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Character Actor

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July 26, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Brian Glover, the robust English character actor who liked to joke about his hefty size, died Thursday of complications from a brain tumor, his agent said. He was 63. Born in the Yorkshire town of Barnsley in the north of England, Glover began his career as a teacher and professional wrestler, turning to acting in his 30s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Kim Chan, a character actor who broke through in film playing Jerry Lewis' butler in "The King of Comedy," died Sunday in New York City. He was believed to be either 93 or 94, his niece told the New York Times. After emigrating as a boy with his family from the province of Canton, China, he worked at his family's Chinese restaurant in New York City's theater district and discovered show business. He started out appearing in small parts in plays. In 1957, he made his film debut as a radio announcer in "A Face in the Crowd."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Gervase Duan "G.D. " Spradlin, a character actor best known for playing authority figures in television and films, including "The Godfather: Part II" and "Apocalypse Now," has died. He was 90. Spradlin died of natural causes at his cattle ranch in San Luis Obispo on Sunday, said his grandson, Justin Demko. A former oil company lawyer and millionaire independent oil producer who didn't begin acting until he was in his 40s, the tall and lean Oklahoma native played his share of doctors, ministers, judges, military officers and historical figures during his more than 30-year acting career.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry Jones, veteran character actor of some three dozen motion pictures, 350 television shows and scores of Broadway stage productions spanning half a century, has died. He was 86. Jones, who earned a Tony Award for his work in 1958's "Sunrise at Campobello," died Monday at UCLA Medical Center of injuries sustained in a fall at his Santa Monica home. Born in Philadelphia and educated at St. Joseph's College, Jones began his long and versatile career on stage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, McLellan is a former Times staff writer
Harry Carey Jr., a venerable character actor who was believed to be the last surviving member of director John Ford's legendary western stock company, died Thursday. He was 91. Carey, whose career spanned more than 50 years and included such Ford classics as "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" and "The Searchers," died of natural causes in Santa Barbara, said Melinda Carey, a daughter. "In recent years, he became kind of the living historian of the modern era," film critic Leonard Maltin told The Times on Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2010 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
James Gammon, a character actor whose gravelly voice and craggy face made indelible memories in Sam Shepard plays, a spate of western TV shows and films, plus a comic turn in the baseball movie "Major League," has died. He was 70. Gammon died Friday surrounded by his family at his daughter's home in Costa Mesa, where he and his wife, Nancy, had been living. He had cancer of the adrenal glands and the liver. Gammon may be best known for his role as Lou Brown, manager of the hapless Cleveland Indians in the 1989 comedy "Major League" and its 1994 sequel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
John Quade, a veteran character actor who specialized in playing heavies and appeared in several Clint Eastwood movies, including "Every Which Way But Loose" and its sequel "Any Which Way You Can," has died. He was 71. Quade died in his sleep of natural causes Sunday at his home in Rosamond, near Lancaster, said his wife, Gwen Saunders. In a more than two-decade career in films and television that began in the late 1960s, Quade played character roles in numerous TV series and in films such as "Papillon," "The Sting" and Eastwood's "High Plains Drifter" and "The Outlaw Josey Wales."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By David Colker
Before Wes Anderson directed his first feature film, he'd hang out at an eclectic coffee shop in Dallas where he met a 70-something yoga teacher - Kumar Pallana - who was like a one-man Ed Sullivan variety show. To entertain customers in the cafe owned by his son, Pallana would juggle, do magic tricks and perform a vaudeville staple: plate spinning. Anderson and his buddy, actor-writer Owen Wilson, made Pallana an offer. "They said they were shooting a movie and 'Are you interested in being in it?
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