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BUSINESS
May 25, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
CHAMPUS Contract Protested: Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas Inc. has filed a protest with the General Accounting Office regarding the award of the CHAMPUS Region 6 managed-care support contract to Foundation Health Federal Services Inc., a unit of Cordova, Calif.-based Foundation Health Corp.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The General Accounting Office on Friday recommended that Foundation Health Corp. receive a five-year, $2.5-billion military health care contract--the nation's largest such pact--which had originally been awarded to a unit of rival Health Systems International Inc. Shares of Rancho Cordova, Calif.-based Foundation Health jumped 7% on the news.
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NEWS
October 6, 1987 | Associated Press
The Pentagon, concerned about rising health insurance costs, said Monday it has ordered military hospitals to treat more dependents of servicemen and retirees instead of sending them to civilian facilities. The decision, which was outlined in a memorandum sent Sept. 25 to the secretaries of the Air Force, Navy and Army, is part of a new effort called "Project Restore," created by Dr. William Mayer, assistant defense secretary for health affairs.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
CHAMPUS Contract Protested: Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas Inc. has filed a protest with the General Accounting Office regarding the award of the CHAMPUS Region 6 managed-care support contract to Foundation Health Federal Services Inc., a unit of Cordova, Calif.-based Foundation Health Corp.
NEWS
July 3, 1986
The emergency room at Long Beach Naval Hospital will be shut down beginning July 28 because of a shortage of doctors, the Navy has announced. The emergency room will be converted into a 24-hour-a-day sick call station for active military personnel only, said Capt. M. F. Hall. Dependents should seek emergency treatment through CHAMPUS military dependents' insurance, Medicare or private insurance, he said.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The General Accounting Office on Friday recommended that Foundation Health Corp. receive a five-year, $2.5-billion military health care contract--the nation's largest such pact--which had originally been awarded to a unit of rival Health Systems International Inc. Shares of Rancho Cordova, Calif.-based Foundation Health jumped 7% on the news.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The competition for a huge military health care contract in California and Hawaii has devolved into a gut-punching melee between rival health plans. Experts say the fight over the $3.5-billion contract--the biggest of its kind in America--is but an early glimpse of the corporate warfare that will spread across the country when giant new health purchasing alliances put even richer purses up for grabs. "This is just a warm-up fight," Dr. Jacque J.
NEWS
January 20, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The Defense Department, in a bid to overhaul its money-losing health insurance program for military dependents and retirees, has chosen California and Hawaii as the sites to test a new health-care delivery system, officials announced Tuesday. The $3-billion, five-year pilot project, which will be administered by Foundation Health Corp. of Sacramento, could affect as many as 845,000 people in the two states who now participate in the Pentagon's CHAMPUS health program, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1990 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a dog who loved kids and hated crooks. During his career, he bit more than 30 suspects. But he is best remembered by police for the time when he went out of his way to avoid biting a small child. On top of that, he had the best nose on the Oxnard Police Department when it came to sniffing out cocaine and other illegal drugs. But now a 9-year-old German shepherd named Champus Von Hallbachgrun is stepping down from active duty after 8,800 backup calls and five years in Oxnard's K-9 program.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foundation Wins Military Contract: The Rancho Cordova-based health maintenance organization said it has won a five-year, $648-million contract to provide managed health-care services to military dependents and retirees in Oregon and Washington state. Under the contract, Foundation will manage medical care for 230,000 beneficiaries of the Defense Department's Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services, or CHAMPUS.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The competition for a huge military health care contract in California and Hawaii has devolved into a gut-punching melee between rival health plans. Experts say the fight over the $3.5-billion contract--the biggest of its kind in America--is but an early glimpse of the corporate warfare that will spread across the country when giant new health purchasing alliances put even richer purses up for grabs. "This is just a warm-up fight," Dr. Jacque J.
NEWS
October 6, 1987 | Associated Press
The Pentagon, concerned about rising health insurance costs, said Monday it has ordered military hospitals to treat more dependents of servicemen and retirees instead of sending them to civilian facilities. The decision, which was outlined in a memorandum sent Sept. 25 to the secretaries of the Air Force, Navy and Army, is part of a new effort called "Project Restore," created by Dr. William Mayer, assistant defense secretary for health affairs.
NEWS
July 3, 1986
The emergency room at Long Beach Naval Hospital will be shut down beginning July 28 because of a shortage of doctors, the Navy has announced. The emergency room will be converted into a 24-hour-a-day sick call station for active military personnel only, said Capt. M. F. Hall. Dependents should seek emergency treatment through CHAMPUS military dependents' insurance, Medicare or private insurance, he said.
NEWS
September 29, 1987
The Defense Department's medical insurance program ran out of money earlier this month for the second time this year, creating a backlog of payments to patients, doctors and hospitals estimated at more than $100 million, officials said. David Newhall, the deputy assistant defense secretary for health affairs, said the Pentagon's CHAMPUS system has continued to process claims, but they will not be paid until after the start of the new fiscal year Thursday.
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