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Change To Win Coalition

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2007 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
Change to Win, the federation of unions that broke away from the AFL-CIO nearly two years ago, faces internal divides that could threaten its own viability, according to documents obtained by The Times.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2007 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
Change to Win, the federation of unions that broke away from the AFL-CIO nearly two years ago, faces internal divides that could threaten its own viability, according to documents obtained by The Times.
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BUSINESS
January 13, 2006 | From Associated Press
The United Farm Workers union has left the AFL-CIO and will join a group of breakaway unions known as the Change to Win Coalition, in a move the UFW hopes will boost recruiting efforts, officials said Thursday. The UFW, with about 27,000 members, joins the Service Employees International Union, the Teamsters, the United Food and Commercial Workers, Unite Here and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners in forming the dissident coalition.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2006 | From Associated Press
The United Farm Workers union has left the AFL-CIO and will join a group of breakaway unions known as the Change to Win Coalition, in a move the UFW hopes will boost recruiting efforts, officials said Thursday. The UFW, with about 27,000 members, joins the Service Employees International Union, the Teamsters, the United Food and Commercial Workers, Unite Here and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners in forming the dissident coalition.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Leaders from unions that broke away from the AFL-CIO pledged Tuesday to organize Wal-Mart Stores Inc. workers and reach out to those who lost their jobs because of Hurricane Katrina. The Change to Win Coalition met for its founding convention in St. Louis. In between official business -- adopting a new constitution and electing leaders of the new federation -- the event resembled a rally for the 460 delegates. Teamsters President James P.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
The small farmworkers union founded by labor hero Cesar Chavez joined a coalition of labor groups demanding changes in the AFL-CIO as the 50-year-old federation inched closer Friday to breaking up. The United Farm Workers union, organized in 1962 and now consisting of 27,000 members, brings to seven the number of unions in the Change to Win Coalition.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney, the center of a storm in the labor movement, was reelected to a fourth term Wednesday, just days after the defection of two major unions that sought his ouster. One of those unions -- the Service Employees International Union -- was headed by Sweeney when he was first elected AFL-CIO president in 1995. It joined the Teamsters in leaving the AFL-CIO on Monday. Sweeney faced no opposition for the four-year term.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2005 | From Reuters
The leader of a breakaway faction that has split the AFL-CIO, said Wednesday that his union would not mend ties with the 50-year-old umbrella group at the heart of the U.S. labor movement and that a new federation was needed to replace it. "The AFL-CIO as we know it will never exist again," said Andrew Stern, president of the Service Employees International Union. "We need to build something new ... start from zero."
BUSINESS
September 20, 2005 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Officials at two large labor unions announced Monday that they would end a long-running battle over who should represent thousands of low-wage workers caring for the elderly and young children in California. As part of a two-year national pact, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the Service Employees International Union agreed not to interfere with the other union's bargaining agreements.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2005 | From Associated Press
A union representing almost half a million apparel and hospitality workers has decided to bolt the AFL-CIO and join a half-dozen other unions seeking to focus labor more on recruiting. "It is time for the labor movement to make some changes," Unite Here's general president, Bruce Raynor, said Wednesday.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2008 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
Barack Obama consolidated his organized labor support Thursday with an AFL-CIO endorsement that puts much of Hillary Rodham Clinton's union muscle behind his bid for the White House. Obama's newly enlarged labor coalition could help the presumptive Democratic nominee appeal to some union constituencies that favored Clinton, including blue-collar whites in the Rust Belt and Latinos in the Southwest.
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