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Charles Dickson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At about the same time that Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington, D.C., Charles Dickson was learning how to carve wood in a shop class at Markham Middle School in Watts. Today, Dickson will watch as his tribute to the civil rights leader--a 14-foot bronze and concrete sculpture--is unveiled in a Watts ceremony commemorating King's birthday.
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NEWS
February 9, 2006 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
ON the surface, Charles Dickson and Dominique Moody appear to have much in common. Both are distinguished local African American artists who have persevered through potentially debilitating health problems. Both are storytellers -- the soul of folk art -- who have a love of found objects, which they often incorporate into their art.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1991 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington, dreams too long deferred ignited along 103rd Street in Watts, earning the devastated commercial strip the nickname "Charcoal Alley." Since those days of rage in August, 1965, redevelopment has come slowly to 103rd--a major health center, some showcase subsidized housing, a Metro Rail Blue Line depot and a shopping center named for the assassinated civil rights leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At about the same time that Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington, D.C., Charles Dickson was learning how to carve wood in a shop class at Markham Middle School in Watts. Today, Dickson will watch as his tribute to the civil rights leader--a 14-foot bronze and concrete sculpture--is unveiled in a Watts ceremony commemorating King's birthday.
NEWS
February 9, 2006 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
ON the surface, Charles Dickson and Dominique Moody appear to have much in common. Both are distinguished local African American artists who have persevered through potentially debilitating health problems. Both are storytellers -- the soul of folk art -- who have a love of found objects, which they often incorporate into their art.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Railway Artists: Los Angeles-based artists Carl Cheng, Charles Dickson, Daniel Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and Richard Turner are the first artists selected under the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission's Art for Rail Transit program.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY and KIM PAYTON
By sheer scope, the Artists' Salute to Black History Month qualifies as one of the city's biggest annual events recognizing the contributions of African Americans. Works by more than 150 black painters, sculptors and other visual artists from 22 states--the largest exhibit of African American art in the country--have filled both levels of the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza for the better part of a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
"The Work of Art," the latest project of KCET's Arts and Culture Unit (10:30 tonight on Channel 28), has two simultaneous agendas that don't always fuse, well, artfully. The agenda suggested by the title is to show how five Los Angeles artists work--more importantly, how art-making is work, hard work. Photographer John Humble traipses through brush and garbage-strewn wastelands to position his large-format camera for the right shot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1997 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN
When film director and writer Joel Marsden first heard about Watts, his reaction was unfortunately typical--fear. "The name 'Watts' has conjured up bad images that have traveled the world over," said Marsden, 27, who now sees the Watts neighborhood in a completely different light.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: Three hundred or so people ambling around in the Daniel Saxon Gallery on a hot November Saturday night. The artworks lining the walls--by obscure artists as well as art stars such as Laddie John Dill, Leon Golub, the late Carlos Almaraz and D. J. Hall--were auctioned off Saturday for Carecen, the Central American Refugee Center, a grass-roots nonprofit organization that provides legal and social services for about half a million refugees from El Salvador and Guatemala in L. A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1991 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington, dreams too long deferred ignited along 103rd Street in Watts, earning the devastated commercial strip the nickname "Charcoal Alley." Since those days of rage in August, 1965, redevelopment has come slowly to 103rd--a major health center, some showcase subsidized housing, a Metro Rail Blue Line depot and a shopping center named for the assassinated civil rights leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a new "art gallery" planned for the South Bay, an expansive museum stretching from El Segundo to Lennox to Inglewood. It also will double as a mass transit system. The Los Angeles County Transportation Commission is hiring artists to create public art projects for the Metro Rail stations under construction. The commission is also seeking area residents to volunteer as advisers.
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