Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCharging
IN THE NEWS

Charging

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2010 | James Rainey
At Bar Marmont late Monday and into Tuesday's wee hours, the Chivas flowed, tuxedo ties came loose and conversation burbled. Executives for some of the world's top luxury brands made the scene, along with guests of … what's that? … a newspaper? Yes, a newspaper — or, more accurately, a multi-platform journalistic enterprise — brought investors, marketers, entrepreneurs and other luminaries together this week to rub elbows and consider subjects such as overcoming extravagance guilt and "the narrative behind the luxury purchase."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun, Maura Dolan and Kurt Streeter
As the Clippers struggled through a playoff loss in Oakland, the pressure on team owner Donald Sterling mounted Sunday with the release of additional minutes of a racially charged recording and a flurry of denunciations from President Obama, NBA players, fans and even the NAACP that had sought to honor him. The comments about blacks that were attributed to Sterling show "the United States continues to wrestle with the legacy of race and slavery and...
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1993
In all the brouhaha over TV violence, I don't understand why our lawmakers are not considering the most obvious solution in a capitalist society: Charge the broadcasters for what they show. This would cut down on murder and mayhem. A price tag could be worked out for every offensive act, escalating the rate for prime-time shows. The revenue generated could go towards important causes like education to make up for the junk kids see on TV. Why isn't anyone talking cash, since that's why the violence is aired in the first place?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Daniel Anker, an award-winning documentarian who used film to reexamine complex historical events, including Hollywood's portrayal of the Holocaust and a life-saving sled-dog run in Alaska, died Monday in New York. He was 50. The cause was pneumonia, a complication of his lymphoma, said his wife, Donna Santman. Anker made more than a dozen films during a 25-year career, including "Imaginary Witness: Hollywood and the Holocaust" (2004), "Music from the Inside Out" (2004) and "Scottsboro, An American Tragedy" (2000)
AUTOS
June 11, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
People who drive electric cars pay the equivalent of $1.51 per gallon of gas in fueling expense in California but only 83 cents in North Dakota, according to new federal government figures. The Energy Department data show the wide variability between states in the cost savings for charging electric vehicles. The national average is $1.14. The data are available on a new calculator that is part of the Energy Department's launch of eGallon -- a way for consumers to compare the cost of fueling electric and gasoline vehicles.
AUTOS
August 3, 2013 | By Catherine Green
Electric cars will probably remain a tiny niche of the auto industry until drivers see a serious expansion of charging stations. But you can't just put one on every corner next to the gas station. The cars can take hours to fully charge, which would create a big parking problem, among other issues. Even if consumers bought electric cars in droves tomorrow, the infrastructure to keep them rolling would look much different. Charging starts at home, with a charging station that can cost drivers $500 to $2,000.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2009 | By Ben Fritz
In a move that will be watched carefully by newspapers struggling to find a viable financial model in the digital age, entertainment industry publication Variety today will begin charging readers for access to the news and information on its website. The return to erecting a "pay wall," though anticipated, nonetheless could be risky because several online competitors -- including the Hollywood Reporter, Deadline, the Wrap and the Los Angeles Times -- offer similar content without charge, potentially undermining Variety's ability to get subscribers to pay. Although it's one of the first publications to make the move to cut off unpaid access to its site, many others are examining the issue as advertising migrates from print to the Internet.
