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Character Actor

NEWS
December 15, 1998 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norman Fell, a longtime character actor who played the irascible landlord Stanley Roper on the television sitcom "Three's Company", died Monday of cancer. He was 74. Fell died at the Motion Picture and Television Fund home in Woodland Hills, said Stan Schneider, his business manager for many years. With his exasperated expression and droopy eyes, Fell was a supporting actor who many recognized but few could identify by name.
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NEWS
July 26, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Brian Glover, the robust English character actor who liked to joke about his hefty size, died Thursday of complications from a brain tumor, his agent said. He was 63. Born in the Yorkshire town of Barnsley in the north of England, Glover began his career as a teacher and professional wrestler, turning to acting in his 30s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Kim Chan, a character actor who broke through in film playing Jerry Lewis' butler in "The King of Comedy," died Sunday in New York City. He was believed to be either 93 or 94, his niece told the New York Times. After emigrating as a boy with his family from the province of Canton, China, he worked at his family's Chinese restaurant in New York City's theater district and discovered show business. He started out appearing in small parts in plays. In 1957, he made his film debut as a radio announcer in "A Face in the Crowd."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2010 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
James Gammon, a character actor whose gravelly voice and craggy face made indelible memories in Sam Shepard plays, a spate of western TV shows and films, plus a comic turn in the baseball movie "Major League," has died. He was 70. Gammon died Friday surrounded by his family at his daughter's home in Costa Mesa, where he and his wife, Nancy, had been living. He had cancer of the adrenal glands and the liver. Gammon may be best known for his role as Lou Brown, manager of the hapless Cleveland Indians in the 1989 comedy "Major League" and its 1994 sequel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
John Quade, a veteran character actor who specialized in playing heavies and appeared in several Clint Eastwood movies, including "Every Which Way But Loose" and its sequel "Any Which Way You Can," has died. He was 71. Quade died in his sleep of natural causes Sunday at his home in Rosamond, near Lancaster, said his wife, Gwen Saunders. In a more than two-decade career in films and television that began in the late 1960s, Quade played character roles in numerous TV series and in films such as "Papillon," "The Sting" and Eastwood's "High Plains Drifter" and "The Outlaw Josey Wales."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2002 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Larry Dobkin, a television director and character actor whose acting credits spanned stage, radio, TV and films over seven decades, has died. He was 83. Dobkin, one of five actors who played detective Ellery Queen on radio, died of heart failure Oct. 28 at his home in Los Angeles. Dobkin appeared in more than 65 feature films, including "The Ten Commandments," "Julius Caesar," "Sweet Smell of Success," "The Defiant Ones," "North by Northwest," "Patton" and "Angels in the Outfield."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Graham P. Jarvis, a familiar character actor with a comedic image who worked steadily in films, television and theater for five decades, died Wednesday of multiple myeloma at his home in Pacific Palisades. He was 72. Perhaps best remembered for his role as Charlie Haggers in the 1970s series "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman," Jarvis more recently turned up in such diverse series as "7th Heaven" and "Six Feet Under."
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