." Benson left out Dabney Coleman, one of the best actors, character or otherwise, today. He is easily recognized, yet always disappears into each role whether it be comedy or dramatic. He is, in a word, a chameleon--the highest accolade given to a character actor. ROSEMARY ESKEN Upland
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997
As eighth-grader Jennifer Sherman read verses Tuesday morning relating the biblical account of creation, creatures great and small barked, squawked and wriggled on the quadrangle at Chaminade College Preparatory Middle School. The menagerie of pets, including a rat named Al and a parrot named Sadie, along with their owners and about 600 students gathered for the Catholic school's annual Blessing of the Animals.
BOOKS
November 17, 1991
Thank you for your cover article "Cher If You Dare," by Hilary de Vries (Nov. 3). Having been a stalwart fan of Cher's for as long as I can remember, I can't help but admire the qualities that make this lady a true superstar. She is strong and enduring, honest and outspoken, yet she looks so vulnerable and beautiful. But most important, she goes by what's in her heart and soul.
NEWS
November 15, 1985 | United Press International
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, stepping up his debate with the Supreme Court, said that interpreting the Constitution's "spirit" and not its words turns the historic document into a "chameleon."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
One of Ann Magnuson's earliest TV memories is John F. Kennedy's funeral. "I think all the bands that played made a big impression, because all of us neighborhood kids went out and banged on pots and pans," she recalled. "Then I made a papier-mache model of the President and we all tried to revive him. I called it our assassination game." Magnuson winced. "I remember my mother was appalled. She told us to knock it off."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
It helps that "The Chameleon" is based on a true story because much of what occurs in writer-director Jean-Paul Salomé's tight adaptation of Christophe D'Antonio's book might otherwise seem a bit dubious. That's not to say this moody thriller about professional liar Frédéric Bourdin is without intrigue, it's just better viewed with, er, logistical tolerance. The film finds Nicky, a Baton Rouge, La., youngster missing since 1996, turning up four years later in France claiming he was abducted from his hometown with traumatic consequences.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2011 | Ben Fritz and Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Paramount Pictures' "Rango," a family movie about a chameleon sheriff in the Wild West voiced by Johnny Depp, marks the studio's entry into the crowded field of big-budget digital animation. The little critter could cause some big headaches. Computer animation is one of Hollywood's few growth industries, with nearly every major studio now wanting to stake a claim in a market dominated by Pixar Animation, Disney and DreamWorks Animation. And "Rango," which opens Friday, will put Paramount into direct competition with one of those industry giants, DreamWorks, which has been the studio's chief supplier of family animated films.
TRAVEL
December 5, 2010 | By Jay Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Las Vegas If you take stock of the Vegas landscape, it's no wonder several Las Vegas clubs are hosting "good riddance to 2010" New Year's Eve parties. The construction cranes atop the flashy but bankrupt Fontainebleau resort, between the Sahara and the Riviera, haven't moved in months. Opposite the Riviera, plywood-covered fences try to hide the foundations for Echelon, a CityCenter wannabe whose owners have pulled the plug, at least temporarily. And at CityCenter, the multi-billion-dollar hotel/retail behemoth that debuted a year ago, the problem-plagued Harmon Hotel will not open this month as expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
There's no other way to say it: Pascal was just a party pooper. After a few early test screenings, Disney animators knew things weren't working with the chameleon character in the new animated musical "Tangled," which opens Nov. 24. "We weren't getting enough entertainment out of Pascal," admits supervising animator Lino DiSalvo. "Animation-wise, originally, he was very realistic. He moved like a real chameleon, his eyes would move independently. " And while that's fine for fans of the bug-eyed reptiles, this particular creature just wasn't giving off the right vibe for a princess movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2009 | By Ann Powers POP MUSIC CRITIC >>>
"A year ago this month I was opening for Natasha Bedingfield and the New Kids on the Block -- at this theater," said Lady Gaga on Monday night during the first of her three sold-out performances at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live. She was posing as usual, her body elegantly contorted to show off a dazzlingly weird outfit. But she was also smiling, cracking a warm and surprisingly unaffected grin. Gaga has arrived. She knows it, even when she sprawls on the floor in her cruelly shiny black bustier and declares herself a gothic Tinkerbell, in danger of dying unless her fans scream.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2009 | Tony Perry
"Frontline" checks in tonight with a gloomy assessment of the war against the Taliban in Afghanistan and an equally pessimistic view of whether the U.S. can prod/seduce/jawbone/bribe the Pakistani government into truly confronting Al Qaeda forces in its border region. In political terms, the title says it all: "Obama's War." President Obama has called Afghanistan "a necessary war" compared with the war in Iraq, which he opposed and vows to end. The rhetoric helped squelch Hillary Rodham Clinton -- an early supporter of the Iraq war -- in the Democratic primaries and defeat the hawkish John McCain in the general election.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Few musicians on the contemporary scene can claim a record of more continual growth than Roger Kellaway. The former Angeleno has been associated, as composer and/or pianist, with every major facet of jazz, classical and popular music.
OPINION
March 22, 1992 | Hendrik Hertzberg, Hendrik Hertzberg is a senior editor of the New Republic
For Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr., it all came together in Michigan. No, I don't mean the alienated voting bloc that yielded the Californian one-quarter of the tally and second place in the Motor State primary, thereby allowing him to elbow his way past Paul E. Tsongas for the honor of serving as Bill Clinton's sparring partner for the next few months. What came together was the white turtleneck, the plaid flannel work shirt and the blue satin United Auto Workers windbreaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009 | Dennis Lim
To many moviegoers who came of age in the '70s, Alec Guinness was synonymous with the cowled "Star Wars" guru Obi-Wan Kenobi. For this most chameleonic of actors, whose career ranged from London's West End to Broadway, from Ealing comedies to David Lean epics to John le Carre thrillers, this was apparently a source of consternation (he claimed to throw out all "Star Wars" fan mail unopened).
IMAGE
September 21, 2008 | Monica Corcoran, Times Staff Writer
"WHAT does it feel like to wear a corset?" asks Keira Knightley, looking amused. The actress rolls her molasses-brown eyes and starts to gasp as though she's choking on a fish bone. "Your ribs are crushed in and you can't get your breath. Oh, and if you get emotional, you just can't calm down at all," she says as her chest heaves. She takes a deep breath and adds: "You can certainly understand why women were known as the weaker sex." Not that she's complaining, mind you.
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