AUTOS
April 8, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
San Francisco-based Ecotality Inc., which operates the nation's second-largest network of public electric charging stations for vehicles, announced today that it plans to install 225 new chargers at Kroger Co. stores in California and Arizona. Kroger is the country's largest grocery chain, and includes Ralphs and Food 4 Less. It will invest about $1.5 million to install Ecotality's Blink charging stations and DC Fast Chargers. The installations in California will be made in Los Angeles and San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
An Orange County hospital has plugged into the new age of electric, emission-free engines by installing a charging station for electric vehicles on its grounds. Saddleback Memorial Medical Center recently opened its new self-serve charging station to the public. Doctors, patients and the public may pull into the parking lot in front of the hospital's emergency room at any time to charge their electric vehicle batteries free. No more smelly gas or dirty hands, as in regular gas stations, just clean electricity.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | From United Press International
A charging Alaska brown bear was shot and killed by an Exxon cleanup crew working to remove oil from park shorelines fouled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the National Park Service reported Saturday. State and federal agencies were investigating the shooting, Park Service spokesman John Quinley said. It is against the law to shoot bears in national parks except in self-defense. Quinley said witnesses reported that the brown bear was shot Friday in Katmai National Park at a distance of 16 feet as the crew members tried to capture an eagle that had oil on it.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | Lisa Mascaro, Michael Memoli
WASHINGTON -- A Republican congressman is expected to face charges in a long-running federal investigation into campaign irregularities, but will continue serving in office, his lawyer said Friday. Rep. Michael R. Grimm, a combat Marine and former FBI agent who represents Staten Island and other parts of New York, has been under investigation for more than two years in what his attorney called a "politically motivated vendetta. " "The U.S. Attorney's office has disclosed its intent to file criminal charges against Congressman Grimm," attorney William J. McGinley said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Compared to "Speed" or "Unstoppable" or other pricey studio thrillers about runaway public vehicles, the lower-budgeted "Last Passenger" may feel a tad modest for the high-octane crowd. However, taken on its own terms, this handsomely made suspense yarn proves an engrossing, pulse-quickening journey that deserves a wider local release than it's receiving. Set on a "slam-door" train (versus newer vehicles fitted with purportedly safer automatic doors), this compact picture finds half a dozen late-night riders stranded on a London commuter train whose brakes have been sabotaged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
In a push to make toll lanes permanent fixtures on two of Los Angeles County's most congested freeways, local transportation officials approved a $1 monthly fee Thursday that will apply to all drivers with electronic tolling accounts, even carpoolers and infrequent users. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's 8-3 vote signals a shift in the agency's approach to drivers who use the 25 miles of experimental toll lanes that link the South Bay and El Monte with downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Two former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies have been charged with conspiracy, perjury and altering evidence in connection with planting guns inside a medical marijuana dispensary to justify two arrests in 2011, prosecutors said. Julio Cesar Martinez, 39, and Anthony Manuel Paez, 32, were charged with one felony count each of conspiracy to obstruct justice and altering evidence as a peace officer, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. Martinez was also charged with two felony counts of perjury and one of filing a false report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Two former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies have been charged with planting guns at a medical marijuana dispensary to arrest two men, one of whom prosecutors said was sentenced to a year in jail before the bad evidence was discovered. Julio Cesar Martinez, 39, and Anthony Manuel Paez, 32, face two felony counts of conspiracy to obstruct justice and altering evidence, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Wednesday. Martinez was charged with two additional felony counts of perjury and one count of filing a false report.
SPORTS
April 21, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
The Clippers needed an answer, and quick. They gave one, and wow. Their response Monday night to a playoff-opening debacle against the Golden State Warriors was powerful enough to temporarily subdue thoughts of the historic Clippers jinx while empowering dreams of a landmark Clippers spring. The answer was visible across the Staples Center sky in a flying Blake Griffin, and across the Staples Center floor in a skidding Chris Paul. The answer was audible on the Staples Center sideline with a screaming and confrontational Doc Rivers, and in the stands with thousands of red shirts whose owners' roars lasted deep into the sweaty night.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2008 | Times Wire Services
US Airways Group Inc., which already charges passengers for sodas and coffee on its flights, plans to begin selling pillows and blankets. The airline, based in Tempe, Ariz., said it was considering a price of $7 and hadn't set a date to start the sales. The carrier would join JetBlue Airways Corp., which in August began charging that price for a pillow-and-blanket set.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1989 | NANCY WRIDE, Times Staff Writer
A North Tustin mother and her daughter were charged Tuesday with failing to obtain a family day-care license--a misdemeanor--in the March 30 drowning of one toddler and the near-drownings of two others who fell into a back-yard swimming pool. Orange County Deputy Dist. Atty. Thomas M. Goethals said a criminal complaint was filed against Diane Brooks, age unknown, and her daughter, Carol Brooks, 24, charging each with one count of "willfully violating" the California health and safety code that requires day-care providers to be licensed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna and Kurt Streeter
A teenager who stowed away on a flight from San Jose to Hawaii and survived has been turned over to child protective services and is unlikely to face criminal charges, the FBI said. The 16-year-old had run away from home when he climbed a fence at San Jose's Mineta international airport on Sunday morning and crawled into the left rear wheel well of  Hawaiian Airlines  flight 45. “He was not planning on going to Hawaii,” said FBI Honolulu spokesman Tom Simon. “He just got on a plane.” Authorities called it a “miracle” that the teen survived the 5 1/2-hour flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Howard Blume
The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office has reviewed an internal L.A. school district report on its iPad contract and concluded that criminal charges are not warranted. The report, which has not been released publicly, raises issues about the handling of the bidding process, according to L.A. Unified School District officials who spoke anonymously because they are not authorized to discuss the review. Apple's iPad was selected as the device to be provided to every student, teacher and campus administrator in the nation's second-largest school system.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|